WYSIWYG

What you see is what you getwhat-you-see-is-what-you-getWYSIWYG editorWYSIWIGWYSIWYLdisplays the user's changes as they are addedpreview layoutsvisual editorsWhat you see is what you get!What-You-Type-Is-What-You-Get
In computing, What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG, ) is a system where editing software allows content to be edited in a form that resembles its appearance when printed or displayed as a finished product, such as a printed document, web page, or slide presentation.wikipedia
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Desktop publishing

DTPDesktop publishing softwaredigital typography
Desktop publishing often requires the use of a personal computer and WYSIWYG page layout software to create documents for either large-scale publishing or small-scale local multifunction peripheral output and distribution — although a non-WYSIWYG system such as LaTeX could also be used for the creation of highly-structured and technically-demanding documents as well.

Page layout

layoutlayoutstemplate
WYSIWYG word processors made it possible for general office users and consumers to make more sophisticated page layouts, use text justification, and use more fonts than were possible with typewriters.

Bravo (software)

BravoBravo text editor
Bravo, a document preparation program for the Alto produced at Xerox PARC by Butler Lampson, Charles Simonyi and colleagues in 1974, is generally considered to be the first program to incorporate the WYSIWYG technology, displaying text with formatting (e.g. with justification, fonts, and proportional spacing of characters).
Bravo was the first WYSIWYG document preparation program.

Xerox Star

StarXerox 8010 ('Star') SystemXerox 8010 Star
Bravo was released commercially, and the software eventually included in the Xerox Star can be seen as a direct descendant of it.
The concept of what you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) was considered paramount.

Hewlett-Packard

HPHewlett PackardHewlett-Packard Company
In late 1978, in parallel with but independent of the work at Xerox PARC, Hewlett Packard developed and released the first commercial WYSIWYG software application for producing overhead slides (or what today are referred to as presentation graphics).
The HP 2640 series included one of the first bit mapped graphics displays that when combined with the HP 2100 21MX F-Series microcoded Scientific Instruction Set enabled the first commercial WYSIWYG Presentation Program, BRUNO that later became the program HP-Draw on the HP 3000.

Markup language

markupmarkup languagestext encoding
These applications typically used an arbitrary markup language to define the codes/tags.
Availability of WYSIWYG ("what you see is what you get") publishing software supplanted much use of these languages among casual users, though serious publishing work still uses markup to specify the non-visual structure of texts, and WYSIWYG editors now usually save documents in a markup-language-based format.

MacWrite

MacWrite IIMacWrite Pro
as improving technology allowed the production of cheaper bitmapped displays, and WYSIWYG software started to appear in more popular computers, including LisaWrite for the Apple Lisa, released in 1983, and MacWrite for the Apple Macintosh, released in 1984.
MacWrite is a WYSIWYG word processor application released along with the first Apple Macintosh systems in 1984.

WordStar

MicroProMicroPro InternationalWordStar 4.0
By 1981, MicroPro advertised that its WordStar word processor had WYSIWYG, but its display was limited to displaying styled text in WYSIWYG fashion; bold and italic text would be represented on screen, instead of being surrounded by tags or special control characters.
WordStar was the first microcomputer word processor to offer mail merge and WYSIWYG.

Text editor

text editorstext editingeditor
In this environment there was very little distinction between text editors and word processors.
Non-WYSIWYG word processors, such as WordStar, are more easily pressed into service as text editors, and in fact were commonly used as such during the 1980s.

Formatted text

rich textstyled texttext formatting
By 1981, MicroPro advertised that its WordStar word processor had WYSIWYG, but its display was limited to displaying styled text in WYSIWYG fashion; bold and italic text would be represented on screen, instead of being surrounded by tags or special control characters.
Many markup languages can also be edited with specialized software designed to automate some functions or present the output as WYSIWYG.

Charles Simonyi

Charles SimonyDr. Charles SimonyiSimonyi
Bravo, a document preparation program for the Alto produced at Xerox PARC by Butler Lampson, Charles Simonyi and colleagues in 1974, is generally considered to be the first program to incorporate the WYSIWYG technology, displaying text with formatting (e.g. with justification, fonts, and proportional spacing of characters).
He and Lampson developed Bravo, the first WYSIWYG document preparation program, which became operational in 1974.

