WWOR-TV

WOR-TVWWORWORWWOR 9New York CityTVWOR 9WWOR-DT49Channel 9
WWOR-TV, virtual channel 9 (UHF digital channel 25), is the flagship station of the MyNetworkTV programming service, licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market.wikipedia
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MyNetworkTV

My Network TVMNTMy
WWOR-TV, virtual channel 9 (UHF digital channel 25), is the flagship station of the MyNetworkTV programming service, licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market.
As a result of several deals earlier in the decade, Fox Television Stations owned several UPN affiliates, including the network's three largest stations: WWOR-TV in Secaucus, New Jersey (part of the New York City market), KCOP-TV in Los Angeles and WPWR-TV in Chicago.

WNYW

WABDWNEW-TVWNYW-TV
The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with New York-licensed Fox flagship WNYW (channel 5).
The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with Secaucus, New Jersey-licensed MyNetworkTV flagship WWOR-TV (channel 9).

Superstation

superstationscable superstationsvia satellite
WWOR is available to Dish Network subscribers as part of the satellite provider's superstations package (available to grandfathered subscribers that purchased the À la carte tier before Dish halted sales of the package to new customers in September 2013), except in markets where the local MyNetworkTV affiliate invokes syndication exclusivity to block access to WWOR's programming within the market.
In 1962, Oneonta, New York-based Eastern Microwave Inc. (EMI) – a company that was developed after a technician employed with the parent CATV system observed the operations of Montana-based microwave-to-CATV firm Western Microwave – was founded to relay the signals of WPIX, WNEW and WOR-TV (channel 9, now MyNetworkTV owned-and-operated station WWOR-TV and licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey) to Oneonta Video and other CATV systems in surrounding areas.

Independent station (North America)

independent stationIndependentindependent stations
WOR-TV entered the New York market as the last of the city's VHF stations to sign on, and one of three independents—the others being WPIX (channel 11) and Newark, New Jersey-based WATV (channel 13).
Soon, other companies decided to copy Turner's idea and applied for satellite uplinks to distribute other stations; WGN-TV in Chicago, KTVU in Oakland-San Francisco, and WPIX and WOR-TV in New York City would begin to be distributed nationally during the late 1970s and early 1980s (in the case of KTVU, it would revert to being a regional superstation by the early part of the latter decade).

WUSA (TV)

WUSAWUSA-TVWTOP-TV
Exactly ten months earlier, Bamberger launched Washington, D.C.'s fourth television station, WOIC, also on channel 9.
Bamberger also owned WOR-AM-FM in New York City, and was working to put WOR-TV (channel 9, now WWOR-TV in Secaucus, New Jersey) on the air at the same time.

WPIX

WPIX-TVPIX 11WPIX 11
WOR-TV entered the New York market as the last of the city's VHF stations to sign on, and one of three independents—the others being WPIX (channel 11) and Newark, New Jersey-based WATV (channel 13).
From its early years through the 1960s, WPIX, like the other two major independents in New York, WOR-TV (channel 9) and WNEW-TV (channel 5), struggled to acquire other programming.

Mutual Broadcasting System

MutualMutual Radio NetworkMutual Network
The main impetus for the merger was to give General Tire a controlling share in the Mutual Radio Network, which was affiliated with and partially owned by WOR and other stations.
Mutual's original participating stations were WOR–Newark, New Jersey, just outside New York (owned by the Bamberger Broadcasting Service, a division of R.H. Macy and Company; in 1949, WOR-TV would begin broadcasting & Bamberger would be renamed General Teleradio, due to General Tire & Rubber's increased investment in the TV station ), WGN–Chicago (owned by WGN Inc., a subsidiary of the Chicago Tribune), WXYZ–Detroit (owned by Kunsky-Trendle Broadcasting), and WLW–Cincinnati (owned by the Crosley Radio Company).

