Vyacheslav Molotov

MolotovViacheslav MolotovV.M. MolotovV. M. MolotovVyacheslav Mikhailovich MolotovHammerV. Molotovforeign minister MolotovPremier MolotovSoviet Foreign Minister Molotov
Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov (né Skryabin; (OS 25 February) 9 March 1890 – 8 November 1986) was a Soviet politician and diplomat, an Old Bolshevik, and a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s, when he rose to power as a protégé of Joseph Stalin.wikipedia
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First Deputy Premier of the Soviet Union

First Deputy ChairmanFirst Deputy PremierFirst Deputies
He served as First Deputy Premier from 1942 to 1957, when he was dismissed from the Presidium of the Central Committee by Nikita Khrushchev.
At over seventeen years, Vyacheslav Molotov spent the longest time in office, and held his position through most of Joseph Stalin's chairmanship, as well as through the chairmanships of Georgy Malenkov and Nikolai Bulganin.

Polina Zhemchuzhina

Polina ZhemtshuzhinaMadame MolotovPolina Molotova
He was voted in as a non-voting member of the Politburo in 1921 and held the office of Responsible Secretary and also married Soviet politician Polina Zhemchuzhina.
Polina Semyonovna Zhemchuzhina (born Perl Semyonovna Karpovskaya; 27 February 1897 – 1 April 1970) was a Soviet politician and the wife of the Soviet foreign minister Vyacheslav Molotov.

Katyn massacre

Katyń massacreKatynKatyn Forest
He was aware of the Katyn massacre committed by the Soviet authorities during this period. On 5 March 1940, Lavrentiy Beria gave Molotov, along with Anastas Mikoyan, Kliment Voroshilov and Stalin, a note proposing the execution of 25,700 Polish officers and anti-Soviets, in what has become known as the Katyn massacre.
On 5 March 1940, pursuant to a note to Joseph Stalin from Beria, six members of the Soviet Politburo — Stalin, Vyacheslav Molotov, Lazar Kaganovich, Kliment Voroshilov, Anastas Mikoyan, and Mikhail Kalinin — signed an order to execute 25,700 Polish "nationalists and counterrevolutionaries" kept at camps and prisons in occupied western Ukraine and Belarus.

Nikita Khrushchev

KhrushchevNikita S. KhrushchevNikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
He served as First Deputy Premier from 1942 to 1957, when he was dismissed from the Presidium of the Central Committee by Nikita Khrushchev.
These sessions, which Beria, Malenkov, Khrushchev, Kaganovich, Kliment Voroshilov, Vyacheslav Molotov, and Nikolai Bulganin, who comprised Stalin's inner circle, attended, began with showings of cowboy movies favoured by Stalin.

Joseph Stalin

StalinJosef StalinJosif Stalin
Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov (né Skryabin; (OS 25 February) 9 March 1890 – 8 November 1986) was a Soviet politician and diplomat, an Old Bolshevik, and a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s, when he rose to power as a protégé of Joseph Stalin. Molotov joined the editorial staff of a new underground Bolshevik newspaper called Pravda, meeting Joseph Stalin for the first time in association with the project.
Stalin was now the party's supreme leader, although he was not the head of government, a task he entrusted to key ally Vyacheslav Molotov.

Vologda

Vologda, Vologda OblastVologda KremlinVologda lace
He was arrested in 1909 and spent two years in exile in Vologda.
In the 19th–20th centuries, such persons as Joseph Stalin, Vyacheslav Molotov (later the Minister of Foreign Affairs), Nikolai Berdyaev (the famous Russian philosopher), Boris Savinkov (later known as a successful terrorist), Mariya Ulyanova, and Alexander Bogdanov were sent to Vologda.

Pravda

Soviet pressdefunct newspaperMcPravda
Molotov joined the editorial staff of a new underground Bolshevik newspaper called Pravda, meeting Joseph Stalin for the first time in association with the project.
The original editors of the newly reincarnated Pravda, Vyacheslav Molotov and Alexander Shlyapnikov, were opposed to the liberal Russian Provisional Government.

Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

Central CommitteeCPSU Central CommitteeCentral Committee of the CPSU
Lenin recalled him to Moscow in 1921, elevating him to full membership of the Central Committee and Orgburo, and putting him in charge of the party secretariat.
Not all conflicts were below the surface, and Grigory Ordzhonikidze, the People's Commissar for Heavy Industry openly disputed with Vyacheslav Molotov, the Chairman of the Council of the People's Commissars, about the rate of economic growth.

Maxim Litvinov

LitvinovMaxim LitvinoffMaksim Litvinov
In May 1939, Maxim Litvinov, the People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs, was dismissed; it is not certain why Litvinov was dismissed but it was discussed in Ch.
In May 1939 Litvinov was sacked because he did not believe the West was serious about confronting Adolf Hitler and was replaced with Vyacheslav Molotov, who had to continue negotiations about an anti-Hitler alliance.

Kliment Voroshilov

VoroshilovMarshal VoroshilovKlim Voroshilov
Molotov became a leading figure in the "Stalinist centre" of the party, which also included Kliment Voroshilov and Sergo Ordzhonikidze. On 5 March 1940, Lavrentiy Beria gave Molotov, along with Anastas Mikoyan, Kliment Voroshilov and Stalin, a note proposing the execution of 25,700 Polish officers and anti-Soviets, in what has become known as the Katyn massacre. The purges were carried out by Stalin's successive police chiefs; Nikolai Yezhov was the chief organiser, and Kliment Voroshilov, Lazar Kaganovich, and Molotov were intimately involved in the processes.
Voroshilov personally signed 185 documented execution lists, fourth among the Soviet leadership after Molotov, Stalin and Kaganovich.

