Wall of Shame

Wall of shame (epithet)
"Wall of Shame" (Schandmauer) is a phrase that is most commonly associated with the Berlin Wall.wikipedia
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Berlin Wall

fall of the Berlin WallWallthe wall
"Wall of Shame" (Schandmauer) is a phrase that is most commonly associated with the Berlin Wall. The term was used by the government of West Berlin to refer to the Berlin Wall, which surrounded West Berlin and separated it from East Berlin and the GDR.
The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the "Wall of Shame", a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt in reference to the Wall's restriction on freedom of movement.

Separation barrier

separation wallApartheid Wallbarrier
The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the "Wall of Shame"—a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt—while condemning the Wall's restriction on freedom of movement.

Willy Brandt

BrandtChancellor BrandtMayor Brandt
In this context, the phrase was coined by Willy Brandt, and it was used by the government of West Berlin, and later popularized in the English-speaking world and elsewhere from the beginning of the 1960s.

West Berlin

West-BerlinWestBerlin
In this context, the phrase was coined by Willy Brandt, and it was used by the government of West Berlin, and later popularized in the English-speaking world and elsewhere from the beginning of the 1960s. The term was used by the government of West Berlin to refer to the Berlin Wall, which surrounded West Berlin and separated it from East Berlin and the GDR.

Mexico–United States barrier

border wallwallU.S.–Mexico border wall
More recently, the term "Wall of Shame" has been used in reference to the Mexico–United States barrier, the Egypt–Gaza barrier and the Israeli West Bank barrier.

Egypt–Gaza barrier

an underground barrierEgypt – Gaza subterranean barrierEgypt-Gaza barrier
More recently, the term "Wall of Shame" has been used in reference to the Mexico–United States barrier, the Egypt–Gaza barrier and the Israeli West Bank barrier.

Israeli West Bank barrier

separation barrierWest Bank barrierSegregation Wall
More recently, the term "Wall of Shame" has been used in reference to the Mexico–United States barrier, the Egypt–Gaza barrier and the Israeli West Bank barrier.

Ruth Benedict

Patterns of CultureRuth Fulton BenedictBenedict, Ruth
The earliest use of the term, which is a translation of a Japanese phrase, may have been by Ruth Benedict, in her influential book, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword (1948), and other anthropologists discussing the honor shame culture of Japan.

The Chrysanthemum and the Sword

The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture
The earliest use of the term, which is a translation of a Japanese phrase, may have been by Ruth Benedict, in her influential book, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword (1948), and other anthropologists discussing the honor shame culture of Japan.

Guilt-Shame-Fear spectrum of cultures

Shame societyGuilt societyShame culture
The earliest use of the term, which is a translation of a Japanese phrase, may have been by Ruth Benedict, in her influential book, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword (1948), and other anthropologists discussing the honor shame culture of Japan.

East Berlin

BerlinEastEast-Berlin
The term was used by the government of West Berlin to refer to the Berlin Wall, which surrounded West Berlin and separated it from East Berlin and the GDR.

East Germany

East GermanGerman Democratic RepublicGDR
In 1961, the government of East Germany named the erected wall as the "Anti-Fascist Protection Wall", a part of the inner German border; many Berliners, however, called it "Schandmauer" ("Wall of Shame").

Inner German border

borderinner-German borderseparated
In 1961, the government of East Germany named the erected wall as the "Anti-Fascist Protection Wall", a part of the inner German border; many Berliners, however, called it "Schandmauer" ("Wall of Shame").

Time (magazine)

TimeTime MagazineTime'' magazine
Outside Germany it first appeared as "Wall of Shame" in a cover story published by TIME in 1962, and President of the United States John F. Kennedy used the term in his Annual Message to the US Congress on the State of the Union, 14 January 1963.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
Outside Germany it first appeared as "Wall of Shame" in a cover story published by TIME in 1962, and President of the United States John F. Kennedy used the term in his Annual Message to the US Congress on the State of the Union, 14 January 1963.

John F. Kennedy

KennedyPresident KennedyJohn Kennedy
Outside Germany it first appeared as "Wall of Shame" in a cover story published by TIME in 1962, and President of the United States John F. Kennedy used the term in his Annual Message to the US Congress on the State of the Union, 14 January 1963.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
Outside Germany it first appeared as "Wall of Shame" in a cover story published by TIME in 1962, and President of the United States John F. Kennedy used the term in his Annual Message to the US Congress on the State of the Union, 14 January 1963.

State of the Union

State of the Union Addressannual message to Congressannual message
Outside Germany it first appeared as "Wall of Shame" in a cover story published by TIME in 1962, and President of the United States John F. Kennedy used the term in his Annual Message to the US Congress on the State of the Union, 14 January 1963.