Wales

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿WelshWALSouth WalesWelshmanCymruNorth WalesWales, United KingdomWelsh-bornWelshmen
Wales (Cymru ) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south.
It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north.

England–Wales border

Wales-England borderWales–England borderborder
It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south.
The England–Wales border, sometimes referred to as the Wales–England border or the Anglo-Welsh border, is the border between England and Wales, two constituent countries of the United Kingdom.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Wales (Cymru ) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.
The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Welsh people

Welshits peopleWelshman
Welsh national identity emerged among the Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations. The Latinised forms of these names, Cambrian, Cambric and Cambria, survive as lesser-used alternative names for Wales, Welsh and the Welsh people.
The Welsh (Cymry) are a Celtic nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history and the Welsh language.

Irish Sea

IrishEast Irish Sea Basinsea
It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south.
The countries that are on its shoreline are, Scotland on the north, England on the east, Wales on the southeast, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on the west.

David Lloyd George

Lloyd GeorgeRt Hon David Lloyd GeorgeDavid Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor
Welsh liberalism, exemplified in the early 20th century by Lloyd George, was displaced by the growth of socialism and the Labour Party.
His father—a schoolmaster—died in 1864 and he was raised in Wales by his mother and her shoemaker brother, whose Liberal politics and Baptist faith strongly influenced Lloyd George; the same uncle helped the boy embark on a career as a solicitor after leaving school.

Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542

Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542Laws in Wales ActsLaws in Wales Act 1535
The whole of Wales was annexed by England and incorporated within the English legal system under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542.
The Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542 (Y Deddfau Cyfreithiau yng Nghymru 1535 a 1542) were parliamentary measures by which Wales became a full and equal part of the Kingdom of England and the legal system of England was extended to Wales and the norms of English administration introduced.

Politics of Wales

Welsh politicspoliticianpolitics
Distinctive Welsh politics developed in the 19th century.
Politics in Wales forms a distinctive polity in the wider politics of the United Kingdom, with Wales as one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom (UK).

Celtic nations

CelticCeltic fringeCeltic countries
Welsh national identity emerged among the Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations.
The six territories widely considered Celtic nations are Brittany (Breizh), Cornwall (Kernow), Wales (Cymru), Scotland (Alba), Ireland (Éire) and the Isle of Man (Mannin or Ellan Vannin).

Cardiff

Cardiff, WalesCaerdyddCity of Cardiff
Two-thirds of the population live in South Wales, including Cardiff, Swansea, Newport and the nearby valleys.
Cardiff (Caerdydd ) is the capital of Wales and its largest city.

South Wales

Southsouthern WalesSouth Welsh
Two-thirds of the population live in South Wales, including Cardiff, Swansea, Newport and the nearby valleys.
South Wales (De Cymru) is a loosely defined region of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south.

Llywelyn ap Gruffudd

Llewelyn the LastLlywelyn ap GruffyddLlewelyn ap Gruffydd
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century.
The son of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn Fawr and grandson of Llywelyn the Great, he was the last sovereign prince of Wales before its conquest by Edward I of England.

National Assembly for Wales

Welsh AssemblyNational Assembly of WalesNational Assembly
Established under the Government of Wales Act 1998, the National Assembly for Wales holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters.
The National Assembly for Wales (Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru; commonly known as the Welsh Assembly or Senedd) is the devolved parliament of Wales, with power to make legislation, vary taxes and scrutinise the Welsh Government.

Swansea

Swansea, WalesCity and County of SwanseaSwansea, South Wales
Two-thirds of the population live in South Wales, including Cardiff, Swansea, Newport and the nearby valleys.
Swansea (Abertawe ) is a coastal city and county, officially known as the City and County of Swansea (Dinas a Sir Abertawe) in Wales.

Newport, Wales

NewportNewport, MonmouthshireNewport, South Wales
Two-thirds of the population live in South Wales, including Cardiff, Swansea, Newport and the nearby valleys.
Newport (Casnewydd; ) is a city and unitary authority area in south east Wales, on the River Usk close to its confluence with the Severn Estuary, 12 mi northeast of Cardiff.