One World Trade Center

North TowerFreedom Tower1 World Trade Center
The two stations share studios at the Fox Television Center on East 67th Street in Manhattan's Yorkville neighborhood; WWOR-TV's transmitter is located atop One World Trade Center.
The center mast contained the television signals for almost all NYC television broadcasters: WCBS-TV 2, WNBC-TV 4, WNYW 5, WABC-TV 7, WWOR-TV 9 Secaucus, WPIX 11, WNET 13 Newark, WPXN-TV 31 and WNJU 47 Linden.

Firing Line (TV series)

Firing LineBBC's Firing LineFiring Line'' (TV series)
The long-running public affairs show Firing Line began on WOR-TV in 1966 and ran on the station until 1971, after which its host, William F. Buckley, Jr., moved the program to public television where the program aired until it ended in 1999.
Firing Line began on April 4, 1966 as an hour-long show (including breaks) for commercial television, syndicated by WOR-TV in New York City, where it ran for 240 episodes.

WNET

WNTA-TVWNET-TVThirteen/WNET
WOR-TV entered the New York market as the last of the city's VHF stations to sign on, and one of three independents—the others being WPIX (channel 11) and Newark, New Jersey-based WATV (channel 13).
The station continued to lag behind New York's other independent stations—WNEW-TV (channel 5), WOR-TV (channel 9) and WPIX (channel 11)—in terms of audience size, and NTA incurred a large debt load.

Joe Franklin

The Joe Franklin Show[Joe] FranklinJoe Franklin Show
In 1962, nostalgia maven Joe Franklin moved his daily talk program to WOR-TV, after a 12-year run on WABC-TV.
His television series debuted in January 1951 on WJZ-TV (later WABC-TV), moving to WOR-TV (later WWOR-TV) in 1962, remaining there until 1993, one of the longest running uninterrupted careers in broadcasting history.

WEPN-FM

WOR-FMWEPNWRKS
It was owned by the Bamberger Broadcasting Service (a division of R. H. Macy and Company and named after the Bamberger's department store chain), which also operated WOR (710 AM) and WOR-FM (98.7 FM).
Macy's/Bamberger sold the WOR stations (who launched a television station in October 1949) to the General Tire and Rubber Company in 1952.

Syndication exclusivity

syndexSyndication Exclusivity Rights Ruleexclusivity
WWOR is available to Dish Network subscribers as part of the satellite provider's superstations package (available to grandfathered subscribers that purchased the À la carte tier before Dish halted sales of the package to new customers in September 2013), except in markets where the local MyNetworkTV affiliate invokes syndication exclusivity to block access to WWOR's programming within the market.
CW stations are using the law in order to block KTLA in Los Angeles, WPIX/New York City and KWGN-TV/Denver, while WWOR-TV in Secaucus, New Jersey and WSBK-TV/Boston, since 2015, are presently blocked in markets where MyNetworkTV affiliates are invoking the law.

Flagship (broadcasting)

flagship stationflagshipflagship stations
WWOR-TV, virtual channel 9 (UHF digital channel 25), is the flagship station of the MyNetworkTV programming service, licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market.

WOR (AM)

WORWOR-AMWOR 710
It was owned by the Bamberger Broadcasting Service (a division of R. H. Macy and Company and named after the Bamberger's department store chain), which also operated WOR (710 AM) and WOR-FM (98.7 FM).
The TV station later became WWOR-TV, relocated to Secaucus, New Jersey, after it and the radio stations, 710 WOR and 98.7 WOR-FM, were sold to separate companies in 1987 (due to an FCC regulation in effect then that forbade TV and radio stations with different owners from sharing the same call letters).

RKO General

RKO RadioRKORKO-General
In 1955, General Tire purchased RKO Radio Pictures, giving the company's TV stations access to RKO's film library, and in 1959, General Tire's broadcasting and film divisions were renamed as RKO General.
In 1952, General Tire purchased General Teleradio (previously the Bamberger Broadcasting Service), owner of WOR-AM-FM-TV in New York, from R.H. Macy and Company.

