WNBC (AM)

WNBCWEAFWNBC-AMWNBC radioWRCA66 WNBCWNBC 660 AMBob Sherman (radio executive)W-E-A-F New YorkWEAF/WRCA/WNBC
WNBC (660 kHz) was a commercial AM radio station licensed to New York City from 1922 to 1988.wikipedia
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Sports radio

Sportssports talkall-sports
Its former frequency has since been occupied by Entercom-owned all-sports WFAN.
Hosted by Bill Mazer, the first sports talk radio show in history launched in March 1964 on New York's WNBC (AM).

Flagship (broadcasting)

flagship stationflagshipflagship stations
For most of its history, it was the flagship station of the NBC Radio Network.

Blue Network

NBC Blue NetworkNBC BlueBlue
The other chain was the NBC Blue Network, whose programming originated at WJZ (now WABC), also owned by RCA.
Nevertheless, the WJZ network sought to compete toe-to-toe with the AT&T network, which was built around a different New York station, WEAF (today's WFAN).

AT&T Corporation

AT&TAmerican Telephone and Telegraph CompanyAmerican Telephone & Telegraph
WNBC signed on for the first time on March 2, 1922, as WEAF, owned by AT&T Western Electric.
It established station WEAF in New York as what was termed a toll station.

Bill Mazer

Hosts included genial morning-drive companion Big Wilson, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson announcer Ed McMahon, New York-based actor Robert Alda, NBC Radio comedian/satirist Mort Sahl, the witty mid-morning game-show host ("Fortune Phone") Sterling Yates, late-morning talk radio provocateur Joe Pyne, midday voices Lee Leonard and later Jim Gearhart, sports talk host Bill Mazer, plus late-nighters Brad Crandall (later of NFL Films) and Long John Nebel.
He is also recognized as the host of the first sports talk radio show in history that launched in March 1964 on WNBC (AM).

Brad Crandall

Brad CrandelBradley Crandall
Hosts included genial morning-drive companion Big Wilson, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson announcer Ed McMahon, New York-based actor Robert Alda, NBC Radio comedian/satirist Mort Sahl, the witty mid-morning game-show host ("Fortune Phone") Sterling Yates, late-morning talk radio provocateur Joe Pyne, midday voices Lee Leonard and later Jim Gearhart, sports talk host Bill Mazer, plus late-nighters Brad Crandall (later of NFL Films) and Long John Nebel.
Bradley Crandall (born Robert Lee Bradley; August 6, 1927 – March 14, 1991) was an American radio personality, voice-over announcer, and film narrator, best known for his radio show on WNBC in New York City, which aired from March 1964 to September 1971.

WABC (AM)

WABCWJZWABC-AM
The other chain was the NBC Blue Network, whose programming originated at WJZ (now WABC), also owned by RCA.
This first radio network was called the "WEAF chain", named after the flagship AT&T station (now WNBC), located in New York City.

Don Imus

ImusDon Imus controversyDon Imus Rutgers controversy
Don Imus was hired in December 1971, giving New York its first exposure to the shock jock genre.
Three years later, he landed the morning spot at WNBC in New York City; he was fired in 1977.

Ted Brown (radio)

Ted Brown
Hosts during this transition back to music included Wilson, Jack Spector (formerly of WMCA), Jack Hayes, Charlie Brown and later Ted Brown, hired away from then-dominant MOR station WNEW.
Theodore David Brown (May 5, 1924 – March 20, 2005) was a radio personality who worked at several stations in New York City including WMGM, WNEW and WNBC during the 1950s and 1960s, the golden age of AM radio.

Long John Nebel

John NebelLong John" Nebel
Hosts included genial morning-drive companion Big Wilson, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson announcer Ed McMahon, New York-based actor Robert Alda, NBC Radio comedian/satirist Mort Sahl, the witty mid-morning game-show host ("Fortune Phone") Sterling Yates, late-morning talk radio provocateur Joe Pyne, midday voices Lee Leonard and later Jim Gearhart, sports talk host Bill Mazer, plus late-nighters Brad Crandall (later of NFL Films) and Long John Nebel.
In 1962, WNBC offered Nebel more than $100,000 per year (if not a record sum paid to a radio personality at the time, then very nearly so) to begin broadcasting from their station, and he accepted the offer.

Bill Cullen

On weekends, WNBC aired almost all of the NBC Radio Network's Monitor program, which featured many of WNBC's own hosts as well as the already established lineup holding court at NBC's Radio Central (Gene Rayburn, Henry Morgan, Bill Cullen, David Wayne, Kitty Carlisle and Wayne Howell).
After a brief stint at WNEW in 1951, he hosted a popular morning show at WRCA radio from 1955 to 1961.

Howard Stern

SternHoward Stern on DemandThe Howard Stern Show
In the fall of 1982 to much fanfare, Howard Stern was brought in from WWDC-FM in Washington, D.C., to do afternoon drive.
From 1976 to 1982, Stern developed his on-air personality through morning positions at WRNW in Briarcliff Manor, New York, WCCC in Hartford, Connecticut, WWWW in Detroit, Michigan, and WWDC in Washington, D.C. Stern worked afternoons at WNBC in New York City from 1982 until his firing in 1985.

Soupy Sales

The Soupy Sales ShowLunch with Soupy SalesSoupy
In the spring of 1985, former children's television show host Soupy Sales started a talk-intensive program in middays, replacing the Frank Reed all-request radio show, heard 1984–1985 weekdays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Soupy combined comedy, games, and talk, while playing 6 to 8 songs per hour.
During the 1980s, Sales hosted his own show on WNBC-AM in New York City.

