Waldorf–Astoria (1893–1929)

Waldorf HotelWaldorf-Astoria HotelWaldorf-AstoriaWaldorf–AstoriaWaldorfAstoria HotelWaldorf–Astoria HotelWaldorf–Astoria Hotel Companybrownstone homeHotel Waldorf
The Waldorf–Astoria originated as two hotels, built side-by-side by feuding relatives on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.wikipedia
128 Related Articles

Waldorf Astoria New York

Waldorf-Astoria HotelWaldorf-AstoriaWaldorf Astoria
Its successor, the current Waldorf Astoria New York, was built on Park Avenue in 1931.
The original Waldorf–Astoria was built in two stages, as the Waldorf Hotel and the Astoria Hotel, which accounts for its dual name.

Empire State Building

The Empire State BuildingEmpire State350 Fifth Avenue
Built in 1893 and expanded in 1897, the Waldorf–Astoria was razed in 1929 to make way for construction of the Empire State Building.
The site of the Empire State Building, located in Midtown South on the west side of Fifth Avenue between West 33rd and 34th Streets, was originally part of an early 18th-century farm, then became the site of the Waldorf–Astoria Hotel in 1893.

Eggs Benedict

Eggs FlorentineBenedict eggsegg florentine
Tschirky authored The Cookbook by Oscar of The Waldorf (1896), a 900-page book featuring all of the recipes of the day, including his own, such as Waldorf salad, Eggs Benedict and Thousand Island dressing, which remain popular worldwide today.
In an interview recorded in the "Talk of the Town" column of The New Yorker in 1942, the year before his death, Lemuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street stock broker, said that he had wandered into the Waldorf Hotel in 1894 and, hoping to find a cure for his morning hangover, ordered "buttered toast, poached eggs, crisp bacon, and a hooker of hollandaise".

George Boldt

George C. BoldtGeorge Charles BoldtGeorge Charles Boldt Sr.
It was heavily furnished with European antiques brought back by founding proprietor George Boldt and his wife from an 1892 visit to Europe.
Boldt mediated between the feuding millionaire cousins, leasing the Astoria himself, and merging the two buildings under his management as the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

Waldorf salad

Waldorf
Tschirky authored The Cookbook by Oscar of The Waldorf (1896), a 900-page book featuring all of the recipes of the day, including his own, such as Waldorf salad, Eggs Benedict and Thousand Island dressing, which remain popular worldwide today.
Waldorf salad is named for the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York City, where it was first created for a charity ball given in honor of the St. Mary's Hospital for Children on March 14, 1896.

Hotel Astor (New York City)

Hotel AstorAstor HotelHotel Astor, Times Square
The hotel faced stiff competition from the early 20th century, with a range of new hotels springing up in New York City such the Hotel Astor (1904), perceived as a successor to the Waldorf-Astoria; The St. Regis (1904), built by John Jacob Astor IV as a companion to the Waldorf-Astoria; The Knickerbocker (1906), and the Savoy-Plaza Hotel (1927).
With its elaborately decorated public rooms and its roof garden, the Astor Hotel was perceived as the successor to the Astor family's Waldorf-Astoria on 34th Street.

Waldorf–Astoria Orchestra

Waldorf-Astoria OrchestraorchestraThe Waldorf-Astoria Orchestra
The Waldorf–Astoria Orchestra was under the direction of Joseph Knecht, who was formerly assistant concertmaster of the Metropolitan Opera House.
The Waldorf–Astoria Orchestra was an orchestra that played primarily at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, both the old and new locations.

Caspar Samler farm

Casper Samler
In 1799, John Thompson bought a 20 acre tract of land roughly bounded by Madison Avenue, 36th Street, Sixth Avenue, and 33rd Street, immediately north of the Caspar Samler farm, for (US$2400) £482 10s.
The two hotels, under one management, became known as the Waldorf-Astoria, which was razed in 1929 to make way for construction of the Empire State Building.