German–Soviet Axis talks

discussions of the Soviet Union potentially becoming the fourth Axis PowerGerman-Soviet talksdiscussions of the Soviet Union potentially becoming an Axis Power
In November 1940, Stalin sent Molotov to Berlin to meet Ribbentrop and Adolf Hitler.
The negotiations, which occurred during the era of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, included a two-day Berlin conference between Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov, Adolf Hitler and German Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop, followed by both countries trading written proposed agreements.

Great Purge

Great TerrorStalinist purgespurges
Kirov's death triggered a second crisis, the Great Purge.
Vyacheslav Molotov and Lazar Kaganovich, participants in the repression as members of the Politburo, maintained this justification throughout the purge; they each signed many death lists.

Lavrentiy Beria

Lavrenty BeriaBeriaLavrenti Beria
On 5 March 1940, Lavrentiy Beria gave Molotov, along with Anastas Mikoyan, Kliment Voroshilov and Stalin, a note proposing the execution of 25,700 Polish officers and anti-Soviets, in what has become known as the Katyn massacre.
In this dual capacity, he formed a troika alongside Georgy Malenkov and Vyacheslav Molotov that briefly led the country in Stalin's place.

Petlyakov Pe-8

Pe-8Tupolev TB-7TB-7
This risky flight, in a high altitude Tupolev TB-7 bomber, flew over German-occupied Denmark and the North Sea.
Its primary mission, however, was to attack German airfields, rail yards and other rear-area facilities at night, although one was used to fly the People's Commissar of Foreign Affairs (Foreign Minister) Vyacheslav Molotov from Moscow to the United States in 1942.

Old Bolshevik

Old BolsheviksBolshevik old guardleaders of the Bolshevik Revolution
Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov (né Skryabin; (OS 25 February) 9 March 1890 – 8 November 1986) was a Soviet politician and diplomat, an Old Bolshevik, and a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s, when he rose to power as a protégé of Joseph Stalin.

Milovan Đilas

Milovan DjilasDjilas, MilovanDjilas
However, Milovan Djilas claimed that Molotov "drank more than Stalin" and did not note his vegetarianism despite attending several banquets with him.
During this time he met with Georgi Dimitrov, Vyacheslav Molotov and Joseph Stalin, among others.

Moscow City Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

Moscow City CommitteeFirst Secretary of the Moscow Communist PartyFirst Secretary
In 1928, Molotov replaced Nikolai Uglanov as First Secretary of the Moscow Communist Party and held that position until 15 August 1929.

Leon Trotsky

TrotskyLev TrotskyLeo Trotsky
His Responsible Secretaryship was criticised by Lenin and Leon Trotsky, with Lenin noting his "shameful bureaucratism" and stupid behaviour.
Krestinsky's place in the secretariat was taken by Vyacheslav Molotov.

Winter War

Soviet-Finnish WarSoviet invasion of FinlandRusso-Finnish War
In the Winter War that ensued, a combination of fierce Finnish resistance and Soviet mismanagement resulted in Finland losing parts of its territory, but not its independence.
On 31 October, Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov announced Soviet demands in public in the Supreme Soviet.

Lazar Kaganovich

KaganovichLazar Moiseyevich KaganovichLazar
The purges were carried out by Stalin's successive police chiefs; Nikolai Yezhov was the chief organiser, and Kliment Voroshilov, Lazar Kaganovich, and Molotov were intimately involved in the processes.
Kaganovich (together with Vyacheslav Molotov) participated with the All-Ukrainian Party Conference of 1930 and were given the task of implementation of the collectivization policy that caused a catastrophic 1932–33 famine (known as the Holodomor in Ukraine).

Andrey Vyshinsky

Andrei VyshinskyAndrei VishinskyAndrei Y. Vishinsky
He retained his place as a leading Soviet diplomat and politician until March 1949, when he fell out of Stalin's favour and lost the foreign affairs ministry leadership to Andrei Vyshinsky.
He was the Soviet Foreign Minister from 1949 to 1953, after having served as Deputy Foreign Minister under Vyacheslav Molotov since 1940.

Alexander Scriabin

ScriabinSkriabinSkrjabin
Contrary to a commonly repeated error, he was not related to the composer Alexander Scriabin.
Scriabin was not a relative of Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs Vyacheslav Molotov, whose birth name was Vyacheslav Skryabin.

General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

General SecretarySoviet General SecretaryFirst Secretary
He was voted in as a non-voting member of the Politburo in 1921 and held the office of Responsible Secretary and also married Soviet politician Polina Zhemchuzhina.

Nikolai Bukharin

BukharinNikolay BukharinBukharin, Nikolai
On the advice of Molotov and Nikolai Bukharin, the Central Committee decided to reduce Lenin's work hours.
While Anastas Mikoyan and Vyacheslav Molotov later claimed that Bukharin was never tortured and his letters from prison do not give the suggestion that he was tortured, it is also known that his interrogators were instructed with the order: "beating permitted".