Virginia Military Institute

VMIVirginia MilitaryThe Virginia Military InstituteMilitary InstituteThe VMI caseV.M.I.VirginiaVirginia Military AcademyVirginia Military Institute (VMI)Virginia Military Institute (VMI) Keydets
Founded 11 November 1839 in Lexington, Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) is the oldest state-supported military college and the first public Senior Military College in the United States.wikipedia
1,184 Related Articles

Military academy

military schoolmilitary academiesmilitary college
Founded 11 November 1839 in Lexington, Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) is the oldest state-supported military college and the first public Senior Military College in the United States.
The only exception is the Virginia Military Institute, which remains all-military.

United States senior military college

senior military collegeSenior Military CollegesMilitary Colleges
Founded 11 November 1839 in Lexington, Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) is the oldest state-supported military college and the first public Senior Military College in the United States.
Founded in 1839 in Lexington, Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute is the oldest state military college in the United States.

John Thomas Lewis Preston

John T. L. PrestonJohn T.L. Preston
In the 1830s Lexington attorney John Thomas Lewis Preston belonged to a debate club known as the Franklin Society.
He was a primary founder and organizer of the Virginia Military Institute, and was one of its first two faculty members.

William Gilham

Under Jackson, then a major, and Major William Gilham, VMI infantry and artillery units were present at the execution by hanging of John Brown at Charles Town, Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1859.
A member of the faculty at Virginia Military Institute, in 1860, he wrote a military manual which was still in modern use 145 years later.

Scott Shipp

Scott ShipCharles Robert Scott Ship
At New Market, in a matter of minutes, VMI suffered fifty-five casualties with ten cadets killed; the cadets were led into battle by the Commandant of Cadets and future VMI Superintendent Colonel Scott Shipp.
He was the second superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute, briefly the president of Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College (Virginia Tech) and led the VMI Cadets at the Battle of New Market during the American Civil War.

Battle of New Market

New Marketbattle at New Market, VABattle of Newmarket
After marching overnight 80 miles from Lexington to New Market, on 15 May 1864, 247 members of the VMI Corps of Cadets fought at the Battle of New Market.
A makeshift Confederate army of 4,100 men, which included cadets from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), defeated Union Major General Franz Sigel and his Army of the Shenandoah.

Union Army

UnionUnion troopsUnion forces
VMI alumni were regarded among the best officers of the South and several distinguished themselves in the Union forces as well.
He eventually became the commander of the Confederate army.) The South did have the advantage of other military colleges, such as The Citadel and Virginia Military Institute, but they produced fewer officers.

Sun Li-jen

Sun LirenSun Li Jen
China's General Sun Li-jen, known as the "Rommel of the East", was also a graduate of VMI.
Sun Li-jen (December 8, 1900 – November 19, 1990) KBE was a Chinese Nationalist (KMT) general, a graduate of Virginia Military Institute, best known for his leadership in the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Chinese Civil War.

John A. Lejeune

John Archer LejeuneJohn LejeuneBrigadier General John A. Lejeune
His service with the Marine Corps after he retired was as the 5th Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute.

James Henry Lane (Confederate general)

James H. LaneJames Henry LaneJames Lane
Three of Jackson's four division commanders at Chancellorsville, Generals James Lane, Robert Rodes, and Raleigh Colston, were VMI graduates as were more than twenty of his brigadiers and colonels.
He graduated from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) in 1854 and received a master's degree from the University of Virginia in 1857.

George R. E. Shell

He later served as the 9th Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute.

Matthew Fontaine Maury

Matthew F. MauryMatthew MauryMaury
Following the war, Matthew Fontaine Maury, the pioneering oceanographer known as the "Pathfinder of the Seas", accepted a teaching position at VMI, holding the physics chair.
Following the war, Maury accepted a teaching position at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia.

