Viverridae

viverridviverridscivetcivetsViverridae indet.viverrine
Viverridae is a family of small to medium-sized mammals, the viverrids, comprising 15 genera, which are subdivided into 38 species.wikipedia
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Felidae

wild catfelidfeline
Viverrids are the most primitive of all the families of feliform Carnivora and clearly less specialized than the Felidae.
Together with the Felidae, Viverridae, hyaenas and mongooses, they constitute the Feliformia.

Feliformia

feliformfeliformsFeloidea
Viverrids are the most primitive of all the families of feliform Carnivora and clearly less specialized than the Felidae.
However, omnivorous feliforms also exist, particularly in the family Viverridae.

Claw

talonsclawstalon
Viverrids have four or five toes on each foot and half-retractile claws.
Outside of the cat family, retractable claws are found only in certain species of the Viverridae (and the extinct Nimravidae).

Viverrinae

viverrinecivets
He subordinated the subfamilies Hemigalinae, Paradoxurinae, Prionodontinae, and Viverrinae to the Viverridae. DNA analysis based on 29 species of Carnivora, comprising 13 species of Viverrinae and three species representing Paradoxurus, Paguma and Hemigalinae, confirmed Pocock's assumption that the African linsang Poiana represents the sister-group of the genus Genetta.
The Viverrinae represent the largest subfamily within the Viverridae comprising five genera, which are subdivided into 22 species native to Africa and Southeast Asia.

Hemigalinae

He subordinated the subfamilies Hemigalinae, Paradoxurinae, Prionodontinae, and Viverrinae to the Viverridae. DNA analysis based on 29 species of Carnivora, comprising 13 species of Viverrinae and three species representing Paradoxurus, Paguma and Hemigalinae, confirmed Pocock's assumption that the African linsang Poiana represents the sister-group of the genus Genetta.
The Hemigalinae are a subfamily of the viverrids denominated and first described by John Edward Gray in 1864.

Viverra

civetviverrid
In 1821, Gray defined this family as consisting of the genera Viverra, Genetta, Herpestes, and Suricata.
The genus was subordinated to the viverrid family by John Edward Gray in 1821.

Paradoxurinae

palm civetparadoxurine
He subordinated the subfamilies Hemigalinae, Paradoxurinae, Prionodontinae, and Viverrinae to the Viverridae.
The Paradoxurinae are a subfamily of the viverrids that was denominated and first described by John Edward Gray in 1864.

Fossa (animal)

fossaCryptoprocta feroxfossas
In 1833, Edward Turner Bennett described the Malagasy fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox) and subordinated the Cryptoprocta to the Viverridae.
Its classification has been controversial because its physical traits resemble those of cats, yet other traits suggest a close relationship with viverrids (most civets and their relatives).

Carnivora

carnivorescarnivorancarnivorans
Viverrids are the most primitive of all the families of feliform Carnivora and clearly less specialized than the Felidae. DNA analysis based on 29 species of Carnivora, comprising 13 species of Viverrinae and three species representing Paradoxurus, Paguma and Hemigalinae, confirmed Pocock's assumption that the African linsang Poiana represents the sister-group of the genus Genetta.
Most species are rather plain in coloration, lacking the flashy spotted or rosetted coats like many species of felids and viverrids have.

Large Indian civet

Indian civetViverra zibethagreat Indian civet
The large Indian civet (Viverra zibetha) is a civet native to South and Southeast Asia.

Malayan civet

Malay civetViverra tangalungaMalay civet cat
The Malayan civet (Viverra tangalunga), also known as the Malay civet and Oriental civet, is a viverrid native to the Malay Peninsula and the islands of Sumatra, Bangka, Borneo, the Riau Archipelago, and the Philippines.

Eupleridae

euplerideupleridsMalagasy carnivoran
A molecular and morphological analysis based on DNA/DNA hybridization experiments suggests that Cryptoprocta does not belong within Viverridae, but is a member of the Eupleridae.
All species of Euplerinae were formerly classified as viverrids, while all species in the subfamily Galidiinae were classified as herpestids.

Malabar large-spotted civet

Malabar civetViverra civettinaV. civettina
The Malabar large-spotted civet (Viverra civettina), also known as the Malabar civet, is a viverrid endemic to the Western Ghats of India.

Large-spotted civet

Viverra megaspila
The large-spotted civet (Viverra megaspila) is a viverrid native to Southeast Asia that is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List.

Asian palm civet

common palm civetParadoxurus hermaphrodituspalm civet
The Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) is a viverrid native to South and Southeast Asia.

Masked palm civet

PagumaPaguma larvataHimalayan palm civet
DNA analysis based on 29 species of Carnivora, comprising 13 species of Viverrinae and three species representing Paradoxurus, Paguma and Hemigalinae, confirmed Pocock's assumption that the African linsang Poiana represents the sister-group of the genus Genetta.
The masked palm civet or gem-faced civet (Paguma larvata) is a civet species native to the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia.

Paradoxurus aureus

Golden wet-zone palm civetGolden wet zone palm civetP. aureus
Paradoxurus aureus, the golden palm civet, also called golden paradoxurus and golden wet-zone palm civet is a viverrid species native to Sri Lanka.

Paradoxurus montanus

Sri Lankan brown palm civetSri Lanka brown palm civet
Paradoxurus montanus, the Sri Lankan brown palm civet, is a viverrid species endemic to Sri Lanka where it is known as ශ්‍රී ලංකා බොර කලවැද්දා (Sri Lanka Bora Kalawedda) in Sinhala.

Common genet

small-spotted genetGenetta genettasmall spotted genet
The common genet (Genetta genetta) is a small viverrid indigenous to Africa that was introduced to southwestern Europe and the Balearic Islands.

Paradoxurus stenocephalus

Golden dry-zone palm civetGolden dry zone palm civetP. stenocephalus
Paradoxurus stenocephalus, or the golden dry-zone palm civet, is a viverrid species point endemic to Sri Lanka where it is known as ශ්‍රී ලංකා රන් කලවැද්දා in Sinhala.

Asiatic linsang

PrionodonPrionodontinaePrionodontidae
He subordinated the subfamilies Hemigalinae, Paradoxurinae, Prionodontinae, and Viverrinae to the Viverridae.
In 1864, John Edward Gray placed the genera Prionodon and Poiana in the tribe Prionodontina, as part of Viverridae.

Scent gland

scent glandscaudal glandinterdigital gland
Reginald Innes Pocock later redefined the family as containing a great number of highly diversified genera, and being susceptible of division into several subfamilies, based mainly on the structure of the feet and of some highly specialized scent glands, derived from the skin, which are present in most of the species and are situated in the region of the external generative organs.

Paradoxurus

palm civetpalm civets
DNA analysis based on 29 species of Carnivora, comprising 13 species of Viverrinae and three species representing Paradoxurus, Paguma and Hemigalinae, confirmed Pocock's assumption that the African linsang Poiana represents the sister-group of the genus Genetta.

Binturong

BearcatArctictisArctictis binturong
The binturong (Arctictis binturong), also known as bearcat, is a viverrid native to South and Southeast Asia.

Poiana (genus)

PoianalinsangAfrican linsang
The African linsangs also known as oyans are two species classified in the mammalian subfamily Viverrinae, in the family Viverridae.