Vistula–Oder Offensive

Vistula-Oder OffensiveVistula-OderPolandWinter OffensiveoffensiveVistula–Oderliberation of WarsawVistula-Oder OperationWarsawacross the Vistula and towards the Oder
The Vistula–Oder Offensive was a successful Red Army operation on the Eastern Front in the European Theatre of World War II in January 1945.wikipedia
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Warsaw

WarszawaWarsaw, PolandWarschau
It saw the capture of Kraków, Warsaw and Poznań. The 1st Belorussian Front, holding the sector around Warsaw and southward in the Magnuszew and Puławy bridgeheads, was led by Marshal Georgy Zhukov; the 1st Ukrainian Front, occupying the Sandomierz bridgehead, was led by Marshal Ivan Konev.
A general Warsaw Uprising between August and October 1944 led to even greater devastation and systematic razing by the Germans in advance of the Vistula–Oder Offensive.

Georgy Zhukov

ZhukovMarshal ZhukovG. K. Zhukov
The Red Army had built up their strength around a number of key bridgeheads, with two fronts commanded by Marshal Georgy Zhukov and Marshal Ivan Konev. The 1st Belorussian Front, holding the sector around Warsaw and southward in the Magnuszew and Puławy bridgeheads, was led by Marshal Georgy Zhukov; the 1st Ukrainian Front, occupying the Sandomierz bridgehead, was led by Marshal Ivan Konev.
In 1945, Zhukov commanded the 1st Belorussian Front and took part in the Vistula–Oder Offensive and the Battle of Berlin, which resulted in the defeat of Nazi Germany, and the end of the war in Europe.

Ivan Konev

KonevI. S. KonevIvan Stepanovich Konev
The Red Army had built up their strength around a number of key bridgeheads, with two fronts commanded by Marshal Georgy Zhukov and Marshal Ivan Konev. The 1st Belorussian Front, holding the sector around Warsaw and southward in the Magnuszew and Puławy bridgeheads, was led by Marshal Georgy Zhukov; the 1st Ukrainian Front, occupying the Sandomierz bridgehead, was led by Marshal Ivan Konev.
Konev further commanded forces in major Soviet offensives at Kursk, in the Dnieper-Carpathian and Vistula-Oder offensives.

Josef Harpe

J. Harpe
Against them, the German Army Group A, led by Colonel-General Josef Harpe (soon replaced by Colonel-General Ferdinand Schörner), was outnumbered 5:1.
From September 1944 to January 1945 Army Group A, when he was relieved of his command due to the inability of German forces to stop the Soviet Vistula–Oder Offensive.

Operation Bagration

BagrationBelorussian OffensiveOperation ''Bagration
In the wake of the successful Operation Bagration, the 1st Belorussian Front managed to secure two bridgeheads west of the Vistula river between 27 July and 4 August 1944.
The campaign enabled the next operation, the Vistula–Oder Offensive, to come within sight of the German capital.

1st Belorussian Front

Belorussian Front1stBelorussian
In the wake of the successful Operation Bagration, the 1st Belorussian Front managed to secure two bridgeheads west of the Vistula river between 27 July and 4 August 1944. The 1st Belorussian Front, holding the sector around Warsaw and southward in the Magnuszew and Puławy bridgeheads, was led by Marshal Georgy Zhukov; the 1st Ukrainian Front, occupying the Sandomierz bridgehead, was led by Marshal Ivan Konev.
The next attack was the Warsaw-Poznań Operation, a part of the Vistula-Oder Offensive.

Franz Perkhorovich

Frants Perkhorovich
In November of that year he became commander of the 47th Army, and for his leadership in the Vistula–Oder Offensive in January 1945 was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union, the highest Soviet distinction.

First Polish Army (1944–1945)

1st Polish ArmyFirst Polish ArmyPolish First Army
The First Army fought westward, subordinated to the Soviet 1st Belorussian Front, during the offensive against Germany that led to the liberation of Warsaw in January 1945, and the capture of Berlin in May 1945.

Battle of the Bulge

Ardennes OffensiveArdennes-AlsaceArdennes-Alsace Campaign
It was not done to assist American and British forces during the Battle of the Bulge, as Stalin chose to claim at Yalta.
Hitler originally set the offensive for late November, before the anticipated start of the Russian winter offensive.

1st Guards Tank Army (Russia)

1st Guards Tank Army1st Tank ArmySoviet 1st Guards Tank Army
It fought in the early defense during the Battle of Stalingrad, and Operation Uranus, also participated at the Battle of Kursk, Proskurov-Chernovtsy Operation, Lvov-Sandomierz Operation, Vistula-Oder Offensive and the Battle of Berlin.