Washington and Lee University

Washington & Lee UniversityWashington CollegeWashington and Lee
VMI is spending another $200 million to build the VMI Center for Leadership and Ethics, to be used by cadets, Washington and Lee University students, and other U.S. and international students.
Washington and Lee's 325-acre campus sits at the edge of Lexington and abuts the campus of the Virginia Military Institute in the Shenandoah Valley region between the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Allegheny Mountains.

Sam S. Walker

Sam Sims Walker
It does not list alumni who did not graduate from the school, such as General George S. Patton and General Sam S. Walker, and the many VMI graduates who served or still serve as four-star generals in foreign nations such as Thailand, China, and Taiwan.
He enrolled in the Virginia Military Institute in 1941, but transferred to the United States Military Academy the next year.

Francis Henney Smith

Francis H. SmithSmith, Francis Henney
He was persuaded that West Point graduate and Army officer Francis Henney Smith, then on the faculty at Hampden–Sydney College, was the most suitable candidate.
After graduating from West Point and a brief service in the United States Army, he became the first Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute on its establishment in 1839, and held that post until shortly before his death.

J. H. Binford Peay III

J.H. Binford Peay III
James Henry Binford "Binnie" Peay III (born May 10, 1940, in Richmond, Virginia) is a retired four-star general from the United States Army and is currently the 14th Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute.

Claudius Crozet

Benoît "Claudius" CrozetClaude CrozetColonel Claudius Crozet
The organizers of the planned school formed a board of visitors, which included Preston, and the board selected Claudius Crozet, a U.S. Army veteran who had served under Napoleon Bonaparte in France before immigrating to the United States, to serve as their President.
Crozet also helped found the Virginia Military Institute in 1839 and earned a nickname as the "Pathfinder of the Blue Ridge."

Stonewall Jackson

Thomas J. "Stonewall" JacksonThomas "Stonewall" JacksonThomas J. Jackson
In 1851 Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson became a member of the faculty and professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy.
From 1851 to 1863 he taught at the Virginia Military Institute, where he was unpopular with his students.

Raleigh E. Colston

Raleigh ColstonColston, Raleigh E. "ParlezRaleigh Edward Colston
Three of Jackson's four division commanders at Chancellorsville, Generals James Lane, Robert Rodes, and Raleigh Colston, were VMI graduates as were more than twenty of his brigadiers and colonels.
Colston entered the Virginia Military Institute in 1843 and graduated July 4, 1846, fourth in a class of fourteen.

Lexington, Virginia

LexingtonLexington, VALexington City
Founded 11 November 1839 in Lexington, Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) is the oldest state-supported military college and the first public Senior Military College in the United States.
Lexington is the location of the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) and of Washington and Lee University (W&L).

George Marshall

George C. MarshallMarshallGeneral George C. Marshall
The most important of these was George C. Marshall, the top U.S. Army general during the war.
Born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, Marshall graduated from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) in 1901.

Barracks, Virginia Military Institute

barracksOld Barracksthe Barracks
The Old Barracks, which has been separately designated a National Historic Landmark, stands on the site of the old arsenal.
The Old Barracks is a historic building on the campus of the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia.

Charles E. Kilbourne

Charles Evans Kilbourne, Jr.
After World War I, he served as the Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute, succeeding General John A. Lejeune, and had a post-military career as a distinguished writer.

George S. Patton

George PattonGeneral PattonPatton
It does not list alumni who did not graduate from the school, such as General George S. Patton and General Sam S. Walker, and the many VMI graduates who served or still serve as four-star generals in foreign nations such as Thailand, China, and Taiwan.
Born in 1885 to a family with an extensive military background that spanned both the United States and Confederate States armies, Patton attended the Virginia Military Institute and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Officer (armed forces)

officercommissionedofficers
All cadets must participate in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) of the United States Armed Forces programs, but are afforded the flexibility of pursuing civilian endeavors or accepting an officer's commission in any of the active or reserve components of any of the U.S. military branches upon graduation.
There is no Marine Corps ROTC program per se, but there exists a Marine Corps Option for selected midshipmen in the Naval ROTC programs at civilian colleges and universities or at non-Federal military colleges such as The Citadel and the Virginia Military Institute.