Visigothic Kingdom

VisigothsVisigothicKingVisigothKing of the VisigothsVisigothic SpainVisigothic kingVisigothic Kingdom of HispaniaVisigothic Kingdom of ToledoVisigothic rule
The Visigothic Kingdom or Kingdom of the Visigoths (Regnum Gothorum) was a kingdom that occupied what is now southwestern France and the Iberian Peninsula from the 5th to the 8th centuries.wikipedia
526 Related Articles

Visigoths

VisigothicVisigothGothic
One of the Germanic successor states to the Western Roman Empire, it was originally created by the settlement of the Visigoths under King Wallia in the province of Aquitaine in southwest France by the Roman government and then extended by conquest over all of the Iberian Peninsula.
After the Visigoths sacked Rome, they began settling down, first in southern Gaul and eventually in Hispania, where they founded the Visigothic Kingdom and maintained a presence from the 5th to the 8th centuries AD.

Toledo, Spain

ToledoToledancity of Toledo
The kingdom of the 6th and 7th centuries is sometimes called the regnum Toletanum after the new capital of Toledo.
It was also the capital from 542 to 725 AD of the ancient Visigothic kingdom, which followed the fall of the Roman Empire, and the location of historic events such as the Visigothic Councils of Toledo.

Umayyad conquest of Hispania

Muslim conquestMoorish invasionMuslim invasion
Most of the Visigothic Kingdom was conquered by Umayyad troops from North Africa in 711 AD, with only the northern reaches of Spain remaining in Christian hands.
The conquest resulted in the destruction of the Visigothic Kingdom and the establishment of the independent Emirate of Córdoba under Abd ar-Rahman I, who completed the unification of Muslim-ruled Iberia, or al-Andalus (756–788).

Toulouse

TolosaToulouse, FranceToulousain
Sometimes referred to as the regnum Tolosanum or Kingdom of Toulouse after its capital Toulouse in modern historiography, the kingdom lost much of its territory in Gaul to the Franks in the early 6th century, save the narrow coastal strip of Septimania, but the Visigoth control of Iberia was secured by the end of that century with the submission of the Suebi. Ataulf (King of the Visigoths from 410 to 415) spent the next few years operating in the Gallic and Hispanic countrysides, diplomatically playing competing factions of Germanic and Roman commanders against one another to skillful effect, and taking over cities such as Narbonne and Toulouse (in 413).
The city was the capital of the Visigothic Kingdom in the 5th century and the capital of the province of Languedoc in the Late Middle Ages and early modern period (provinces were abolished during the French Revolution), making it the unofficial capital of the cultural region of Occitania (Southern France).

Galla Placidia

PlacidiaAelia Galla PlacidiaEmpress Galla Placidia
For their part, the Visigoths under Alaric famously sacked Rome in 410, capturing Galla Placidia, the sister of Western Roman emperor Honorius.
She was queen consort to Ataulf, king of the Visigoths from 414 until his death in 415, and briefly empress consort to Constantius III in 421.

Hispania

SpainRomanRomans
Theoderic took control over Hispania Baetica, Carthaginiensis and southern Lusitania.
The name, Hispania, was also used in the period of Visigothic rule.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
One of the Germanic successor states to the Western Roman Empire, it was originally created by the settlement of the Visigoths under King Wallia in the province of Aquitaine in southwest France by the Roman government and then extended by conquest over all of the Iberian Peninsula.
As such, the first of the "barbarian kingdoms", the Visigothic Kingdom, was formed.

Narbonne

NarboNarbo MartiusNarbona
Ataulf (King of the Visigoths from 410 to 415) spent the next few years operating in the Gallic and Hispanic countrysides, diplomatically playing competing factions of Germanic and Roman commanders against one another to skillful effect, and taking over cities such as Narbonne and Toulouse (in 413).
The Umayyad governor Al-Samh captured Narbonne from The Kingdom of Visigoths in 719.

Athanagild

Athanagild, Visigothic king of Hispania
Agila was eventually killed, and his enemy Athanagild (552–568) became the new king.
undefined 517 – December 567) was Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania.

Septimania

GothiaMarch of GothiaGothic March
Sometimes referred to as the regnum Tolosanum or Kingdom of Toulouse after its capital Toulouse in modern historiography, the kingdom lost much of its territory in Gaul to the Franks in the early 6th century, save the narrow coastal strip of Septimania, but the Visigoth control of Iberia was secured by the end of that century with the submission of the Suebi.
Coinage of the Visigothic kingdom of Hispania did not circulate in Gaul outside of Septimania and Frankish coinage did not circulate in the Visigothic kingdom, including Septimania.