John Warne Gates

John W. GatesJ. W. GatesJohn Bet-a-Million Gates
One early wealthy resident was Chicago businessman J. W. Gates who would gamble on stocks on Wall Street and play poker at the hotel.
Gates maintained a suite at the Waldorf-Astoria of New York City from 1894 onwards.

Charles Yardley Turner

The panels of silk hangings were of rose pompadour, and a series of Charles Yardley Turner mural paintings filled arches and panels at the south end of the room.

Fifth Avenue

5th AvenueFifthMuseum Mile
The Waldorf–Astoria originated as two hotels, built side-by-side by feuding relatives on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
The Waldorf–Astoria originated as two hotels, built side-by-side by feuding relatives on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.

Park Avenue

Fourth AvenuePark Avenue SouthPark
Its successor, the current Waldorf Astoria New York, was built on Park Avenue in 1931.

Henry Janeway Hardenbergh

Henry HardenberghH. J. HardenberghHenry J. Hardenburgh
Constructed in the German Renaissance style by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh, it stood 225 ft high, with 15 public rooms and 450 guest rooms, and a further 100 rooms allocated to servants, with laundry facilities on the upper floors.

Delmonico's

Delmonico's RestaurantLorenzo DelmonicoCharlie Delmonico
The Empire Room was the largest and most lavishly adorned room in the Waldorf, and soon after opening, it became one of the best restaurants in New York City, rivaling Delmonico's and Sherry's.

The Sherry-Netherland

Sherry-Netherland HotelSherry Netherland HotelSherry-Netherland
The Empire Room was the largest and most lavishly adorned room in the Waldorf, and soon after opening, it became one of the best restaurants in New York City, rivaling Delmonico's and Sherry's.

French Baroque architecture

French BaroqueBaroqueFrench Baroque style
The ballroom, in the Louis XIV style, has been described as the "pièce de résistance" of the hotel, with a capacity to seat 700 at banquets and 1,200 at concerts.

Pièce de résistance

piece de resistancepìèce de résistance
The ballroom, in the Louis XIV style, has been described as the "pièce de résistance" of the hotel, with a capacity to seat 700 at banquets and 1,200 at concerts.

Maître d'hôtel

maître dmaitre dhostess
The Waldorf gained world renown for its fundraising dinners and balls, as did its celebrity maître d'hôtel, Oscar Tschirky, known as "Oscar of the Waldorf".

Oscar Tschirky

Oscar of the Waldorf
The Waldorf gained world renown for its fundraising dinners and balls, as did its celebrity maître d'hôtel, Oscar Tschirky, known as "Oscar of the Waldorf".

Thousand Island dressing

Thousand Island1000 island dressingThousand Islands
Tschirky authored The Cookbook by Oscar of The Waldorf (1896), a 900-page book featuring all of the recipes of the day, including his own, such as Waldorf salad, Eggs Benedict and Thousand Island dressing, which remain popular worldwide today.

John Jacob Astor

AstorianAstorJohann Jakob Astor
In 1826, John Jacob Astor purchased Thompson's parcel, as well as one from Mary and John Murray who owned a farm on Murray Hill, in the area which is now Madison Avenue to Lexington Avenue, between 34th and 38th streets.

Madison Avenue

MadisonMadison AveMadison Avenue (Manhattan)
In 1826, John Jacob Astor purchased Thompson's parcel, as well as one from Mary and John Murray who owned a farm on Murray Hill, in the area which is now Madison Avenue to Lexington Avenue, between 34th and 38th streets.

Lexington Avenue

Irving PlaceLexingtonLexington Avenue (Manhattan)
In 1826, John Jacob Astor purchased Thompson's parcel, as well as one from Mary and John Murray who owned a farm on Murray Hill, in the area which is now Madison Avenue to Lexington Avenue, between 34th and 38th streets.

William Backhouse Astor Sr.

William Backhouse Astor, Sr.William AstorWilliam B. Astor
In 1827, William B. Astor, Sr. bought a half interest, including Fifth Avenue from 32nd to 35th streets, for $20,500.