Virginia Cavaliers men's basketball

VirginiaVirginia CavaliersUniversity of VirginiabasketballCavaliersUVAVirginia Cavaliers basketballVirginia CavalierVirginia men's basketballbasketball team
The Virginia Cavaliers men's basketball team is the intercollegiate men's basketball program representing the University of Virginia.wikipedia
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University of Virginia

VirginiaUniversity of Virginia at CharlottesvilleThe University of Virginia
The Virginia Cavaliers men's basketball team is the intercollegiate men's basketball program representing the University of Virginia.
Virginia men's basketball and Virginia men's lacrosse won NCAA Championships in 2019 to join several Cavalier teams in winning recent national championship events including the College Cup, College World Series, and NCAA Tennis Championships.

Tony Bennett (basketball)

Tony BennettTony Bennett (basketball, born 1969)Tony
The team is coached by Tony Bennett and plays home games at the on-campus John Paul Jones Arena (14,593) which opened in 2006. Tony Bennett arrived in March 2009 and got to work in building ”a program that lasts." His 2013–14 team led by Joe Harris and Malcolm Brogdon brought Virginia its first ACC Tournament Championship in 38 years and its first Sweet Sixteen appearance in 19 years. The 2014–15 squad, led by Justin Anderson and Brogdon, started 19–0 and was even more dominant throughout the season as this team more than doubled up the scores of Georgia Tech and Wake Forest, only the second and third times in history that one ACC team scored twice as many points as another ACC team in official competition. However, Anderson broke his finger against Louisville and did not return until the NCAA Tournament where he was much diminished and the team bowed out to Michigan State in the second round. Brogdon led the 2015–16 team to the Elite Eight, but they fell just short of the elusive Final Four after a late rally by Syracuse.
Originally inheriting a 10-win team, his Virginia Cavaliers have since had four 30-win seasons; won the NCAA Tournament Championship in 2019; won ACC Tournaments in 2014 and in 2018; and have finished [[List of Atlantic Coast Conference men's basketball regular season champions#By school|first in the ACC]] standings four times.

John Paul Jones Arena

Charlottesville, VirginiaUVA's current basketball arena
The team is coached by Tony Bennett and plays home games at the on-campus John Paul Jones Arena (14,593) which opened in 2006.
Since its opening in 2006, it serves as the home to the Virginia Cavaliers men's and women's basketball teams, as well as for concerts and other events.

List of Atlantic Coast Conference men's basketball regular season champions

first in the ACCACC regular seasonnine ACC season titles
The program has since won [[List of Atlantic Coast Conference men's basketball regular season champions#By school|nine ACC season titles]], third-best all-time.

Henry Lannigan

Pop LanniganHenry "Pops" Lannigan
Virginia was a top program (254–95) in the early years of college basketball under the tutelage of Pop Lannigan from 1905–1929, and even a consistent winner under dual-sport football coach Gus Tebell from 1930–1951, but the Cavaliers struggled in the 1950s and 1960s before Terry Holland arrived in 1974 to win their first ACC Championship and earn their first NCAA Tournament appearance in just his second year.
Henry Hayden Lannigan (1863–December 26, 1930), known as Pop Lannigan, was a Welshman and immigrant to the United States who was the first head coach in Virginia Cavaliers basketball history from 1905 to 1929 and one of the "most noted athletic trainers in the East."

Naismith College Player of the Year

Naismith AwardNaismithNaismith Trophy
He lived up to that hype would become one of the most dominant college players the game has ever known, winning three consecutive Naismith College Player of the Year awards to tie him with Bill Walton as the most awarded individual player in NCAA history.
Bill Walton of UCLA and Ralph Sampson of the University of Virginia have been the only men to win this award multiple times, with both winning three times.

Terry Holland

Holland, Terry
Virginia was a top program (254–95) in the early years of college basketball under the tutelage of Pop Lannigan from 1905–1929, and even a consistent winner under dual-sport football coach Gus Tebell from 1930–1951, but the Cavaliers struggled in the 1950s and 1960s before Terry Holland arrived in 1974 to win their first ACC Championship and earn their first NCAA Tournament appearance in just his second year. Terry Holland was hired from Davidson in 1975, and with star Wally Walker surprised the ACC in just his second year as head coach when his sixth-seeded Virginia defeated AP No.
As a Cavalier, Holland accumulated a winning record of 326–173, becoming the winningest men's basketball coach in Virginia history.

