Volodymyr-Volynskyi

Włodzimierz WołyńskiVolodymyrVolodymyr-VolynskyWlodzimierz WolynskiWłodzimierzLudmirVladimirVladimir-in-VolhyniaVladimir-VolynskyVolodymyr-Volyns'kyi
Volodymyr-Volynskyi (Володимир-Волинський, Włodzimierz Wołyński, Влади́мир-Волы́нский, לודמיר, Lodomeria) is a small city located in Volyn Oblast, in north-western Ukraine.wikipedia
340 Related Articles

Volhynia

VolynWołyńVolynia
The city is the historic centre of the region of Volhynia and the historic capital of the Principality of Volhynia. The Polish king began building a castle, destroyed by Lithuanians after 1370, and established a Catholic bishopric in Włodzimierz, later transferred to nearby Lutsk, which in the 15th century instead of Volodymyr became the leading city and capital of Volhynia.
Important cities include Lutsk, Rivne, Volodymyr-Volynskyi (Volodymyr), Iziaslav, and Novohrad-Volynskyi (Zviahel).

Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria

GaliciaAustrian GaliciaAustrian Poland
The mediaeval Latin name of the town "Lodomeria" became the namesake of the 19th century Austro-Hungarian Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, of which the town itself was not a part.
"Lodomeria", is also a Latinized form of Volodymyr-Volynskyi that was founded in the 10th century by Vladimir the Great and until the partitions of Poland was known simply as Volodymyr (Włodzimierz).

Principality of Volhynia

VolhyniaPrince of VolhyniaPrincipality of Vladimir
The city is the historic centre of the region of Volhynia and the historic capital of the Principality of Volhynia.
The capital of the principality as well as the largest and most important city of the region was Volodymyr.

Zymne Monastery

ZymneAssumption Cave MonasteryAssumption Monastery, Zimne
5 km south from Volodymyr is Zymne, where the oldest Orthodox Monastery in Volynia is located.
It is five kilometers south of Volodymyr-Volynskyi, Volyn Oblast, Ukraine.

Volodymyr-Volynskyi Raion

Volodymyr-VolynskyiVolodymyr-Volyns’kyi
Serving as the administrative centre of the Volodymyr-Volynskyi Raion, the city itself is also designated as a separate municipality within the oblast as the city of regional significance.
Its administrative center is the town of Volodymyr-Volynskyi, which is not part of the district and is incorporated separately as a town of oblast significance.

Lodomeria

The mediaeval Latin name of the town "Lodomeria" became the namesake of the 19th century Austro-Hungarian Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, of which the town itself was not a part.
This refers either directly to the ruler of Kievan Rus, Vladimir the Great (therefore meaning the lands conquered by him), or else refers to the city he founded and named for himself in CE 987, Wlodimer (or Wolodymyr).

Volyn Oblast

VolynVolyn regionVolhynia
Volodymyr-Volynskyi (Володимир-Волинський, Włodzimierz Wołyński, Влади́мир-Волы́нский, לודמיר, Lodomeria) is a small city located in Volyn Oblast, in north-western Ukraine.
The Volyn Oblast is administratively subdivided into 16 raions (districts), as well as 4 cities (municipalities) which are directly subordinate to the oblast government: Kovel, Novovolynsk, Volodymyr-Volynskyi, and the administrative center of the oblast, Lutsk.

Lutsk

ŁuckLutzkLuck
The Polish king began building a castle, destroyed by Lithuanians after 1370, and established a Catholic bishopric in Włodzimierz, later transferred to nearby Lutsk, which in the 15th century instead of Volodymyr became the leading city and capital of Volhynia.
The town served as the capital of the Principality of Halych-Volynia (founded 1199) until the rise of Volodymyr-Volynsky.

First Mongol invasion of Poland

Mongol invasion of Poland1240/1241Mongol invasion
In 1241, the Mongol army gathered near the town before the first Mongol invasion of Poland.
Mongol tumen, moving from recently conquered Volodymyr-Volynskyi in Kievan Rus, first sacked Lublin, then besieged and sacked Sandomierz (which fell on 13 February).

Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia

Galicia-VolhyniaGalicia–VolhyniaHalych-Volhynia
By the 13th century the city became part of Galicia–Volhynia as one of the most important trading towns in the region.
He founded the city of Volodimir (Volynskii) and later Christianized the locals.

Theognostus of Kiev

TheognostusSt. TheognostusMetropolitan Feognost
In the 14th century, Metropolitan Theognostus of all Rus' resided in the city for several years before moving to Moscow.
He chose Moscow as his primary seat after he had lived for several years in Volodymyr-Volynskyi in Volynia.

Volhynian Voivodeship (1569–1795)

Volhynian VoivodeshipWołyń Voivodeshipvoivode of Wołyń
From 1566 to 1795 it was part of the Volhynian Voivodeship.
Volhynian Voivodeship was divided into three counties: Luck, Wlodzimierz and Krzemieniec.

