Visayans

VisayanVisayan peopleBisayaCebuano VisayanAncient VisayanBisaya regionBisayanmga BisayaVisayan ethnic groupsVisayan ethnolinguistic group
The Visayans (Visayan: Mga Bisaya; ) is an umbrella term for the Philippine ethnolinguistic groups native to the whole Visayas, the southernmost islands of Luzon and most parts of Mindanao.wikipedia
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Ethnic groups in the Philippines

ethnic groupsFilipino ethnolinguistic groupFilipino ethnic groups
The Visayans (Visayan: Mga Bisaya; ) is an umbrella term for the Philippine ethnolinguistic groups native to the whole Visayas, the southernmost islands of Luzon and most parts of Mindanao.
Ethnolinguistic nations include the Ivatan, Pangasinan, Kapampangan, Tagalog, Bicolano, Visayans (Masbateño, Hiligaynon, Cebuano, Waray, Butuanon, Romblomanon, Kamayo, Cuyonon, and Surigaonon), Zamboangueño, Subanon, and more.

Cebuano language

CebuanoVisayanCebuano-speaking
Most Visayans are speakers of one or more Visayan languages, the most widely spoken being Cebuano, closely followed by Hiligaynon (Ilonggo) and Waray-Waray.
The Cebuano or Cebuan language, also often referred informally to by most of its speakers simply as Bisaya (English translation: "Visayan", not to be confused with other Visayan languages), is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about closely 45 million people in Central Visayas, western parts of Eastern Visayas and most parts of Mindanao, most of whom belong to various Visayan ethnolinguistic groups, mainly the Cebuanos.

Pintados

Pintadoethnic groupLos Pintados
In fact, at the early part of Spanish colonialization of the Philippines, the Spaniards used the term Visayan only for these areas, while the people of Cebu, Bohol, and western Leyte were for a long time known only as Pintados.
Pintados was the term used by Spanish colonists to describe the tattooed indigenous Cebuano Visayan people.

Biliran

Biliran provinceProvince of Biliran
During this period, the eastern islands of Samar, Leyte and Biliran (including Marinduque) were directly governed by the Malolos Republic through Vicente Lukban and later by Ambrosio Mojica.
A contending theory states that the name came from the word bilir, which was defined in an old Visayan dictionary to be the “corner or edge of a boat, vase or anything protruding, like veins, or the furrow made by the plow.” The dictionary also gives biliran as an alternate spelling for bilir.

Leyte (province)

LeyteLeyte Province(Northern) Leyte
Before being colonized by Spain, the island was once home to indigenous animist Warays to the East and other indigenous Hindu-Buddhist Visayan groups to the west.

Philippine mythology

Philippinefolkloreethnoreligious
Those particularly within the Visayas broadly share a sea-based culture with strong Roman Catholic traditions merged with cultural elements through centuries of interaction and inter-migrations mainly across the seas of Visayan, Sibuyan, Camotes and Bohol, and in some secluded areas merged with ancient animistic-polytheistic influences (i.e. Folk Catholicism).
This is an ancient Visayan account of creation:

Cebu

Cebu IslandCebu, PhilippinesCebú
In the Visayan theater of the Revolution, Pantaleón Villegas (better known as León Kilat) led the Cebuano revolution in the Battle of Tres de Abril (April 3). One of his successors, Arcadio Maxilom, is a prominent general in the liberalization of Cebu.

South Cotabato

Governor of South CotabatoSo'''''uth CotabatoSouth
Spaniards already took with them Chavacano-speaking Christians and Muslims from Zamboanga and Basilan, as well as the Visayans, especially the Hiligaynons and Cebuanos.

Sergio Osmeña

OsmeñaSergio Suico OsmeñaOsmena
Since Philippine independence from the United States, there have been three Philippine Presidents from the Visayan regions: the Cebuano Sergio Osmeña, the Capiznon Manuel Roxas and the Boholano Carlos P. García.
A founder of the Nacionalista Party, Osmeña was also the first Visayan to become President.

Compostela Valley

Compostela Valley provinceCompostella ValleyList
Although a virtual melting pot, the Visayans (mostly Cebuano-speaking) are the dominant group in Compostela Valley.

Iloilo City

Iloilocity of IloiloCity
This short-lived federal government, based in Iloilo, was an accumulation of revolutionary movements across Panay and Negros. Throughout centuries, non-Visayan groups, most notably foreigners such as the Chinese, have settled in predominantly-Visayan cities in Visayas like Iloilo, Bacolod, Dumaguete and Cebu and Mindanao such as Cagayan de Oro, Iligan, Davao and General Santos.
Some historians also affirm the Sumatran origin of the people of Panay, observing that the Visayans derived their writing system from those of Toba, Borneo, Celebes, Ancient Java and from the Edicts of the ancient Indian emperor Ashoka.

Panay

Panay IslandCentral Panay Mountain Rangeisland of Panay
This short-lived federal government, based in Iloilo, was an accumulation of revolutionary movements across Panay and Negros. According to H. Otley Beyer and other anthropologists, the term Visayan (Spanish: bisayo) was first applied only to the people of Panay and to their settlements eastward in the island of Negros, and northward in the smaller islands, which now compose the province of Romblon.
The term Visayan was first applied only to them and to their settlements eastward in the island of Negros, and northward in the smaller islands, which now compose the province of Romblon.