Agila I

Visigothic Spain suffered a civil war under King Agila I (549–554), which prompted the Roman/Byzantine emperor Justinian I to send an army and carve out the small province of Spania for the Byzantine Empire along the coast of southern Spain.
Agila I or Achila I (died March 554) was Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania (549–554).

Liuvigild

LeovigildKing LeovigildSiege of Seville (583)
The next Visigothic king was Liuvigild (569 – April 21, 586).
undefined 519 – 21 April 586) was a Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania from 568 to April 21, 586.

Reccared I

ReccaredRecared
On becoming King, Liuvigild's son Reccared I (586–601) converted from Arian to Chalcedonian Christianity.
undefined 559 – 31 May 601 AD; reigned 586–601) was Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania.

Hermenegild

Saint HermenegildSt. HermenegildHermenegild of the Visigoths
When Liuvigild established his son Hermenegild as joint ruler, a civil war ensued between them.
Saint Hermenegild or Ermengild (died 13 April 585) (San Hermenegildo, from Gothic *Airmana-gild, "immense tribute"), was the son of king Liuvigild of the Visigothic Kingdom in the Iberian Peninsula and southern France.

Sisebut

Visigoth king Sisebut
These Kings also worked on religious legislature, especially King Sisebut (612–621), who passed several harsh laws against Jews and forced many Jews to convert to Christianity.
undefined 565 – February 621) was King of the Visigoths and ruler of Hispania and Septimania from 612 until his death.

Visigothic Code

Liber JudiciorumVisigothic lawForum Iudicum
The Visigothic Code (completed in 654) abolished the old tradition of having different laws for Romans and for Visigoths.
The Visigothic Code (Forum Iudicum, Liber Iudiciorum; Libro de los Jueces, Book of the Judges), also called Lex Visigothorum (English: Law of the Visigoths), is a set of laws first promulgated by king Chindasuinth (642–653 AD) of the Visigothic Kingdom in his second year of rule (642–643) that survives only in fragments.

Wamba (king)

WambaKing Wamba
Following Reccesuinth, King Wamba (672–680) was elected king.
During his reign, the Visigothic kingdom encompassed all of Hispania and part of southern Gaul known as Septimania.

Wittiza

Witizarefugee
Egica also raised his son Wittiza as coruler in 698.
undefined 687 – probably 710) was the Visigothic King of Hispania from 694 until his death, co-ruling with his father, Egica, until 702 or 703.

Chindasuinth

King ChindasuinthChindasvinthChindasvinto
Despite all this, another coup took place and Chintila was deposed in 639, and King Tulga took his place; he was also deposed in the third year of his reign and the council elected the noble Chindasuinth as king.
undefined 563 – 30 September 653 AD) was Visigothic King of Hispania, from 642 until his death in 653.

Witteric

Witteric, King of the VisigothsWiterico
Reccared's son Liuva II became king in 601, but was deposed by the Visigothic noble Witteric (603–610), ending the short-lived dynasty.
undefined 565 – 610 AD; reigned 603–610) was the Visigoth King of Hispania, Septimania and Galicia.

Hispania Tarraconensis

TarraconensisTarraconenseTarraconensis region
Euric also attacked the Western Roman Empire, capturing Hispania Tarraconensis in 472, the last bastion of Roman rule in Spain.
The Imperial province of Hispania Tarraconensis lasted until the invasions of the 5th century, beginning in 409, when Suebi, Vandals and Alans crossed the Pyrenees, and ended with the establishment of a Visigothic kingdom.

Musa bin Nusayr

Musa ibn NusayrMusa ibn Nusair al-LakhmiMusa
In 711, Tariq ibn Ziyad, a Muslim Berber client of Musa bin Nusair, the governor of Islamic Africa, invaded Spain with about 7,000 Berber men, while Roderic was in the north fighting the Basques.
He ruled over the Muslim provinces of North Africa (Ifriqiya), and directed the Islamic conquest of the Visigothic Kingdom in Hispania (Spain, Portugal, Andorra and part of France).

Suintila

The Byzantines were finally defeated by Suintila (621–631), who had captured all of their Spanish holdings by 625.
588 – 633/635) was Visigothic King of Hispania, Septimania and Galicia from 621 to 631.

Chintila

The fourth council, held during the brief reign of Sisinand in 633, excommunicated and exiled the king, replacing him with Chintila (636–639).
undefined 606 – 20 December 639 AD) was a Visigothic King of Hispania, Septimania and Galicia from 636.

Vandals

VandalVandalicVandal Kingdom
The Visigoths became Foederati of Rome, and wanted to restore the Roman order against the hordes of Vandals, Alans and Suevi.
Many others were put into imperial service or fled to the two Gothic kingdoms (Ostrogothic Kingdom and Visigothic Kingdom).