Batu Khan

BatuKhan BatuMongol invasion
Upon the conquest of Batu Khan in 1240, the city was subordinated to the Mongol Empire together with other Ruthenian principalities.
Despite fierce resistance by Danylo of Halych, Batu Khan managed to take the two principal capitals of his land, Halych and Volodymyr-Volyns'kyi.

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
Volodymyr-Volynskyi (Володимир-Волинський, Włodzimierz Wołyński, Влади́мир-Волы́нский, לודמיר, Lodomeria) is a small city located in Volyn Oblast, in north-western Ukraine.
Several buildings were reconstructed during the late-19th century, including the in Volodymyr-Volynskyi, built in 1160 and reconstructed in 1896–1900, the, built in 1201 with reconstruction done in the late 1940s, and the Golden gates in Kiev, built in 1037 and reconstructed in 1982.

Tadeusz Kościuszko

KościuszkoTadeusz KosciuszkoThaddeus Kosciuszko
On July 17, 1792, the Battle of Włodzimierz took place in the vicinity of the town: a numerically inferior Polish force led by Tadeusz Kościuszko defeated the Russian army.
) The Polish withdrawal continued, and on July 7 Kościuszko's forces fought a delaying battle against the Russians at Volodymyr-Volynskyi (the Battle of Włodzimierz).

Władysław Siemaszko

According to later research by Władysław Siemaszko and Ewa Siemaszko, a total of 111 Poles was killed in a dozen UPA attacks in Włodzimierz.
The Siemaszko family had lived in Volhynia since January Uprising of 1863, after which Wladyslaw's grandfather bought some land from the Ukrainians in the area of Volodymyr-Volynskyi.

Royal city in Poland

royal cityroyal townroyal city of Poland
It was a royal city of Poland.

Ukrainian Insurgent Army

UPAOUN-UPAUkrainian nationalists
In 1943, occupied Włodzimierz became a shelter for Poles escaping the genocide carried out by Ukrainian nationalists of the UPA.
On that day, UPA units surrounded and attacked 99 Polish villages and settlements in three counties – Kowel, Horochów, and Włodzimierz Wołyński.

Magdeburg rights

Magdeburg Lawcity rightsMagdeburg city rights
In the meantime the city was given Magdeburg town rights in 1431.
Notable Polish, Lithuanian and today's Belarus and Ukraine towns governed on the basis of the location privilege known as the "settlement with German law" issued by Polish and Grand Duchy of Lithuania landlords (since the 16th to 18th centuries by Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth landlords) included Biecz, Frysztak, Sandomierz, Kraków, Kurów, Minsk, Polotsk, Poznań, Ropczyce, Łódź, Wrocław, Szczecin (which was not a part of Poland when granted town rights; they were given by a Pomeranian landlord), Złotoryja, Vilnius, Trakai, Kaunas, Hrodna, Kiev, Lviv, Czernowitz (currently Chernivtsi in Ukraine), Brody, Lutsk, Volodymyr-Volynskyi, Sanok, Sniatyn, Nizhyn among many hundreds of others.

Kingdom of Poland (1025–1385)

Kingdom of PolandPolandPolish
In 1349 King Casimir the Great captured the city, and subsequently it became part of the Kingdom of Poland.
At that time, Poland started to expand to the east and through a series of military campaigns between 1340 and 1366, Casimir annexed the Halych–Volodymyr area of Rus'.

Volodymyr-Volynsky Historical Museum

There also exists Volodymyr-Volynsky Historical Museum, an architectural monument of the 19th century.
The community of Volodymyr-Volynskyi established this Collection preserve history and promotescientific research.

Josaphat Kuntsevych

JosaphatSaint JosaphatSaint Josaphat Kuntsevych
He was born Ioann Kuntsevych in 1580 or 1584 in Volodymyr, Volhynian Voivodeship, in the Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown (now in Ukraine).

Wołyń Voivodeship (1921–1939)

Wołyń VoivodeshipVolhynian VoivodeshipWołyń Voivodeship (1921–39)
In the interbellum the city was a seat of a powiat within the Volhynian Voivodeship of Poland and an important garrison was located there.
It was initially divided into the counties of Dubno, Horochow, Kowel, Krzemieniec, Luboml, Łuck, Ostróg, Równe and Włodzimierz Wołyński.

Massacres of Poles in Volhynia and Eastern Galicia

Massacres of Poles in VolhyniaVolhynian GenocideVolhynian massacres
In 1943, occupied Włodzimierz became a shelter for Poles escaping the genocide carried out by Ukrainian nationalists of the UPA.
By June 1943, the attacks had spread to the counties of Kowel, Włodzimierz Wołyński, and Horochów, and in August to Luboml county.

Jerzy Antczak

Jerzy Antczak (born 25 December 1929, in Włodzimierz Wołyński) is a Polish film director.