Cagayan de Oro

Cagayan de Oro CityCagayan de MisamisCagayan
Throughout centuries, non-Visayan groups, most notably foreigners such as the Chinese, have settled in predominantly-Visayan cities in Visayas like Iloilo, Bacolod, Dumaguete and Cebu and Mindanao such as Cagayan de Oro, Iligan, Davao and General Santos.
In 1622, two Spanish Augustinian Recollect missionaries reached the settlement and described it as being inhabited by a mixed stock descended from highlander Bukidnon Lumad and sea-faring Visayans ("Dumagat").

Luzon

Luzon Islandnorthern LuzonNorth Luzon
The Visayans (Visayan: Mga Bisaya; ) is an umbrella term for the Philippine ethnolinguistic groups native to the whole Visayas, the southernmost islands of Luzon and most parts of Mindanao.
Visayans mainly predominate in the island provinces of Masbate, Palawan and Romblon.

Davao City

DavaoDavao City, PhilippinesDavao City, Davao del Sur
Throughout centuries, non-Visayan groups, most notably foreigners such as the Chinese, have settled in predominantly-Visayan cities in Visayas like Iloilo, Bacolod, Dumaguete and Cebu and Mindanao such as Cagayan de Oro, Iligan, Davao and General Santos.
Residents of Davao City and the whole corresponding Davao Region are colloquially known as Davaoeños. Nearly all of local Davaoeños are Visayans (the majority are Cebuanos, with the rest being Hiligaynons), while others of different ethnicities collectively categorized as the Lumad s make up the remainder of the local population.

Rodrigo Duterte

DuterteRodrigo Roa DutertePresident Rodrigo Duterte
Current president Rodrigo Duterte, who is of Visayan ethnicity, also has Cebuano roots.
Duterte is also the first local chief executive to get elected straight to the Office of the President, the second Cebuano to become president (after Sergio Osmeña), the third Cebuano-speaking president (after Osmeña and Carlos P. Garcia), the first Visayan from Mindanao and the fourth Visayan overall (after Osmeña, Manuel Roxas and Garcia).

Lumad

ManoboBukidnonBagobo
In Northern Mindanao, Visayans (both Mindanao natives and migrants) are also referred to by the Lumad as the dumagat ("sea people", not to be confused with the Dumagat Aeta).
Visayan people

Visayan languages

VisayanBisayaVisayan language
The Visayans (Visayan: Mga Bisaya; ) is an umbrella term for the Philippine ethnolinguistic groups native to the whole Visayas, the southernmost islands of Luzon and most parts of Mindanao. Most Visayans are speakers of one or more Visayan languages, the most widely spoken being Cebuano, closely followed by Hiligaynon (Ilonggo) and Waray-Waray.

Capiz

Capiz ProvinceCapiz Province, PhilippinesProvince of Capiz
Movements in Capiz were led by Esteban Contreras with the aid of Alejandro Balgos, Santiago Bellosillo and other Ilustrados.
It is a member of the Visayan language family and the people using it are part of the wider Visayan ethnolinguistic group, who constitute the largest Filipino ethnolinguistic group.

Diego Luis de San Vitores

Padre San VitoresDiego de San VitoresDiego Luis de San Vítores
In 1672, Pedro Calungsod, a teenage indigenous Visayan catechist and Diego Luis de San Vitores, a Spanish friar, were both martyred in Guam during their mission to preach Christianity to the Chamorro people.
In their search for a runaway companion named Esteban, San Vitores and his Visayan companion Pedro Calungsod came to the village of Tumon, Guam on 2 April 1672.

Ati people

Atiaboriginal peoplesAtis
The Tausūg, a Moro ethnic group, only use Bisaya to refer to the predominantly Christian lowland natives which Visayans are popularly recognized as. This is a similar case to the Ati, who delineate Visayans from fellow Negritos.
According to some oral traditions, they also predate the Bisaya, who now inhabit most of the Visayas.

Visayas

VisayanVisayan IslandsVisayan Island
The Visayans (Visayan: Mga Bisaya; ) is an umbrella term for the Philippine ethnolinguistic groups native to the whole Visayas, the southernmost islands of Luzon and most parts of Mindanao.
Visayans

Moro people

MoroMorosMoro Muslims
The Tausūg, a Moro ethnic group, only use Bisaya to refer to the predominantly Christian lowland natives which Visayans are popularly recognized as. This is a similar case to the Ati, who delineate Visayans from fellow Negritos.
The precolonial Tagalogs, Kapampangan or Visayan, are seen as being culturally similar to the Moro, although in the case of the Visayan people, they were more Hindu-Buddhist influenced instead (see Rajahnate of Cebu)

Binirayan festival

Binirayan (literally, "place where the boats landed") Festival
The arrival of the ten Bornean datus as mentioned in the legend of Maragtas is celebrated in Binirayan Festival in Antique.
Consequently, the dates of the festival, which has become one of the major festivals in the West Visayan region has suffered inconsistency with the every change of leadership of the province.

Waray people

WarayWaraysKuratsa Dance
Another, although originally written in Tagalog, is Waray-Waray, which speaks of the common stereotypes and positive characteristics of the Waray people.
The Waray people are a subgroup of the Visayan people whose primary language is the Waray language (also called Lineyte-Samarnon), an Austronesian language native to the islands of Samar, Leyte and Biliran, which together comprise the Eastern Visayas Region of the Philippines.