Walker and Weeks

Walker & WeeksFrank WalkerHarry WeeksHenry Weeks
Walker and Weeks was an architecture firm based in Cleveland, Ohio, founded by Frank Ray Walker (September 29, 1877 - July 9, 1949) and Harry E. Weeks (October 2, 1871 - December 21, 1935).wikipedia
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J. Milton Dyer

Dyer, J. MiltonSpirit of Progress (exhibition)
At the suggestion of John M. Carrere, a member of the Cleveland Group Plan Commission, Weeks moved to Cleveland in 1905, where he went to work for the prominent Cleveland architect J. Milton Dyer (1870-1957).
He worked for Warner & Swasey (Ambrose Swasey and Worcester R. Warner's firm) for several years, and Frank Walker, Henry Weeks, and Reynold Hinsdale worked in his office.

Indiana World War Memorial Plaza

University ParkIndiana War MemorialIndiana World War Memorial
Walker and Weeks were responsible for the Indiana World War Memorial Plaza in Indianapolis, which features a cenotaph based on the Mausoleum of Maussollos.
The partnership of Walker and Weeks of Cleveland, Ohio was chosen in 1923.

Cleveland

Cleveland, OhioCleveland, OHCleveland Ohio
Walker and Weeks was an architecture firm based in Cleveland, Ohio, founded by Frank Ray Walker (September 29, 1877 - July 9, 1949) and Harry E. Weeks (October 2, 1871 - December 21, 1935).
Its downtown building, located on East 6th Street and Superior Avenue, was completed in 1923 by the Cleveland architectural firm Walker and Weeks.

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

ClevelandFederal Reserve BankFederal Reserve
Their best-known bank was the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, built in 1923.
The bank building is a 13-story 203 foot high-rise, located at Superior Avenue and East 6th Street in downtown Cleveland was designed by the Cleveland firm of Walker and Weeks and completed in 1923.

Public Auditorium

Public HallCleveland Music HallCleveland Public Hall
Designed by city architect J. Harold McDowell and Frank Walker of Walker and Weeks in a neoclassical style matching the other Group Plan buildings, it was the largest of its kind when opened, then seating 11,500.

List of architecture firms

architecture firmarchitectural firmArchitecture firms
Walker and Weeks was an architecture firm based in Cleveland, Ohio, founded by Frank Ray Walker (September 29, 1877 - July 9, 1949) and Harry E. Weeks (October 2, 1871 - December 21, 1935).

Cleveland Public Library

Cleveland Library SystemCleveland PublicCleveland Public Library – Lee–Harvard Branch
In 1915, the Cleveland architectural firm of Walker and Weeks won a competition to design a new library building.

Tate House (Tate, Georgia)

Tate House
Designed by Walker and Weeks, architects in the Neo-Classical style, the home is made of pink and white marble (Etowah Marble) supplied by Tate's Georgia Marble Company, and sometimes called the "Pink Palace or Pink Marble Mansion".

Superior Building

The architectural firm who designed the building was Walker & Weeks.

Henry Hering

Henry Hering AwardHenry Hering Medal
Walker and Weeks frequently employed sculptor Henry Hering to create sculpture for their projects.

Allen Memorial Medical Library

local medical library
Designed by the Cleveland firm of Walker and Weeks in a classical revival style, it was constructed with Indiana limestone on a pink Georgia marble base.

Cleveland Stadium

Cleveland Municipal StadiumMunicipal StadiumCleveland
Built during the administrations of city managers William R. Hopkins and Daniel E. Morgan, it was designed by the architectural firms of Walker and Weeks and by Osborn Engineering Company.

Wolfe Music Building

The three-story, neoclassical Wolfe Music Building at 2112 Euclid Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio was designed by the well-known, Cleveland-based architecture firm Walker and Weeks in 1927.

First Church of Christ, Scientist (Cleveland, Ohio)

First Church of Christ, Scientist
Built from 1929 to 1931 at a cost of $1 million, it was designed by the noted Cleveland firm of Walker and Weeks, who later designed Severance Hall, to which this building is sometimes compared.

Severance Hall

Severance
Designed by local firm Walker and Weeks, the steel framed stone-clad building is placed on the diagonal facing the intersection of Euclid Avenue and East Boulevard.

St. Paul's Episcopal Church (Cleveland Heights, Ohio)

St. Paul's Episcopal Churcha new building
The church was designed by J. Byers Hayes of Walker & Weeks in the English Gothic style.

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Pittsburgh Branch

Drury HotelFederal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Pittsburgh Branch OfficeFederal Reserve Bank Branch
The original 1931 building, designed by the noted Cleveland architecture firm Walker and Weeks, was seven stories tall, and a 10-story addition to the structure was completed in 1958 with roughly 200,000 square feet of total space.

Hope Memorial Bridge

Lorain-Carnegie BridgeGuardians of TrafficLorain–Carnegie Bridge
Pairs of statues designed by sculptor Henry Hering and architect Frank Walker – titled the "Guardians of Traffic" – stand on pylons at each end of the viaduct, symbolizing progress in transportation.

Ohio

OHState of OhioOhio, USA
Walker and Weeks was an architecture firm based in Cleveland, Ohio, founded by Frank Ray Walker (September 29, 1877 - July 9, 1949) and Harry E. Weeks (October 2, 1871 - December 21, 1935).

Beaux-Arts architecture

Beaux-ArtsBeaux ArtsBeaux-Arts style
He attended MIT where he studied architecture in the Beaux-Arts tradition, graduating in 1893.

Cenotaph

cenotaphsThe Cenotaphcentotaph
Walker and Weeks were responsible for the Indiana World War Memorial Plaza in Indianapolis, which features a cenotaph based on the Mausoleum of Maussollos.

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

Mausoleum of HalicarnassusMausoleumMausoleum of Maussollos
Walker and Weeks were responsible for the Indiana World War Memorial Plaza in Indianapolis, which features a cenotaph based on the Mausoleum of Maussollos.

Neoclassical architecture

NeoclassicalClassical Revivalneo-classical
Like many architects the firm produced work in a variety of styles, from Neoclassical, Italian Renaissance and finally, the 1930s, ending in Moderne and/or Art Deco.

Streamline Moderne

Art ModerneModerneStreamline
Like many architects the firm produced work in a variety of styles, from Neoclassical, Italian Renaissance and finally, the 1930s, ending in Moderne and/or Art Deco.