Volume overload

left ventricular volume overload
Volume overload refers to the state of one of the chambers of the heart in which too large a volume of blood exists within it for it to function efficiently.wikipedia
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Mitral insufficiency

mitral regurgitationmitral valve diseasemitral valve regurgitation
Over time, however, there may be decompensation and patients can develop volume overload (congestive heart failure).

Preload (cardiology)

preloadcardiac preloadpre-load
Ventricular volume overload is approximately equivalent to an excessively high preload.

Aortic insufficiency

aortic regurgitationaortic valve insufficiencyAortic valve regurgitation
Aortic insufficiency causes both volume overload (elevated preload) and pressure overload (elevated afterload) of the heart.

Patent ductus arteriosus

ductus arteriosusductus arteriosus, patentAdult patent ductus arteriosus

Ventricular septal defect

hole in the heartVSDventricular
First, the circuitous refluxing of blood causes volume overload on the left ventricle.

U wave

U wavesU-Wave
Left ventricular volume overload may produce inverted u waves on the electrocardiogram.
An inverted U wave may represent myocardial ischemia (and especially appears to have a high positive predictive accuracy for left anterior descending coronary artery disease ) or left ventricular volume overload.

Cavernous liver hemangioma

hepatic hemangiomaGiant hepatic haemangioma
It may also lead to left ventricular volume overload and heart failure due to the increase in cardiac output which it causes.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
Volume overload refers to the state of one of the chambers of the heart in which too large a volume of blood exists within it for it to function efficiently.

Ventricle (heart)

ventricleleft ventricleright ventricle
Ventricular volume overload is approximately equivalent to an excessively high preload.

Heart failure

congestive heart failurecardiac failurechronic heart failure
It is a cause of cardiac failure.

Frank–Starling law

Frank–Starling law of the heartFrank-Starling mechanismFrank–Starling mechanism
In accordance with the Frank–Starling law of the heart, the myocardium contracts more powerfully as the end-diastolic volume increases.

Cardiac muscle

myocardiumheart musclemyocardial
In accordance with the Frank–Starling law of the heart, the myocardium contracts more powerfully as the end-diastolic volume increases.

End-diastolic volume

end diastolic volumeend-diastolicGEDV
In accordance with the Frank–Starling law of the heart, the myocardium contracts more powerfully as the end-diastolic volume increases.

Myofibril

actomyosinmyofibrilsmyofibrillar
Stretching of the myofibrils in cardiac muscle causes them to contract more powerfully due to a greater number of cross-bridges being formed between the myofibrils within cardiac myocytes.

Cardiac muscle cell

cardiomyocytescardiomyocytecardiac myocytes
Stretching of the myofibrils in cardiac muscle causes them to contract more powerfully due to a greater number of cross-bridges being formed between the myofibrils within cardiac myocytes.

Afterload

post-loadwork harder to pump the same volume of bloodworkload
Different mechanisms are involved depending on the cause, however the common theme is that of a high cardiac output with a low or normal afterload.

Valvular heart disease

heart valve diseaseCardiac Valve Diseasevalve disease
The output may be high due to the inefficiency in valve disease, or it may be high due to shunting of blood in left-to-right shunts and arteriovenous malformations.

Shunt (medical)

shuntshuntsshunting
The output may be high due to the inefficiency in valve disease, or it may be high due to shunting of blood in left-to-right shunts and arteriovenous malformations.

Electrocardiography

electrocardiogramECGEKG
Left ventricular volume overload may produce inverted u waves on the electrocardiogram.

Arteriovenous malformation

arteriovenous malformationsAVMAVMs
The output may be high due to the inefficiency in valve disease, or it may be high due to shunting of blood in left-to-right shunts and arteriovenous malformations.