WNYW

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WNYW, virtual channel 5 (UHF digital channel 27), is the flagship station of the Fox television network, licensed to New York, New York, United States.wikipedia
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Fox Broadcasting Company

FoxFox networkFox.com
WNYW, virtual channel 5 (UHF digital channel 27), is the flagship station of the Fox television network, licensed to New York, New York, United States.
The network is headquartered at 1211 Avenue of the Americas in New York City, with additional offices at the Fox Broadcasting Center (also in New York) and at the Fox Television Center in Los Angeles.

WWOR-TV

WOR-TVWWORWOR
The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with Secaucus, New Jersey-licensed MyNetworkTV flagship WWOR-TV (channel 9).
The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with New York-licensed Fox flagship WNYW (channel 5).

Allen B. DuMont

Allen DuMontAllen B. Du MontAllen Balcom DuMont
The station traces its history to 1938, when television set and equipment manufacturer Allen B. DuMont founded experimental station W2XVT in Passaic, New Jersey (whose call sign was changed to W2XWV when it moved to Manhattan in 1940).
In 1946, DuMont founded the first television network to be licensed, the DuMont Television Network, initially by linking station WABD (named for DuMont) in New York City to station W3XWT, which later became WTTG, in Washington, D.C. (WTTG was named for Dr. Thomas T. Goldsmith, DuMont's Vice President of Research, and his best friend.) DuMont's successes in television picture tubes, TV sets and components and his involvement in commercial TV broadcasting made him the first millionaire in the business.

DuMont Television Network

DuMontDuMont NetworkDMN
These hookups were the beginning of the DuMont Television Network, the world's first licensed commercial television network (although NBC was feeding a few programs and special events from their New York station WNBT to outlets in Philadelphia and Schenectady as early as 1940).
In 1944, W2XWV became WABD (a callsign derived from DuMont's initials) and moved to channel 5 in 1945, the third commercial television station in New York.

Independent station (North America)

independent stationIndependentindependent stations
It decided to shut down the network's operations and operate WABD and its Washington, D.C., station WTTG (also operating on channel 5) as independent stations.
Some stations in larger markets (such as WGN-TV in Chicago; KTLA, KCOP-TV and KHJ-TV in Los Angeles; KWGN-TV in Denver; and (W)WOR-TV, WPIX and WNEW-TV in New York City) ventured into local news broadcasts, usually airing at 10:00 p.m. in the Eastern and Pacific time zones, and 9:00 p.m. in the Central and Mountain time zones.

WNEW-FM

WNEWWWFS102.7
Channel 5 gained sister stations in 1957, when DuMont purchased WNEW (1130 AM, now WBBR) in April of that year, and the construction permit for WHFI, which went on the air as WNEW-FM (102.7 FM) when it began operations in August 1958.
Between 1958 and 1986, the station shared the WNEW call sign with former sister AM station WNEW (1130 kHz) and television station WNEW-TV (channel 5), with all being owned by Metromedia.

KDKA-TV

KDKAWDTVPittsburgh
DuMont had previously sold WDTV in Pittsburgh to the locally-based Westinghouse Electric Corporation arguably hastening DuMont's demise.
It was the 51st television station in the U.S., the third and last DuMont-owned station to sign on the air, behind WABD (now WNYW) in New York City and WTTG in Washington, D.C., and the first owned-and-operated station in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

WTTG

WTTG-TVWTTG 5Fox 5
Soon after channel 5 received its commercial license, DuMont Laboratories began a series of experimental coaxial cable hookups between WABD and W3XWT, a DuMont-owned experimental station in Washington, D.C. (now WTTG).
Later in 1945, DuMont Laboratories began a series of experimental coaxial cable hookups between W3XWT and its other television station, WABD (now WNYW) in New York City.

The Jerry Lewis MDA Labor Day Telethon

Jerry Lewis MDA TelethonMDA Labor Day TelethonMDA Show of Strength
WNEW-TV also originated The Jerry Lewis MDA Labor Day Telethon in 1966, and broadcast the program annually until 1986 when it moved to future sister station WWOR-TV, where it aired through 2012.
The MDAA benefit broadcasts first originated from a variety of locations in New York City in 1954, as local telethons seen exclusively on WABD (later WNEW-TV and now WNYW) or WABC-TV, who would donate their broadcast time for the event.

Sandy Becker

The Sandy Becker Show
In the early 1960s, WNEW-TV produced children's shows such as Romper Room (until 1966, when it moved to WOR-TV), The Sandy Becker Show and The Sonny Fox Show, which was later known as Wonderama.
The best known of these was The Sandy Becker Show, which ran from 1955 to 1968 on Channel 5 WABD-TV and WNEW-TV.

WNBC

WNBC-TVW2XBSWNBT
WNBT took over Channel 4, moving from Channel 1, which the FCC was de-allocating from the VHF TV broadcast band.
It was renumbered Channel 4 in the post-war system (DuMont-owned WABD, now WNYW—had been designated as "Channel 4", before that station moved to the current channel 5 but was only required to retune its video and audio carriers downward by 2 MHz under the new system).