Mikhail Katukov

KatukovMarshal of Armoured Troops Mikhail Efimovich KatukovMikhail Yefimovich Katukov
His most notable command during the German-Soviet War was that of 1st Guards Tank Army which he commanded during the Battle of Kursk, Proskurov-Chernovtsy Operation, Lvov-Sandomierz Operation, the Vistula Oder Operation, and the Battle of Berlin.

Eastern Front (World War II)

Eastern FrontGreat Patriotic WarGerman-Soviet War
The Vistula–Oder Offensive was a successful Red Army operation on the Eastern Front in the European Theatre of World War II in January 1945.
Over three days, on a broad front incorporating four army fronts, the Red Army launched the Vistula–Oder Offensive across the Narew River and from Warsaw.

Death marches (Holocaust)

death marchdeath marchesa death march
Within days, German commandants evacuated the concentration camps, sending the prisoners on their death marches to the west, where ethnic Germans also started fleeing.
On January 12, the Soviet army began its Vistula-Oder Offensive, advancing on occupied Poland.

3rd Shock Army

3rd Army3rd Red Banner Army3rd
It then took part in the Vistula-Oder Offensive between 12.1.1945 – 3.2.1945.

5th Guards Army

5th Guards5th5th Guards Armies
The 5th Guards Army fought in the Battle of Kursk, Belgorod-Khar'kov Offensive Operation, Battle of the Dnieper, Uman–Botoșani Offensive, Lvov–Sandomierz Offensive, Vistula–Oder Offensive, Berlin Offensive, and the Prague Offensive.

47th Army

47th47th Armies47th Soviet Army
As part of the 1st BRF, the 47th Army fought in the Vistula-Oder Offensive, East Pomeranian Offensive, and the Berlin Offensive.

59th Army (Soviet Union)

59th Army59th Armies59th
In December, the army transferred to the Sandomierz bridgehead, from which it launched the Vistula–Oder Offensive in January 1945.

Johannes Block

Semyon Bogdanov

Semen BogdanovSemyon Ilyich BogdanovBogdanov
Units under Semyon Bogdanov's command took part in the Battle of Moscow, in the Korsun-Shevchenkovsky, Uman-Botoshany, Belarusian, Vistula-Oder, East Pomeranian and Berlin operations.

Army Group A

Heeresgruppe AAGerman Army Group A
Against them, the German Army Group A, led by Colonel-General Josef Harpe (soon replaced by Colonel-General Ferdinand Schörner), was outnumbered 5:1.
On January 16, 1945 Colonel Bogislaw von Bonin, the Chief of the Operational Branch of the Army General Staff (Generalstab des Heeres) gave Heeresgruppe A permission to retreat during the Soviet Vistula-Oder Offensive, rejecting a direct order from Adolf Hitler for them to hold fast.

33rd Army (Soviet Union)

33rd Army33rd33rd Armies
On September 10, it was released from VGK reserve, and joined the 1st Belorussian Front on October 19 in preparation for the Warsaw-Poznan Offensive.

Courland Pocket

Kurland PocketCourlandBattle of Courland
Guderian had proposed to evacuate the divisions of Army Group North trapped in the Courland Pocket to the Reich via the Baltic Sea to get the necessary manpower for the defence, but Hitler forbade it.
Hostilities consisted of containing German breakout attempts, and the Red Army made no concerted effort to capture the Courland Pocket, which was of little strategic importance after the isolation of Army Group North, whereas the main offensive effort was required for the Vistula-Oder and Berlin Offensives.

Magnuszew

The 1st Belorussian Front, holding the sector around Warsaw and southward in the Magnuszew and Puławy bridgeheads, was led by Marshal Georgy Zhukov; the 1st Ukrainian Front, occupying the Sandomierz bridgehead, was led by Marshal Ivan Konev.
Heavy fighting between Soviet and German forces occurred when the bridgehead was established, and even more fighting occurred in January 1945 when the Red Army broke out of the bridgehead heading for Berlin.

Army Group Vistula

Army Group WeichselArmy Group ''VistulaGerman Army Group Vistula
The German reorganisation of command structure that resulted in the creation of Army Group Vistula was accompanied by the release of a few extra formations for the defense; the V SS Mountain Corps, with two reserve infantry divisions, was deployed along the Obra and the prewar border fortifications known as the Tierschtigel Riegel, while the Panzergrenadier-Division Kurmark was ordered to reinforce it.
It was put together from elements of Army Group A (shattered in the Soviet Vistula-Oder Offensive), Army Group Centre (similarly largely destroyed in the East Prussian Offensive), and a variety of new or ad hoc formations.

Baranów Sandomierski

BaranówBaranowBaranow Sandomierski
At that point there was a large Soviet bridgehead over the Vistula in the area of Baranów before the front continued south to Jasło.
In July 1944, units of the Red Army crossed the Vistula near the town, creating the so-called Baranów Bridgehead (see Vistula–Oder Offensive).