Wally Walker

Walker
Terry Holland was hired from Davidson in 1975, and with star Wally Walker surprised the ACC in just his second year as head coach when his sixth-seeded Virginia defeated AP No.
A prolific frontcourt scorer while in college, Walker led the Virginia Cavaliers to their first Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament championship and its first NCAA Tournament berth in 1976.

Michael Jordan

JordanMichael Jordan Motorsports Michael Jordan
Carolina notoriously held the ball in a four corners offense for most of the last seven minutes of the game, despite having UNC's most celebrated NBA superstars Michael Jordan and James Worthy on the floor, to defeat Virginia in the 1982 ACC Tournament 47–45.
Jordan was recruited by numerous college basketball programs, including Duke, North Carolina, South Carolina, Syracuse, and Virginia.

Joe Harris (basketball)

Joe HarrisHarris
Tony Bennett arrived in March 2009 and got to work in building ”a program that lasts." His 2013–14 team led by Joe Harris and Malcolm Brogdon brought Virginia its first ACC Tournament Championship in 38 years and its first Sweet Sixteen appearance in 19 years. The 2014–15 squad, led by Justin Anderson and Brogdon, started 19–0 and was even more dominant throughout the season as this team more than doubled up the scores of Georgia Tech and Wake Forest, only the second and third times in history that one ACC team scored twice as many points as another ACC team in official competition. However, Anderson broke his finger against Louisville and did not return until the NCAA Tournament where he was much diminished and the team bowed out to Michigan State in the second round. Brogdon led the 2015–16 team to the Elite Eight, but they fell just short of the elusive Final Four after a late rally by Syracuse.
He played college basketball for the University of Virginia before being selected with the 33rd overall pick in the 2014 NBA draft by the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Malcolm Brogdon

Brogdon
Tony Bennett arrived in March 2009 and got to work in building ”a program that lasts." His 2013–14 team led by Joe Harris and Malcolm Brogdon brought Virginia its first ACC Tournament Championship in 38 years and its first Sweet Sixteen appearance in 19 years. The 2014–15 squad, led by Justin Anderson and Brogdon, started 19–0 and was even more dominant throughout the season as this team more than doubled up the scores of Georgia Tech and Wake Forest, only the second and third times in history that one ACC team scored twice as many points as another ACC team in official competition. However, Anderson broke his finger against Louisville and did not return until the NCAA Tournament where he was much diminished and the team bowed out to Michigan State in the second round. Brogdon led the 2015–16 team to the Elite Eight, but they fell just short of the elusive Final Four after a late rally by Syracuse.
He played college basketball for the Virginia Cavaliers under Tony Bennett.

Pete Gillen

After Holland retired the next year, the Cavaliers were coached by Jeff Jones for eight years, Pete Gillen for seven, and Dave Leitao for four.
Peter Joseph Gillen (born June 20, 1947) is an American former college basketball head coach of the Division I Xavier Musketeers, Providence Friars and Virginia Cavaliers and is a member of the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame.

Dean Smith

Smith
Virginia would attain its first AP Top 5 rankings and go to its first Final Four in Sampson's era, but would be stonewalled by Dean Smith and North Carolina both in that Final Four and in ACC Tournaments.
The Tar Heels actually finished in a tie for first in the ACC regular season with the Ralph Sampson-led Virginia Cavaliers.

Justin Anderson (basketball)

Justin Anderson
Tony Bennett arrived in March 2009 and got to work in building ”a program that lasts." His 2013–14 team led by Joe Harris and Malcolm Brogdon brought Virginia its first ACC Tournament Championship in 38 years and its first Sweet Sixteen appearance in 19 years. The 2014–15 squad, led by Justin Anderson and Brogdon, started 19–0 and was even more dominant throughout the season as this team more than doubled up the scores of Georgia Tech and Wake Forest, only the second and third times in history that one ACC team scored twice as many points as another ACC team in official competition. However, Anderson broke his finger against Louisville and did not return until the NCAA Tournament where he was much diminished and the team bowed out to Michigan State in the second round. Brogdon led the 2015–16 team to the Elite Eight, but they fell just short of the elusive Final Four after a late rally by Syracuse.
He played college basketball for the Virginia Cavaliers before being selected with the 21st overall pick in the 2015 NBA draft by the Dallas Mavericks.

