Vitascope

EdisonEdison Vitascopefilm projectorPhantoscope
Vitascope was an early film projector first demonstrated in 1895 by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat.wikipedia
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Thomas Armat

Vitascope was an early film projector first demonstrated in 1895 by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat.
Thomas J. Armat (October 25, 1866 – September 30, 1948) was an American mechanic and inventor, a pioneer of cinema best known through the co-invention of the Edison Vitascope.

History of film

film historianfilm historyhistory of cinema
The company realized that their Kinetoscope would soon be a thing of the past with the rapidly advancing proliferation of early cinematic engineering.
Porter, a projectionist, was hired by Thomas Edison to develop his new projection model known as the Vitascope.

Song of the Flame

1930 filmThe Song of the Flame
Vitascope was also used briefly as a trademark by Warner Brothers in 1930 for a widescreen process used for films such as Song of the Flame.
It was the first color film to feature a widescreen sequence, using a process called Vitascope, the trademark name for Warner Bros.' widescreen process.

Widescreen

wide screenwide-screenwidescreen format
Vitascope was also used briefly as a trademark by Warner Brothers in 1930 for a widescreen process used for films such as Song of the Flame.
Warner Brothers released Song of the Flame and Kismet (both 1930) in a widescreen process they called Vitascope.

Kinetoscope

kinetographKinetophonepeephole viewing of motion picture devices
The images being cast are originally taken by a kinetoscope mechanism onto gelatin film.
The rights to the system had been acquired by Charles and Gammon, who redubbed it the Vitascope and arranged with Edison to present himself as its creator.

Thomas Edison

EdisonThomas Alva EdisonThomas A. Edison
Thomas Edison was slow to develop a projection system at this time, since his company's single-user Kinetoscopes were very profitable.
In April 1896, Thomas Armat's Vitascope, manufactured by the Edison factory and marketed in Edison's name, was used to project motion pictures in public screenings in New York City.

Charles Francis Jenkins

Charles JenkinsC. Francis JenkinsCharles F. Jenkins
Vitascope was an early film projector first demonstrated in 1895 by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat.

Phantoscope

They had made modifications to Jenkins patented Phantoscope, which cast images via film and electric light onto a wall or screen.

Warner Bros.

Warner Bros. PicturesWarner BrothersWarner Bros. Entertainment
Vitascope was also used briefly as a trademark by Warner Brothers in 1930 for a widescreen process used for films such as Song of the Flame.

3D film

3D3-D3-D film
Warner was trying to compete with other widescreen processes such as Magnascope, Widevision, Natural Vision (no relation to the later 3-D film process), and Fox Grandeur.

70 mm Grandeur film

Fox GrandeurGrandeur70 mm "Grandeur" film
Warner was trying to compete with other widescreen processes such as Magnascope, Widevision, Natural Vision (no relation to the later 3-D film process), and Fox Grandeur.

Woodville Latham

WoodvilleLathamMajor Woodville Latham
Woodville Latham, with his sons, created the Eidoloscope projector which was presented publicly in April 1895.

William Kennedy Dickson

William DicksonWilliam K.L. DicksonWilliam Kennedy Laurie Dickson
William Kennedy Dickson apparently advised the Lathams on their machine, offering technical knowledge, a situation which led to Dickson leaving Edison's employment on April 2, 1895.

Auguste and Louis Lumière

Lumière brothersLumièreLouis Lumière
Other competitors soon displayed their own projection systems in American theaters, including the re-engineered Eidoloscope, which copied Vitascope innovations; the Lumière Cinématographe, which had already debuted in Europe in 1895; Birt Acres' Kineopticon; and the Biograph, which was marketed by the American Mutoscope Company.

Cinema of Japan

Japanese filmJapaneseJapan
The Vitascope and the Lumière Brothers' Cinematograph were first presented in Japan in early 1897, by businessmen such as Inabata Katsutaro.

Movie palace

movie palacesMovie palaces listpicture palace
These soon spread throughout the country as empty storefronts were equipped with chairs, a Vitascope projector, a muslin sheet on which the motion picture was exhibited, darkened windows, and a box by the door to service as a ticket office (literally, the "box office".) Storefront theatres, supplied with motion pictures made in Chicago and New York, spread throughout America.

1896 in film

1896
January - In the United States, the Vitascope film projector is designed by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat. Armat begins working with Thomas Edison to manufacture it.

List of years in film

filmyear in film
1896 – Pathé Frères is founded. In Britain, Birt Acres and Robert W. Paul developed their own film projector, the Theatrograph (later known as the Animatograph). Georges Méliès buys an English projector from Robert William Paul and shoots his first films. A projector called the Vitascope is designed by Charles Francis Jenkins. The first theater in the US dedicated exclusively to showing motion pictures is Vitascope Hall, established on Canal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana. The first screen kiss takes place between May Irwin and John Rice in The Kiss. The first female film director, Alice Guy-Blaché, presents The Cabbage Fairy. Cinema reaches India by way of The Lumière brothers ' Cinematography, unveiling six silent short films at the Watson Hotel in Bombay, namely Entry of Cinematographe, La Mer (Baignade en mer), L'Arrivée d'un Train en Gare de la Ciotat, A Demolition, Ladies & Soldiers on Wheels and Sortie de l'usine Lumière à Lyon. The tour of the Lumière brothers covers also London and New York.

Cinema of Bolivia

BoliviaBolivianBolivian cinematography
The first motion picture was shown in Bolivia on June 21, 1897, probably on a Vitascope.

Cinema of Chile

ChileanChilean cinemaChile
In the same year in Santiago, two new movie venues opened which both featured Edison's Vitascope, less popular than the Cinématographe.

Cinema of Venezuela

VenezuelaVenezuelan filmGolden Age
The early exhibition was facilitated by entrepreneur Luis Manuel Méndez, who had travelled to New York City in June 1896 and acquired a Vitascope, as well as licenses to use it for profit in both Venezuela and Colombia.

Mitchel H. Mark

Mitchel
Along with his younger brother, Moe Mark (1872–1932), Mitchel founded the Vitascope Theater (a special attraction of his Edisonia Hall in the Ellicott Square Building), one of the first permanent, purpose-built movie theaters in the world.

J. Stuart Blackton

James Stuart BlacktonJames Blackton
In 1896, Thomas Edison publicly demonstrated the Vitascope, one of the first film projectors, and Blackton was sent to interview Edison and provide drawings of how his films were made.

Elitch Theatre

Elitch Garden Stock CompanyElitch Gardens Theatre CompanyElitch Stock Theatre
In 1896, Edison's Vitascope was exhibited at the theatre showing the first films in Colorado.