KCAL-TV

KHJ-TVKCALKCAL 9
Soon after the building was completed in 1952, Macy's/Bamberger's merged the WOR stations with the General Tire and Rubber Company, which already had broadcasting interests in three cities through two other subsidiaries: the regional Yankee Radio Network and WNAC AM–FM–TV in Boston; and the Don Lee Broadcasting System, which operated KHJ AM–FM–TV in Los Angeles and KFRC AM–FM in San Francisco.
On March 30, 1992, Disney agreed to sell KCAL-TV's license to Pinelands, Inc., then the parent company of channel 9's former New York City sister station, now called WWOR-TV.

Steampipe Alley

The overhaul continued in 1988 and 1989, when it added the locally produced kids' show Steampipe Alley, and more evening sitcoms, including among others, reruns of NBC's top-rated sitcom The Cosby Show, Columbia Pictures Television's Who's the Boss? and 227, as well as MCA/Universal-sourced programming including The Munsters Today, Out of This World, Superboy (TV series), My Secret Identity, Bionic Six, and The New Lassie.
Steampipe Alley is a children's television program that aired on Secaucus, New Jersey station WWOR-TV from February 7, 1988 to April 18, 1993.

City of license

licensedcommunitycommunity of license
WWOR-TV, virtual channel 9 (UHF digital channel 25), is the flagship station of the MyNetworkTV programming service, licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market.

Fox Television Stations

FoxFox Television Stations GroupFox-owned
The station is owned by the Fox Television Stations subsidiary of Fox Corporation, as part of a duopoly with New York-licensed Fox flagship WNYW (channel 5).

The Richard Bey Show

WWOR-TV also borrowed program formats used on the Westinghouse stations: a short-lived version of Evening Magazine aired in primetime, and a locally produced talk show called People Are Talking ran at 11 a.m. That show would later change its title to 9 Broadcast Plaza (named after the station's Secaucus studio location), and then to The Richard Bey Show for syndication.
The program was originally produced from and aired on WWOR-TV in Secaucus, New Jersey, from 1992 to late 1994.

Prime Time Entertainment Network

PTENWBN
In 1993, BHC aligned its independent stations with the Prime Time Entertainment Network.
At the time of PTEN's founding, co-owner Chris-Craft Industries owned independent television stations in several large and mid-sized U.S. cities (among them its two largest stations, WWOR-TV in New York City and KCOP-TV in Los Angeles) through its BHC Communications and United Television divisions, which formed the nuclei of the network.

WNAC-TV (Boston)

WNAC-TVTVWNAC
Soon after the building was completed in 1952, Macy's/Bamberger's merged the WOR stations with the General Tire and Rubber Company, which already had broadcasting interests in three cities through two other subsidiaries: the regional Yankee Radio Network and WNAC AM–FM–TV in Boston; and the Don Lee Broadcasting System, which operated KHJ AM–FM–TV in Los Angeles and KFRC AM–FM in San Francisco.
In light of RKO's dishonesty, the FCC stripped RKO of the Boston license and the licenses for KHJ-TV (now KCAL-TV) in Los Angeles and WOR-TV (now WWOR-TV).

WWOR EMI Service

superstation feedAdvance Entertainment Corporationcable feed
Eastern Microwave would eventually launch a separate feed for satellite and cable subscribers on January 1, 1990, called the "WWOR EMI Service".
WWOR EMI Service was a New York City-based American cable television channel that operated as a superstation feed of Secaucus, New Jersey-licensed WWOR-TV (channel 9).

Secaucus, New Jersey

SecaucusSecaucus, NJHarmon Cove
WWOR-TV, virtual channel 9 (UHF digital channel 25), is the flagship station of the MyNetworkTV programming service, licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, United States and serving the New York City television market.
WWOR-TV, channel 9, is a television station licensed to Secaucus, serving the New York metro area television market as the flagship station of the MyNetworkTV programming service.