Jeff Lamp

Athletic, quick, and seven-foot-four, Ralph Sampson was perhaps the most desired high school recruit in college basketball history when he chose to play with Jeff Lamp at Virginia over Kentucky in 1979.
Lamp played college basketball at the University of Virginia, with the Cavaliers.

Mamadi Diakite

He made the first but missed the second, yet Mamadi Diakite backtapped the ball into the backcourt where Kihei Clark recovered and sent a bullet pass back to Diakite with only one second remaining in the game.
Mamadi Diakite (born January 21, 1997) is a Guinean college basketball player for the Virginia Cavaliers of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

De'Andre Hunter

De’Andre Hunter
This Virginia team featured a vaunted Bennett defense along with the three-pronged offensive attack of De'Andre Hunter, Kyle Guy, and Ty Jerome, also known as the "Big Three." Eventual top-10 picks in the subsequent NBA draft De'Andre Hunter and Jarrett Culver shot 1-for-8 and 0-for-6 from the field in the first half respectively, but Hunter came roaring out for the second half and shot 7-for-8 to end with a career-high 27 points while the NABC Defensive Player of the Year sophomore limited Culver to 5-for-22 shooting and a 15-point total.
He played college basketball for the Virginia Cavaliers where they won the National Championship in 2019.

James Worthy

James A. WorthyWorthy
Carolina notoriously held the ball in a four corners offense for most of the last seven minutes of the game, despite having UNC's most celebrated NBA superstars Michael Jordan and James Worthy on the floor, to defeat Virginia in the 1982 ACC Tournament 47–45.
A consensus first team All-American, Worthy shared College Player of the Year honors with Virginia Cavalier Ralph Sampson.

Buzzy Wilkinson

Buzz Wilkinson
Buzzy Wilkinson scored 32.1 points per game in 1954-55 and is still the all-time ACC leader in scoring per game for both the single-season and career (28.1) categories.
A 6'2" guard-forward from the University of Virginia and a prolific scorer, he averaged 32.1 points per game in his senior season of 1954-55, and totaled 2,233 points during his college career. His number 14 was the first number retired in Virginia Cavaliers basketball history.

NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament

NCAA TournamentNCAA Men's Division I Basketball ChampionshipNCAA Division I
Virginia was a top program (254–95) in the early years of college basketball under the tutelage of Pop Lannigan from 1905–1929, and even a consistent winner under dual-sport football coach Gus Tebell from 1930–1951, but the Cavaliers struggled in the 1950s and 1960s before Terry Holland arrived in 1974 to win their first ACC Championship and earn their first NCAA Tournament appearance in just his second year.
Since 1985, when the tournament expanded to 64 teams, Duke has won five championships; North Carolina and UConn have each won four; Kentucky & Villanova have three; Kansas & Florida have two; and Arizona, Arkansas, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Michigan State, Louisville, Syracuse, UCLA, UNLV, Virginia, and Wyoming have one.

NABC Defensive Player of the Year

Henry Iba Corinthian Awardco-National Defensive Player of the YearNABC
Eventual top-10 picks in the subsequent NBA draft De'Andre Hunter and Jarrett Culver shot 1-for-8 and 0-for-6 from the field in the first half respectively, but Hunter came roaring out for the second half and shot 7-for-8 to end with a career-high 27 points while the NABC Defensive Player of the Year sophomore limited Culver to 5-for-22 shooting and a 15-point total.
The only other schools with more than one recipient are Connecticut, with two recipients who combined for four awards, and Ohio State, Kentucky, and Virginia with two recipients who each won the award once.

Ty Jerome

This Virginia team featured a vaunted Bennett defense along with the three-pronged offensive attack of De'Andre Hunter, Kyle Guy, and Ty Jerome, also known as the "Big Three."
He played college basketball for the Virginia Cavaliers.

National Invitation Tournament

NITNational Invitational TournamentNIT Tournament
Virginia has won one NCAA Championship, two National Invitation Tournaments, and three ACC Tournament titles.

Kyle Guy

This Virginia team featured a vaunted Bennett defense along with the three-pronged offensive attack of De'Andre Hunter, Kyle Guy, and Ty Jerome, also known as the "Big Three."
He played college basketball for the Virginia Cavaliers for 3 years.

1984 NBA draft

19841984 draftNBA draft
There they lost 49–47, in overtime, to a Houston team led by the first pick of the 1984 NBA Draft, Hakeem Olajuwon, who then joined Sampson to form the original Twin Towers of the NBA on the Houston Rockets.