Walter Krivitsky

KrivitskyWalter Germanovich Krivitskiy
Walter Germanovich Krivitsky (Ва́льтер Ге́рманович Криви́цкий; June 28, 1899 – February 10, 1941) was a Soviet intelligence officer who revealed plans of signing the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact before he defected, weeks before the outbreak of World War II.wikipedia
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Ignace Reiss

Ignace PoretskyIgnatz ReissLudwik
At the time, the General Staff of the Red Army was undergoing the Great Purge in Moscow, which Krivitsky and close friend, Ignace Reiss, both abroad, found deeply disturbing.
He was a lifelong friend of Walter Krivitsky; his assassination influenced the timing and method of Whittaker Chambers' defection a few months later.

Pidvolochysk

PodwołoczyskaPodwolocyska
Walter Krivitsky was born on June 28, 1899, to Jewish parents as Samuel Ginsberg in Podwołoczyska, Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Pidvolochysk, Ukraine), he adopted the name "Krivitsky," which was based on the Slavic root for "crooked, twisted".

Noel Field

He is credited with stealing plans for submarines and planes, intercepting Nazi-Japanese correspondence, and recruiting many agents, including Magda Lupescu ("Madame Lepescu") and Noel Field.
Massing arranged for Field to make contact with Ignatz Reiss and Walter Krivitsky, who were in charge of Soviet intelligence in Switzerland.

Resident spy

rezidentresidentRezidentura
Krivitsky operated as an illegal resident spy, with false name and papers, in Germany, Poland, Austria, Italy, and Hungary.
Famous Soviet and Russian "illegals" include Richard Sorge, Walter Krivitsky, Alexander Ulanovsky, and Anna Chapman, who was also known as a sleeper agent.

Mark Zborowski

Mark Zborovski
There, he also met undercover Soviet spy Mark Zborowski, known as "Etienne," whom Sedov had sent to protect him.
Those assassinated included Ignace Reiss (1937), Andrés Nin (1937), and Walter Krivitsky (1941).

Hyères

HyeresHieresHyères les Palmiers
Sedov died mysteriously in February 1938, but Krivitsky eluded attempts to kill or kidnap him in France, including flight to Hyères.
After defecting from Soviet intelligence in 1937, Walter Krivitsky hid in Hyères (one of the farthest points in France from his operational base in Paris).

Isaac Don Levine

With the help of journalist Isaac Don Levine and literary agent Paul Wohl, Krivitsky produced an inside account of Stalin's underhanded methods.
He worked with Soviet ex-spy Walter Krivitsky in a 1939 expose of Stalin's purges and other terrorism in the Soviet Union.

Kim Philby

PhilbyAdrian PhilbyH. A. R. "Kim" Philby
It is a matter of controversy whether he gave MI5 clues to the identity of Soviet agents Donald Maclean and Kim Philby.
In 1938, Walter Krivitsky (born Samuel Ginsberg), a former GRU officer in Paris who had defected to France the previous year, travelled to the United States and published an account of his time in "Stalin's secret service".

John Herbert King

John King,
As a result of Krivitsky's debriefing, the British were able to arrest John King, a cypher clerk in the Foreign Office.
In September 1939 the Soviet defector Walter Krivitsky exposed King's name as a spy for the Soviet Union to the British Embassy in Washington.

Jane Sissmore

Jane ArcherJane Archer (security official)Kathleen Maria Margaret Archer
Krivitsky testified before the Dies Committee (later to become the House Un-American Activities Committee) in October 1939, and sailed as "Walter Thomas" to London in January 1940 to be debriefed by Jane Archer of British Military Intelligence, MI5.
Jane Archer's 1940 debriefing of Walter Krivitsky was done using the name "Mrs Moore" and it has been described by Christopher Andrew as "the first really professional debriefing of a Soviet Intelligence officer on either side of the Atlantic".