Mining in Wales

Metal mining in Walesmininglead mining
At the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, development of the mining and metallurgical industries transformed the country from an agricultural society into an industrial nation; the South Wales Coalfield's exploitation caused a rapid expansion of Wales' population.
Wales was famous for its coal mining, in the Rhondda Valley, the South Wales Valleys and throughout the South Wales coalfield and by 1913 Barry had become the largest coal exporting port in the world, with Cardiff as second, as coal was transported down by rail.

Tourism in Wales

tourismtourist
Now that the country's traditional extractive and heavy industries have gone or are in decline, Wales' economy depends on the public sector, light and service industries and tourism.
Wales is an emerging tourist destination, with 8,078,900 visitors to National Trust and Wales Tourist Board destinations in 2002.

Culture of Wales

Welsh cultureWelshculture
Although Wales closely shares its political and social history with the rest of Great Britain and, while a majority of the population in most areas speaks English as a first language, the country has retained a distinct cultural identity.
Wales is a country in Great Britain that has a distinctive culture, including its own language, customs, politics, holidays and music.

Welsh language

WelshWelsh-languageWelsh-speaking
Both Welsh and English are official languages; over 560,000 Welsh-speakers live in Wales, and the language is spoken by a majority of the population in parts of the north and west.
It is spoken natively in Wales, by some in England, and in Y Wladfa (the Welsh colony in Chubut Province, Argentina).

Conquest of Wales by Edward I of England

conquest of WalesConquest of Wales by Edward IEdwardian Conquest of Wales
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century.
By the 13th century Wales was divided between native Welsh principalities and the territories of the Anglo-Norman Marcher lords.

Great Britain at the Olympics

Great BritainGreat Britain and Northern IrelandTeam GB
At many international sporting events, such as the FIFA World Cup, Rugby World Cup and the Commonwealth Games, Wales has its own national teams, though at the Olympic Games, Welsh athletes compete as part of a Great Britain team.
As the National Olympic Committee (NOC) for the United Kingdom, the British Olympic Association (BOA) membership encompasses the four Home Nations of the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales), plus the three Crown dependencies (Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey), and all but three of the British overseas territories (Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands and Bermuda having their own NOCs).

Cambrian Archaeological Association

Cambrian Archæological Society
Examples include the Cambrian Mountains (which cover much of Wales and gave their name to the Cambrian geological period), the newspaper Cambrian News, and the organisations Cambrian Airways, Cambrian Railways, Cambrian Archaeological Association and the Royal Cambrian Academy of Art.
The Cambrian Archaeological Association (Cymdeithas Hynafiaethau Cymru) was founded in 1846 to examine, preserve and illustrate the ancient monuments and remains of the history, language, manners, customs, arts and industries of Wales and the Welsh Marches and to educate the public in such matters.

Welsh-language literature

Welsh literatureWelshliterature
633. In Welsh literature, the word Cymry was used throughout the Middle Ages to describe the Welsh, though the older, more generic term Brythoniaid continued to be used to describe any of the Britonnic peoples (including the Welsh) and was the more common literary term until c.
Welsh-language literature has repeatedly played a major part in the self-assertion of Wales and its people.

Cambria

CymruKambria
The Latinised forms of these names, Cambrian, Cambric and Cambria, survive as lesser-used alternative names for Wales, Welsh and the Welsh people.
Cambria is a name for Wales, being the Latinised form of the Welsh name for the country, Cymru.

Cambrian Railways

Cambrian RailwayCambrianCambrian Railways (CR)
Examples include the Cambrian Mountains (which cover much of Wales and gave their name to the Cambrian geological period), the newspaper Cambrian News, and the organisations Cambrian Airways, Cambrian Railways, Cambrian Archaeological Association and the Royal Cambrian Academy of Art.
Cambrian Railways owned 230 mi of track over a large area of mid-Wales.