Bruce Morrow

Cousin BrucieCousin Brucie" MorrowBruce "Cousin Brucie" Morrow
Thus they brought in Murray "the K" Kaufman in 1972, and Wolfman Jack opposite WABC's Bruce "Cousin Brucie" Morrow in 1973.
Morrow worked for WABC for 13 years and 4,014 broadcasts until August 1974, when he transferred to rival radio station WNBC; after three years there, he quit performance to team with entrepreneur Robert F.X. Sillerman to become the owner of the Sillerman Morrow group of radio stations, which included WALL; WKGL, now WRRV, in Middletown, New York; WJJB, later WCZX, in Poughkeepsie, New York; WHMP in Northampton, Massachusetts; WOCB in West Yarmouth, Massachusetts; WRAN (now dark) New Jersey 1510 in Randolph, New Jersey; and television station WATL Atlanta.

WCBS-FM

WCBSWCBS FMits FM sister station
Other new DJs included Norm N. Nite who arrived from WCBS-FM in 1975.
Also in the 1980s, after WABC and later WNBC (AM) abandoned music in favor of talk, WCBS-FM began employing many disc jockeys who were widely known on other New York City stations (and sometimes nationally), most notably Musicradio WABC alumni Ron Lundy, Dan Ingram, Bruce "Cousin Brucie" Morrow, Chuck Leonard and Harry Harrison, as well as former WMCA "Good Guys" Dan Daniels and Jack Spector.

Robert Pittman (media executive)

Bob PittmanRobert W. PittmanRobert Pittman
In 1977, Bob Pittman was hired as WNBC's new Program Director, replacing Mel Phillips.
He was an announcer in a number of cities and then successfully programmed radio stations in Pittsburgh, Chicago (WMAQ AM 670 and WKQX FM) and finally at the NBC flagship station, WNBC (AM), in New York when he was 23 years old.

Wolfman Jack

Robert Weston SmithBob "Wolfman Jack" SmithThe Wolfman Jack Show
Thus they brought in Murray "the K" Kaufman in 1972, and Wolfman Jack opposite WABC's Bruce "Cousin Brucie" Morrow in 1973.
In a deal promoted by Don Kelley, The Wolfman was paid handsomely to join WNBC in New York in August 1973, the same month that American Graffiti premiered, and the station did a huge advertising campaign in local newspapers stating that the Wolfman would propel their ratings over those of their main competitor, WABC, which had "Cousin Brucie" (Bruce Morrow).

Jane Dornacker

At approximately 4:42 PM on October 22, 1986, the station's "N-Copter" traffic helicopter crashed into the Hudson River, killing traffic reporter Jane Dornacker and severely injuring pilot Bill Pate.
In 1986, while working for WNBC 660 AM Radio in New York City (which became WFAN in 1988), Dornacker was aboard during two unrelated crashes of the helicopters leased to WNBC.

Kevin Metheny

Kenny "Pig Vomit" RushtonKevin "Pig Virus" Metheny
In 1981, John Lund left WNBC to begin his consulting and research firm in San Francisco, and the station's assistant PD, R.E. "Buzz" Brindle served as interim program director until Kevin Metheny was hired in the late Spring.
Metheny was named Program Director of The National Broadcasting Company's WNBC (NYC) in 1980.

Wayne Howell

On weekends, WNBC aired almost all of the NBC Radio Network's Monitor program, which featured many of WNBC's own hosts as well as the already established lineup holding court at NBC's Radio Central (Gene Rayburn, Henry Morgan, Bill Cullen, David Wayne, Kitty Carlisle and Wayne Howell).
Among his many assignments for NBC, Howell also appeared regularly as a personality on NBC's New York flagship radio station, WNBC (AM), from the 1940s through the mid-1960s.

Dave Sims

That summer, with radiocasts of the New York Knicks and New York Rangers, WNBC added Sports Night on weekday evenings, initially hosted by Jack Spector until early in 1986 and then Dave Sims after that.
Moving to radio, Sims became the host of WNBC's SportsNight in the mid-1980s (replacing Jack Spector), a five-hour nightly sports call-in show that was a precursor to the all-sports talk format of WFAN.

WNYL (FM)

WXRKWNYLWNOW-FM
After Stern's dismissal and subsequent debut on rival New York station 92.3 K-Rock, WNBC's ratings plummeted, and they were under a two-share by the spring of 1986.
After being fired from WNBC in October 1985, Howard Stern signed on to do afternoons, and initially combined music with talk, but on February 18, 1986, Stern took over the morning slot.

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
RCA then formed the National Broadcasting Company, which operated two radio chains.
During a period of early broadcast business consolidation, radio manufacturer Radio Corporation of America (RCA) acquired New York City radio station WEAF from American Telephone & Telegraph (AT&T).

WPLJ

WABC-FMWPLJ-FMNew York City
Then, in 1983 with ABC-owned WPLJ evolving to a Contemporary Hit Radio (CHR) format, as well as WHTZ's debut with the same format, WNBC began to lose some listeners.
(Competitor WNBC had been a de facto AM top-40 station while WYNY had been the de facto FM hits station throughout the early 1980s, playing many current songs as part of its hot adult contemporary format).

Alan Colmes

Allan Colmes
On February 23, the music intensive AC mix with various people was dropped on overnights in favor of Alan Colmes, who would also do a talk intensive show and only six songs per hour.
He developed his radio career in the Northeast, eventually working at stations such as WABC, WNBC, WHN, WMCA and WEVD in New York, WNHC in New Haven, Connecticut, and WEZE and WZLX in Boston.