Whittaker Chambers

ChambersPumpkin PapersChambers, Whittaker
That decision caused him much mental anguish, as he impressed on American defector Whittaker Chambers, as he told Chambers, "In our time, informing is a duty" (recounted by Chambers in his autobiography, Witness).
Levine had introduced Chambers to Walter Krivitsky, who was already informing American and British authorities about Soviet agents who held posts in both governments.

List of Soviet and Eastern Bloc defectors

List of Eastern Bloc defectorsdefected while serving The OGPU in FranceList of Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc defectors

GRU (G.U.)

GRUMain Intelligence DirectorateSoviet military intelligence
The existence of the GRU was not publicized during the Soviet era, but documents concerning it became available in the West in the late 1920s, and it was mentioned in the 1931 memoirs of the first OGPU defector, Georges Agabekov, and described in detail in the 1939 autobiography (I Was Stalin's Agent) by Walter Krivitsky, the most senior Red Army intelligence officer ever to defect.

Paul Wohl

With the help of journalist Isaac Don Levine and literary agent Paul Wohl, Krivitsky produced an inside account of Stalin's underhanded methods.
Wohl met Soviet spy Walter Krivitsky in the mid-1920s.

NKVD

Soviet intelligencePeople's Commissariat for Internal AffairsSoviet secret police
It is certain, however, that the People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs, Narodnyy Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del, abbreviated NKVD, learned of his testimony and initiated operations to silence him.
Prominent political dissidents were also found dead under highly suspicious circumstances, including Walter Krivitsky, Lev Sedov, Ignace Reiss and former German Communist Party (KPD) member Willi Münzenberg.

Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact

Molotov-Ribbentrop PactNazi-Soviet PactHitler-Stalin Pact
Walter Germanovich Krivitsky (Ва́льтер Ге́рманович Криви́цкий; June 28, 1899 – February 10, 1941) was a Soviet intelligence officer who revealed plans of signing the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact before he defected, weeks before the outbreak of World War II.

Louis Waldman

Waldman
Krivitsky retained Louis Waldman to represent him on legal matters.
During this period, he represented Walter Krivitsky among others.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
Walter Germanovich Krivitsky (Ва́льтер Ге́рманович Криви́цкий; June 28, 1899 – February 10, 1941) was a Soviet intelligence officer who revealed plans of signing the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact before he defected, weeks before the outbreak of World War II.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Walter Germanovich Krivitsky (Ва́льтер Ге́рманович Криви́цкий; June 28, 1899 – February 10, 1941) was a Soviet intelligence officer who revealed plans of signing the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact before he defected, weeks before the outbreak of World War II.

Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria

GaliciaAustrian GaliciaAustrian Poland
Walter Krivitsky was born on June 28, 1899, to Jewish parents as Samuel Ginsberg in Podwołoczyska, Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Pidvolochysk, Ukraine), he adopted the name "Krivitsky," which was based on the Slavic root for "crooked, twisted".

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
Walter Krivitsky was born on June 28, 1899, to Jewish parents as Samuel Ginsberg in Podwołoczyska, Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Pidvolochysk, Ukraine), he adopted the name "Krivitsky," which was based on the Slavic root for "crooked, twisted".

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
Walter Krivitsky was born on June 28, 1899, to Jewish parents as Samuel Ginsberg in Podwołoczyska, Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Pidvolochysk, Ukraine), he adopted the name "Krivitsky," which was based on the Slavic root for "crooked, twisted".

Slavic languages

SlavicSlavonicSlavic language
Walter Krivitsky was born on June 28, 1899, to Jewish parents as Samuel Ginsberg in Podwołoczyska, Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Pidvolochysk, Ukraine), he adopted the name "Krivitsky," which was based on the Slavic root for "crooked, twisted".

Pseudonym

nom de guerrealiaspseudonyms
It was a revolutionary nom de guerre when he entered the Cheka, Bolshevik intelligence, in around 1917.