Wampanoag

Wampanoag peopleWampanoagsWampanoag TribeWampanoag NationWampanoag ConfederacyWamponoagWôpanâakMashpee TribeMassachusetts FederationPatuxet
The Wampanoag, also rendered Wôpanâak, are an American Indian tribe.wikipedia
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Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe

Mashpee WampanoagMashpee Wampanoag Tribe, MassachusettsMashpee
The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head in Massachusetts are Federally recognized, and the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, Namasket (or Nemasket) Pokanoket Band, and Pocasset Wampanoag Tribe (Pokonoket) are recognized by the State of Massachusetts.
The Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribal Council, Inc., formerly known as the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, is one of two federally recognized tribes of Wampanoag people in Massachusetts.

Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head

Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah)Aquinnah WampanoagWampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) of Massachusetts
The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head in Massachusetts are Federally recognized, and the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, Namasket (or Nemasket) Pokanoket Band, and Pocasset Wampanoag Tribe (Pokonoket) are recognized by the State of Massachusetts.
The Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) is a federally recognized tribe of Wampanoag people based in the town of Aquinnah on the southwest tip of Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts.

Rhode Island

RIState of Rhode IslandR.I.
They lived in southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island in the beginning of the 17th century, at the time of first contact with the English colonists, a territory that included the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.
Metacomet was the Wampanoag tribe's war leader, whom the colonists called King Philip.

Martha's Vineyard

Martha's Vineyard, MassachusettsMartha’s VineyardMarthas Vineyard
They lived in southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island in the beginning of the 17th century, at the time of first contact with the English colonists, a territory that included the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.
Originally inhabited by the Wampanoag people, Martha's Vineyard was known in the Massachusett language as Noepe, or "land amid the streams".

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head in Massachusetts are Federally recognized, and the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, Namasket (or Nemasket) Pokanoket Band, and Pocasset Wampanoag Tribe (Pokonoket) are recognized by the State of Massachusetts.
Alternatively, Massachusett has been represented as Moswetuset—from the name of the Moswetuset Hummock (meaning "hill shaped like an arrowhead") in Quincy, where Plymouth Colony commander Myles Standish, hired English military officer, and Squanto, part of the now disappeared Patuxet band of the Wampanoag peoples, met Chief Chickatawbut in 1621.

King Philip's War

King Phillips WarKing Philip’s WarKing Philips War
More than 50 years later, King Philip's War (1675–1676) of Indian allies against the colonists resulted in the death of 40 percent of the surviving tribe.
The war is named for Metacomet, the Wampanoag chief who adopted the name Philip because of the friendly relations between his father Massasoit and the Mayflower Pilgrims.

Massachusett language

WampanoagMassachusettWampanoag language
The last speakers of the Massachusett language Wôpanâak died more than 100 years ago, although some Wampanoag people have been working on a language revival project since 1993.
The language is also known as Natick or Wôpanâak (Wampanoag), and historically as Pokanoket, Indian or Nonantum.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
Many male Wampanoag were sold into slavery in Bermuda or the West Indies, and some women and children were enslaved by colonists in New England.
Prominent tribes included the Abenakis, Mi'kmaq, Penobscot, Pequots, Mohegans, Narragansetts, Pocumtucks, and Wampanoag.

Pokanoket

PocanetPocassetPoconaokit
In 1616, John Smith erroneously referred to the entire Wampanoag confederacy as the Pokanoket, one of the tribes.
The Pauquunaukit Wampanoag (anglicized as Pokanoket, literally, "land at the clearing" in Natick) is an indigenous group in present-day Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Bristol, Rhode Island

BristolBristol, RIBristol, R.I.
The Pokanoket tribal seat was located near Bristol, Rhode Island.
Before the Pilgrims arrived in 1620, the Wampanoags occupied much of New England, including Plymouth, Cape Cod, and Narragansett Bay.

Nantucket

Nantucket, MassachusettsNantucket IslandNantucket County
They lived in southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island in the beginning of the 17th century, at the time of first contact with the English colonists, a territory that included the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.
Nantucket probably takes its name from a Wampanoag word, transliterated variously as natocke, nantaticu, nantican, nautica or natockete, which is part of Wampanoag lore about the creation of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.

Fall River, Massachusetts

Fall RiverFall River, MAFall River Historical Society
It is one of the Pokanoket royal family clans of the Wattupa Reservation State Park in Freetown and Fall River, Massachusetts.
At the time of the establishment of the Plymouth Colony in 1620, the area that would one day become Troy City was inhabited by the Pokanoket Wampanoag tribe, headquartered at Mount Hope in what is now Bristol, Rhode Island.