Wonderama

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In the early 1960s, WNEW-TV produced children's shows such as Romper Room (until 1966, when it moved to WOR-TV), The Sandy Becker Show and The Sonny Fox Show, which was later known as Wonderama.
Wonderama aired on its originating station, WNEW-TV in New York City, as well as in five other markets in which Metromedia owned television stations: WTTG in Washington D.C., KMBC-TV in Kansas City, KTTV in Los Angeles, WXIX-TV in Cincinnati, and WTCN-TV in Minneapolis – Saint Paul.

MyNetworkTV

My Network TVMNTMy
The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with Secaucus, New Jersey-licensed MyNetworkTV flagship WWOR-TV (channel 9).

One World Trade Center

North TowerFreedom Tower1 World Trade Center
The two stations share studios at the Fox Television Center on East 67th Street in Manhattan's Yorkville neighborhood; WNYW's transmitter is located atop One World Trade Center.
The center mast contained the television signals for almost all NYC television broadcasters: WCBS-TV 2, WNBC-TV 4, WNYW 5, WABC-TV 7, WWOR-TV 9 Secaucus, WPIX 11, WNET 13 Newark, WPXN-TV 31 and WNJU 47 Linden.

WPIX

WPIX-TVPIX 11WPIX 11
WABD thus became the New York market's fourth independent station, alongside WOR-TV (channel 9), WPIX (channel 11) and Newark-licensed WATV (channel 13).
From its early years through the 1960s, WPIX, like the other two major independents in New York, WOR-TV (channel 9) and WNEW-TV (channel 5), struggled to acquire other programming.

Good Day New York

Fox 5 LiveGood Day CaféGood Day Wake Up
On August 1, 1988, the station dropped its weekday morning cartoons in favor of a local news/information program titled Good Day New York, which continues to this day.
Good Day New York is a morning show airing on WNYW Fox 5 (channel 5), a Fox owned-and-operated television station in New York City, New York that is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation.

WNET

WNTA-TVWNET-TVThirteen/WNET
WABD thus became the New York market's fourth independent station, alongside WOR-TV (channel 9), WPIX (channel 11) and Newark-licensed WATV (channel 13).
The station continued to lag behind New York's other independent stations—WNEW-TV (channel 5), WOR-TV (channel 9) and WPIX (channel 11)—in terms of audience size, and NTA incurred a large debt load.

Flagship (broadcasting)

flagship stationflagshipflagship stations
WNYW, virtual channel 5 (UHF digital channel 27), is the flagship station of the Fox television network, licensed to New York, New York, United States.
Fox-owned WNYW in New York City is considered the network's overall flagship, while sister station KTTV in Los Angeles is considered a second flagship station.

A Current Affair (American TV program)

A Current AffairA Current Affair (US)A Current Affair'' (American TV program)
In late summer 1986, WNYW debuted the nightly newsmagazine A Current Affair, one of the first shows to be labeled as a "tabloid television" program.
The program was produced by 20th Century Fox, and long based at Fox's New York flagship station WNYW.

John Kluge

John W. KlugeJohn Werner KlugeMetromedia International Group Inc.
Washington-based investor John Kluge acquired Paramount Pictures' controlling interest in Metropolitan Broadcasting and appointed himself as the company's chairman.
Metropolitan Broadcasting consisted of two stations, WABD in New York City and WTTG in Washington, D.C., both former DuMont outlets now operating as independent stations.

Bob McAllister

The Bob McAllister Show
Bob McAllister took over hosting Wonderama in 1967 and by 1970 it was syndicated to the other Metromedia stations.
The Bob McAllister Show was a big success and led to an offer from WNEW-TV Channel 5 in New York to host his own program there, where it premiered on September 9, 1968.

DuMont Building

515 Madison Avenue
The station originally broadcast from the DuMont Building at 515 Madison Avenue with a transmission tower atop the building (the original tower, long abandoned by the station, still remains).
The station became commercially licensed as WABD—named for DuMont's initials—in 1944, WNEW-TV in 1958, and is now WNYW.

American Broadcasting Company

ABCABC-TVABC Network
On December 14, 2017, The Walt Disney Company, owner of ABC owned-and-operated station WABC-TV (channel 7), announced its intent to buy the assets of 21st Century Fox for $66.1 billion, pending regulatory approval; the sale did not include any broadcast assets—including the Fox network, MyNetworkTV, WNYW, WWOR or any other Fox Television Stations (since that would be illegal under FCC rules prohibiting a merger between any of the four major networks)—which were transferred to a new company called Fox Corporation, a split officially completed on March 18, 2019.
Other stations carrying the initial broadcast were WMAR-TV in Baltimore, WMAL-TV in Washington, D.C., and WABD, the DuMont station in New York City, since ABC's New York station had yet to sign on.

WFFF-TV

WFFF44.2Fox 44
The station continued to serve the Binghamton area and the New York side of the Plattsburgh–Burlington market until the late 1990s, when WICZ-TV and WFFF-TV became network affiliates.
Cable systems in northeastern New York had imported network flagship WNYW from New York City, while Canadian cable systems carried WUTV from Buffalo or WUHF from Rochester.

Yorkville, Manhattan

YorkvilleYorkville, New YorkNew York, NY
The two stations share studios at the Fox Television Center on East 67th Street in Manhattan's Yorkville neighborhood; WNYW's transmitter is located atop One World Trade Center.