War

Mural of War (1896), by Gari Melchers
The percentages of men killed in war in eight tribal societies, and Europe and the U.S. in the 20th century. (Lawrence H. Keeley, archeologist)
The Egyptian siege of Dapur in the 13th century BC, from Ramesseum, Thebes.
Japanese samurai attacking a Mongol ship, 13th century
Finnish soldiers during the Winter War.
American tanks moving in formation during the Gulf War.
Soldiers of the Australian 4th Division equipped for chemical warfare in WWI, Ypres sector, 1917
Global deaths in conflicts since the year 1400.
The Apotheosis of War (1871) by Vasily Vereshchagin
The remains of dead Crow Indians killed and scalped by Sioux c. 1874
Les Grandes Misères de la guerre depict the destruction unleashed on civilians during the Thirty Years' War.
Ruins of Warsaw's Napoleon Square in the aftermath of World War II
The Ottoman campaign for territorial expansion in Europe in 1566
Women and priests retrieve the dead bodies of Swabian soldiers just outside the city gates of Constance after the battle of Schwaderloh. (Luzerner Schilling)
Increasing population and constant warfare among the Maya city-states over resources may have contributed to the eventual collapse of the Maya civilization by AD 900.
Kuwaiti oil wells on fire, during the Gulf War, 1 March 1991
U.S. Marine helicopter on patrol in Somalia as part of the Unified Task Force, 1992
Median age by country. War reduces life expectancy. A youth bulge is evident for Africa, and to a lesser extent in some countries in West Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central America.
U.S. soldiers directing artillery on enemy trucks in A Shau Valley, April 1968
U.S. Marines direct a concentration of fire at their opponents, Vietnam, 8 May 1968
Morning after the Battle of Waterloo, by John Heaviside Clark, 1816
In besieged Leningrad. "Hitler ordered that Moscow and Leningrad were to be razed to the ground; their inhabitants were to be annihilated or driven out by starvation. These intentions were part of the 'General Plan East'." – The Oxford Companion to World War II.
Anti-war rally in Washington, D.C., 15 March 2003

Intense armed conflict between states, governments, societies, or paramilitary groups such as mercenaries, insurgents, and militias.

- War
Mural of War (1896), by Gari Melchers

46 related topics

Alpha

The First Geneva Convention governing the sick and wounded members of armed forces was signed in 1864.

Law of war

The First Geneva Convention governing the sick and wounded members of armed forces was signed in 1864.
The signing of the First Geneva Convention by some of the major European powers in 1864.
1904 article outlining the basic principles of the law of war, as published in the Tacoma Times.
The emblem of the International Committee of the Red Cross (French: Comité international de la croix-rouge).

The law of war is the component of international law that regulates the conditions for initiating war (jus ad bellum) and the conduct of warring parties (jus in bello).

Austro-Hungarian prisoners of war in Russia during World War I, 1915.

Prisoner of war

Austro-Hungarian prisoners of war in Russia during World War I, 1915.
Engraving of Nubian prisoners, Abu Simbel, Egypt, 13th century BC.
Mongol riders with prisoners, 14th century
Aztec sacrifices, as depicted in the Codex Mendoza (c. 1541)
Russian and Japanese prisoners being interrogated by Chinese officials during the Boxer Rebellion.
Union Army soldier on his release from a Confederate POW camp around 1865.
Union prisoners of war on the way to Camp Ford prison in October 1864.
Japanese illustration depicting the beheading of Chinese captives during the Sino-Japanese War of 1894–5.
American prisoners of war in Germany in 1917.(11th Engineer Regiment)
US POWs at German prison camp Rastatt, Germany 1918.
German soldiers captured by British at Flanders.
German soldier of 120th Infantry Regiment POW 1 January 1918
A memorial to German prisoners of war who died in 1914–1920
Celebration for returning POWs, Berlin 1920
Jewish USSR POW captured by German Army, August 1941. At least 50,000 Jewish soldiers were executed after selection.
Representation of a "Forty-and-eight" boxcar used to transport American POWs in Germany during World War II.
Telegram notifying parents of an American POW of his capture by Germany
An improvised camp for Soviet POWs. Between June 1941 and January 1942, the Nazis killed an estimated 2.8 million Soviet prisoners of war, whom they viewed as "subhuman".
Naked Soviet prisoners of war in Mauthausen concentration camp.
German POW at Stalingrad
German prisoners of war being paraded through Moscow
Katyn 1943 exhumation. Photo by International Red Cross delegation.
Remagen open-field Rheinwiesenlager
US Army: Card of capture for German POWs – front
Reverse of US Army Card of capture
Certificate of Discharge
of a German General
(Front- and Backside)
A group of Japanese soldiers captured during the Battle of Okinawa.
A U.S. Army POW of the 21st Infantry Regiment bound and killed by North Koreans during the Korean War.
Waiting interrogation, 199th LT INF BG by James Pollock Vietnam War
An American POW being released by North Vietnamese and Viet Cong captors in February 1973.
Recently released American POWs from North Vietnamese prison camps in 1973.
Troops of the Suffolk Regiment surrendering to the Japanese, 1942
Many US and Filipino POWs died as a result of the Bataan Death March, in May 1942
Water colour sketch of "Dusty" Rhodes by Ashley George Old
Australian and Dutch POWs at Tarsau, Thailand in 1943
U.S. Army Nurses in Santo Tomas Internment Camp, 1943
U.S. Navy nurses rescued from Los Baños Internment Camp, March 1945
Allied prisoners of war at Aomori camp near Yokohama, Japan waving flags of the United States, Great Britain, and the Netherlands in August 1945.
Canadian POWs at the Liberation of Hong Kong
Malnourished Australian POWs forced to work at the Aso mining company, August 1945.
POW art depicting Cabanatuan prison camp, produced in 1946
Australian POW Leonard Siffleet captured at New Guinea moments before his execution with a Japanese shin gunto sword in 1943.
Captured soldiers of the British Indian Army executed by the Japanese.