Pixel density

ppipixels per inchHiDPI
The Alto monitor (72 PPI, based on the typographic unit) was designed so that one full page of text could be seen and then printed on the first laser printers.
High pixel density display technologies would make supersampled antialiasing obsolete, enable true WYSIWYG graphics and, potentially enable a practical “paperless office” era.

VisualEditor

In 2012, Wikipedia offered a WYSIWYG editor called VisualEditor, which allowed edits of Wikipedia to be performed without seeing the page source.
VisualEditor (VE) is a project to provide a "visual" or "WYSIWYG-like" online rich-text editor as a MediaWiki extension to Wikipedia.

Butler Lampson

Butler W. LampsonLampson
Bravo, a document preparation program for the Alto produced at Xerox PARC by Butler Lampson, Charles Simonyi and colleagues in 1974, is generally considered to be the first program to incorporate the WYSIWYG technology, displaying text with formatting (e.g. with justification, fonts, and proportional spacing of characters).
At PARC, Lampson helped work on many other revolutionary technologies, such as laser printer design; two-phase commit protocols; Bravo, the first WYSIWYG text formatting program; and Ethernet, the first high-speed local area network (LAN).

Bruno (software)

BRUNO
The first release, named BRUNO (after an HP sales training puppet), ran on the HP 1000 minicomputer, taking advantage of HP 2640—HP's first bitmapped computer terminal.
BRUNO was the first commercial computer software program for creating presentations (Presentation program) using a WYSIWYG user interface.

Geraldine Jones (character)

Geraldine JonesGeraldine
The phrase "what you see is what you get", from which the acronym derives, was a catchphrase popularized by Flip Wilson's drag persona Geraldine, first appearing in September 1969, then regularly in the early 1970s on The Flip Wilson Show.
popular culture as catchphrases, especially "When you're hot, you're hot; when you're not, you're not," "The Devil made me do it," and "What you see is what you get!"

PARC (company)

Xerox PARCPARCPalo Alto Research Center
Bravo, a document preparation program for the Alto produced at Xerox PARC by Butler Lampson, Charles Simonyi and colleagues in 1974, is generally considered to be the first program to incorporate the WYSIWYG technology, displaying text with formatting (e.g. with justification, fonts, and proportional spacing of characters).

ImageWriter

ImageWriter IIImageWriter LQApple ImageWriter
The Apple Macintosh system was originally designed so that the screen resolution and the resolution of the ImageWriter dot-matrix printers sold by Apple were easily scaled: 72 PPI for the screen and 144 DPI for the printers.
This permitted it to produce WYSIWYG output from the screen of the computer, which was an important aspect for promoting the concept of the GUI and, later, desktop publishing.

Gypsy (software)

GypsyGypsy software
It was the second WYSIWYG document preparation program, a successor to the ground-breaking Bravo on the seminal Xerox Alto personal computer.

Microsoft Word

WordMS WordWord for Windows
Advertisements depicted the Microsoft Mouse, and described Word as a WYSIWYG, windowed word processor with the ability to undo and display bold, italic, and underlined text, although it could not render fonts.

WYSIWYM

It is an adjunct to the better-known WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) paradigm, which displays the end result of a formatted document as it will appear on screen or in print — without showing the descriptive code underneath.

GNU TeXmacs

TeXmacsTeXmacs format
The program produces structured documents with a WYSIWYG user interface.

Flip Wilson

The Evil Dance of Nosliw Pilf
The phrase "what you see is what you get", from which the acronym derives, was a catchphrase popularized by Flip Wilson's drag persona Geraldine, first appearing in September 1969, then regularly in the early 1970s on The Flip Wilson Show.
Wilson's characters included Reverend Leroy, the materialistic pastor of the "Church of What’s Happening Now", and his most popular character, Geraldine Jones, who frequently referred to her unseen boyfriend, "Killer", and whose lines "The devil made me do it" as well as "What you see is what you get" became national catchphrases.

Xerox Alto

AltoAlto OSXerox Alto desktop
Bravo, a document preparation program for the Alto produced at Xerox PARC by Butler Lampson, Charles Simonyi and colleagues in 1974, is generally considered to be the first program to incorporate the WYSIWYG technology, displaying text with formatting (e.g. with justification, fonts, and proportional spacing of characters).
In December 1979, Apple Computer's co-founder Steve Jobs visited Xerox PARC, where he was shown the Smalltalk-80 object-oriented programming environment, networking, and most importantly the WYSIWYG, mouse-driven graphical user interface provided by the Alto.