Freetown, Massachusetts

FreetownFreetown,Freetown, MA
It is one of the Pokanoket royal family clans of the Wattupa Reservation State Park in Freetown and Fall River, Massachusetts.
Freetown was first settled by the English on April 2, 1659 on the banks of the Assonet River, when the areas of Assonet and Fall River were purchased for 20 coats, two rugs, two iron pots, two kettles, one little kettle, eight pairs of shoes, six pairs of stockings, one dozen hoes, one dozen hatchets, and two yards of broadcloth from the Wampanoag Indians in an exchange known as Ye Freemen's Purchase.

Patuxet

Patuxet tribePatuxet IndiansPatuxet band
A Patuxet named Tisquantum (or Squanto) was bought by Spanish monks who attempted to convert him before setting him free.
The Patuxet were a Native American band of the Wampanoag tribal confederation.

Massasoit

OusamequinChief MassasoitSachem Massasoit
They enabled the Pilgrims to survive their first winters, and Squanto lived with them and acted as a middleman between them and Massasoit, the Wampanoag sachem.
1581 – 1661) was the sachem or leader of the Wampanoag tribe.

Plymouth, Massachusetts

PlymouthPlymouth, MAPlimouth
In 1620, the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth, and Tisquantum and other Wampanoag taught them how to cultivate the varieties of corn, squash, and beans (the Three Sisters) that flourished in New England, as well as how to catch and process fish and collect seafood.
Prior to the arrival of the Pilgrims, the location of Plymouth was a village of the Wampanoag tribe called Patuxet.

Chappaquiddick Island

ChappaquiddickChappaquiddick Island, MassachusettsChappaquidick
On Martha's Vineyard in the 18th and 19th centuries, there were three reservations—Chappaquiddick, Christiantown and Gay Head.
The island was once mainly the home territory of the Chappaquiddick band of Wampanoag Indians, and remained exclusively theirs well into the nineteenth century.

Squanto

Thomas HuntTisquantumSquanto and The First Thanksgiving
A Patuxet named Tisquantum (or Squanto) was bought by Spanish monks who attempted to convert him before setting him free.
Politically it has been generally (although not universally) inferred that the Patuxet had been subjugated by the so-called Wampanoags (Pokanoket) and made part of the so-called Wampanoag confederacy.

Thanksgiving (United States)

ThanksgivingThanksgiving DayFirst Thanksgiving
Since the late 20th century, the event celebrated as the first Thanksgiving has been debated in the United States.
The Wampanoag leader Massasoit also gave food to the colonists during the first winter when supplies brought from England were insufficient.

Roger Williams

Roger Williams (theologian)founderRoger William
Roger Williams (1603–1683) stated that "single fornication they count no sin, but after Marriage… they count it heinous for either of them to be false."
He traveled 55 miles through the deep snow, from Salem to Raynham, Massachusetts where the local Wampanoags offered him shelter at their winter camp.

Warren, Rhode Island

WarrenWarren, RISowam
In 1632, the Narragansetts attacked Massasoit's village in Sowam, but the colonists helped the Wampanoag to drive them back.
In 1623, Winslow and John Hampden saved the life of Wampanoag Sachem Massasoit, gaining an important ally.

Metacomet

King PhilipMetacomKing Phillip
The older son Wamsutta was given the name Alexander, and his younger brother Metacom was named Philip.
Metacom (1638 – August 12, 1676), also known as Metacomet and by his adopted English name King Philip, was sachem (elected chief) to the Wampanoag people and the second son of the sachem Massasoit.

Cape Cod

Cape Cod, MassachusettsCape and IslandsCape
Philip called a council of war on Mount Hope; most Wampanoag wanted to follow him, with the exception of the Nauset on Cape Cod and the small groups on the offshore islands.
Cape Cod has been the home of the Wampanoag Native American people for many centuries.

Experience Mayhew

Mayhew family
Experience Mayhew said that "it seems to be a Truth with respect to our Indians, so far as my knowledge of them extend, that there have been, and are a greater number of their Women appearing pious than of the men among them" in his text "Indian Converts".
Experience Mayhew (1673-1758) was a New England missionary to the Wampanoag Indians on Martha's Vineyard and adjacent islands.

Wamsutta

The older son Wamsutta was given the name Alexander, and his younger brother Metacom was named Philip.
undefined 1634–1662), also known as Alexander Pokanoket, as he was called by New England colonists, was the eldest son of Massasoit (meaning Great Leader) Ousa Mequin of the Pokanoket Tribe and Wampanoag nation, and brother of Metacomet.