A prisoner of war (POW) is a person who is held captive by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict.

Wounded civilians arrive at a hospital in Aleppo during the Syrian civil war, October 2012

Civilian

Civilians under international humanitarian law are "persons who are not members of the armed forces" and are not "combatants if they carry arms openly and respect the laws and customs of war".

Civilians under international humanitarian law are "persons who are not members of the armed forces" and are not "combatants if they carry arms openly and respect the laws and customs of war".

Wounded civilians arrive at a hospital in Aleppo during the Syrian civil war, October 2012

The term "non-combatant" now refers to people in general who are not taking part of hostilities in time of war, rather than just civilians.

Clausewitz while in Prussian service

Carl von Clausewitz

Prussian general and military theorist who stressed the "moral" (meaning, in modern terms, psychological) and political aspects of war.

Prussian general and military theorist who stressed the "moral" (meaning, in modern terms, psychological) and political aspects of war.

Clausewitz while in Prussian service
Marie von Clausewitz (née, Countess von Brühl)
Clausewitz as a young man

British military theorist B. H. Liddell Hart contends that the enthusiastic acceptance by the Prussian military establishment—especially Moltke the Elder, a former student of his —of what they believed to be Clausewitz's ideas, and the subsequent widespread adoption of the Prussian military system worldwide, had a deleterious effect on military theory and practice, due to their egregious misinterpretation of his ideas:

Mural of War (1896), by Gari Melchers

Conventional warfare

Mural of War (1896), by Gari Melchers

Conventional warfare is a form of warfare conducted by using conventional weapons and battlefield tactics between two or more states in open confrontation.

The USCGC Eagle was built in 1936 as Horst Wessel for the German Navy. It was taken by the United States as reparations in 1946.

War reparations

The USCGC Eagle was built in 1936 as Horst Wessel for the German Navy. It was taken by the United States as reparations in 1946.

War reparations are compensation payments made after a war by one side to the other.

A woman, a man and a child, all three dead from starvation due to the Russian famine of 1921–1922

Famine

A woman, a man and a child, all three dead from starvation due to the Russian famine of 1921–1922
Skibbereen, Ireland during the Great Famine, 1847 illustration by James Mahony for the Illustrated London News
People waiting for famine relief in Bangalore, India (from the Illustrated London News, 1877)
294x294px
WFP's HungerMap LIVE monitors food security and predicts the status of crisis-hit areas where data is limited, World Food Programme, 2021
A 1906 Punch cartoon depicting King Leopold II as a snake entangling a Congolese man
Malnourished children in Niger, during the 2005 famine
A girl during the Nigerian Civil War of the late 1960s. Pictures of the famine caused by Nigerian blockade garnered sympathy for the Biafrans worldwide.
Laure Souley holds her three-year-old daughter and an infant son at a MSF aide center during the 2005 famine, Maradi Niger
Famine-affected areas in the western Sahel belt during the 2012 drought.
Chinese officials engaged in famine relief, 19th-century engraving
Skulls of Khmer Rouge murder victims at Choeung Ek
Victims of the Great Famine of 1876–78 in India during British rule, pictured in 1877.
A starving woman and child during the Assyrian genocide. Ottoman Empire, 1915
An engraving from Goya's Disasters of War, showing starving women, doubtless inspired by the terrible famine that struck Madrid in 1811–1812.
Illustration of starvation in northern Sweden, Swedish famine of 1867–1869
Depiction of victims of the Great Famine in Ireland, 1845–1849
Victims of the Russian famine of 1921–22 during the Russian Civil War
Malnourished child during Brazil's 1877–78 Grande Seca (Great Drought).
Lake Chad in a 2001 satellite image, with the actual lake in blue. The lake has shrunk by 95% since the 1960s.
A victim of starvation in besieged Leningrad suffering from dystrophia in 1941.
A child suffering extreme starvation in India, 1972
The government's forced collectivization of agriculture was one of the main causes of the Soviet famine of 1932–1933.
Famines since 1850 by political regime
A starving child during the 1869 famine in Algeria.
Norman Borlaug, father of the Green Revolution, is often credited with saving over a billion people worldwide from starvation.
A Somali boy receiving treatment for malnutrition at a health facility in Hilaweyn during the drought of 2011.
Freshly-dug graves for child victims of the 2011 East Africa drought, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya

A famine is a widespread scarcity of food, caused by several factors including war, natural disasters, crop failure, population imbalance, widespread poverty, an economic catastrophe or government policies.

NATO military ceremony, Pabrade, Lithuania in November 2014

Military

NATO military ceremony, Pabrade, Lithuania in November 2014
Countries by number of active soldiers (2009)
Depiction of ancient Egyptian military formation
An Ancient Greek warrior demonstrates the effectiveness of contemporary physical training regimes. Riace Bronzes, c.450 BC
An example of military command; a map of the United States' Unified Combatant Command's area of responsibility.
Finnish and American soldiers train together in arctic conditions in Lapland, Finland, as part of Cold Weather Basic Operation Course, January 6–16, 2015
Guerrilla structure
Map of military expenditures as a percentage of GDP by country, 2017.
A pie chart showing global military expenditures by country for 2019, in US$ billions, according to SIPRI
Military expenditure of 2014 in USD
The Kawasaki C-1 is a tactical military transport of the Japan Air Self-Defense Force
Red Ball Express convoy in France
The Maratha Navy, which is considered to be the foundation of the modern Indian Navy, often employed land and sea coordination tactics when attacking, which won them many battles against the Mughals and Portuguese
Dutch civilians celebrating the arrival of the I Canadian Corps in Utrecht as the Canadian Army liberates the Netherlands from Nazi occupation
Battle formation and tactics of Macedon
Arrow-head. Bronze, 4th century BC. From Olynthus, Chalcidice.
Mounted armoured knight. Armour and cavalry dominated the battlefield, until the invention of firearms.
Naval military forces of France and Britain exchange fire at the Battle of the Chesapeake
AIM-7 Sparrow medium range air-to-air missile from an F-15 Eagle
Samurai, member of the Japanese warrior caste
Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus leading a cavalry charge, 1634
Mounted and foot armoured knights. Armour and cavalry dominated the battlefield, until the invention of firearms.

A military, also known collectively as armed forces, is a heavily armed, highly organized force primarily intended for warfare.

Sewage-treatment-facility - The German language has many compounds

Non-combatant

Sewage-treatment-facility - The German language has many compounds

Non-combatant is a term of art in the law of war and international humanitarian law to refer to civilians who are not taking a direct part in hostilities; persons, such as combat medics and military chaplains, who are members of the belligerent armed forces but are protected because of their specific duties (as currently described in Protocol I of the Geneva Conventions, adopted in June 1977); combatants who are placed hors de combat; and neutral persons, such as peacekeepers, who are not involved in fighting for one of the belligerents involved in a war.

The Hittite version of the Treaty of Kadesh, among the earliest extant examples of an international agreement.

International law

Set of rules, norms, and standards generally recognized as binding between nations.

Set of rules, norms, and standards generally recognized as binding between nations.

The Hittite version of the Treaty of Kadesh, among the earliest extant examples of an international agreement.
Hugo Grotius' De jure belli ac pacis, is considered one of the foundational texts of international law. (Pictured is the title page from the second edition of 1631).
A portrait of the Dutch jurist Hugo Grotius (alias Hugo de Groot)
Sir Alberico Gentili is regarded as the Father of international law.
The First Geneva Convention (1864) is one of the earliest formulations of international law

The Dutch jurist Hugo Grotius (1583–1645) is widely regarded as the most seminal figure in international law, being one of the first scholars to articulate an international order that consists of a "society of states" governed not by force or warfare but by actual laws, mutual agreements, and customs.