War of the League of Cognac

Treaty of CambraiLeague of CognacPeace of BarcelonaCambraiPeace of CambraiTreaty of CambrayTreaty of WestminsterTreaty of Westminster (1527)EnglandFranco-Spanish War
The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence.wikipedia
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Republic of Florence

FlorenceFlorentineFlorentine Republic
The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence. A Florentine army under Francesco Ferruccio engaged the armies of the Emperor at the Battle of Gavinana in 1530, and, although the Prince of Orange himself was killed, the Imperial army won a decisive victory and the Republic of Florence surrendered ten days later. The Republic of Florence alone continued to resist the Imperial forces, which were led by the Prince of Orange.
Florence repudiated Medici authority for a second time in 1527, during the War of the League of Cognac.

Habsburg Spain

SpainSpanishSpanish Habsburgs
The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence.
Pope Clement VII switched sides and now joined forces with France and prominent Italian states against the Habsburg Emperor, in the War of the League of Cognac.

Italian War of 1521–1526

Italian War of 1521–26Treaty of MadridItalian War of 1521
Shocked by the defeat of the French in the Italian War of 1521, Pope Clement VII, together with the Republic of Venice, began to organize an alliance to drive Charles V from Italy. Francis, having signed the Treaty of Madrid, was released from his captivity in Madrid and returned to France, where he quickly announced his intention to assist Clement.
Only a few weeks after his release, however, he repudiated the terms of the treaty, starting the War of the League of Cognac.

Sack of Rome (1527)

Sack of RomeSack of Rome in 1527sacked Rome
Francesco Guicciardini, now in command of the Papal armies, proved unable to resist them; and when the Duke of Bourbon was killed, the underpaid armies sacked the city, forcing the Pope to take refuge at Castel Sant'Angelo.
The sack debilitated the League of Cognac - an alliance formed by France, Milan, Venice, Florence and the Papacy against Charles V. Pope Clement VII took refuge in Castel Sant' Angelo, where he remained until a ransom was paid to the pillagers.

Francis I of France

Francis IFrançois IKing Francis I
Francis, having signed the Treaty of Madrid, was released from his captivity in Madrid and returned to France, where he quickly announced his intention to assist Clement.
The repudiation of the Treaty of Madrid led to the War of the League of Cognac of 1526–30.

Siege of Naples (1528)

Siege of Naplesblockadedexpedition to capture Naples
Francis, having finally drawn Henry VIII into the League, sent an army under Odet de Foix and Pedro Navarro, Count of Oliveto through Genoa—where Andrea Doria had quickly joined the French and seized much of the Genoese fleet—to Naples, where it proceeded to dig itself in for an extended siege.
The Siege of Naples was a siege of the Italian city of Naples in 1528 during the War of the League of Cognac.

Pope Clement VII

Clement VIIGiulio de' MediciGiulio di Giuliano de' Medici
The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence. Shocked by the defeat of the French in the Italian War of 1521, Pope Clement VII, together with the Republic of Venice, began to organize an alliance to drive Charles V from Italy.
But deeply concerned about Imperial arrogance, he was to pick up with France again when Francis I was freed after the Treaty of Madrid (1526): the Pope entered into the League of Cognac together with France, Venice, and Francesco II Sforza of Milan.

Battle of Landriano

Landriano
Andrea Doria's offensive in Genoa (where he soon broke the blockade of the city and forced the surrender of the French at Savona), together with the decisive defeat of a French relief force under Francis de Bourbon, Comte de St. Pol at the Battle of Landriano, ended Francis's hopes of regaining his hold on Italy.
The Battle of Landriano took place on 21 June 1529, between the French army under Francis de Bourbon, Comte de St. Pol and the Imperial–Spanish army commanded by Don Antonio de Leyva, Duke of Terranova in the context of the War of the League of Cognac.

Duchy of Milan

MilanMilaneseDuke of Milan
The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence.
Following the French defeat at Pavia in 1525, which left the Spanish imperial forces of Charles V dominant in Italy, Francesco joined the League of Cognac against the emperor along with Venice, Florence, the Pope, and the French.

Francesco Guicciardini

Guicciardini, FrancescoGuicciardiniFrancesco
Francesco Guicciardini, now in command of the Papal armies, proved unable to resist them; and when the Duke of Bourbon was killed, the underpaid armies sacked the city, forcing the Pope to take refuge at Castel Sant'Angelo.
Guicciardini advised an alliance with France and urged Clement to conclude the League of Cognac in 1526, which led to war with Charles V. Later that year, as the forces of Charles V threatened to attack, Clement made Guicciardini lieutenant-general of the papal army.

Battle of Gavinana

Gavinanaeponymous battle
A Florentine army under Francesco Ferruccio engaged the armies of the Emperor at the Battle of Gavinana in 1530, and, although the Prince of Orange himself was killed, the Imperial army won a decisive victory and the Republic of Florence surrendered ten days later.
The Battle of Gavinana was a battle in the War of the League of Cognac.

Cambrai

CambrayKamerijkCambrai, France
The negotiations began in July 1529 in the border city of Cambrai; they were conducted primarily between Francis's mother Louise of Savoy for the French and her sister-in-law Margaret of Austria for her nephew the Emperor (leading to its being known as the Paix des Dames, Peace of the Ladies), Charles himself having sailed from Barcelona to Italy shortly before.
Cambrai was also the site of negotiations in 1529, concluding in the, which led to France's withdrawal from the War of the League of Cognac.

Siege of Florence (1529–30)

Siege of FlorenceSiege of Florence (1529–1530)siege
The Siege of Florence took place from 24 October 1529 to 10 August 1530, at the end of the War of the League of Cognac.

Margaret of Austria, Duchess of Savoy

Margaret of AustriaArchduchess Margaret of AustriaMargaret
The negotiations began in July 1529 in the border city of Cambrai; they were conducted primarily between Francis's mother Louise of Savoy for the French and her sister-in-law Margaret of Austria for her nephew the Emperor (leading to its being known as the Paix des Dames, Peace of the Ladies), Charles himself having sailed from Barcelona to Italy shortly before.
In 1529, together with Louise of Savoy, she negotiated the Treaty of Cambrai, the so-called Ladies' Peace.

Francesco Ferruccio

Francesco FerrucciFerrucciFerruccio
A Florentine army under Francesco Ferruccio engaged the armies of the Emperor at the Battle of Gavinana in 1530, and, although the Prince of Orange himself was killed, the Imperial army won a decisive victory and the Republic of Florence surrendered ten days later.
When Pope Clement VII and the emperor Charles V decided to reinstate the Medici in Florence, during the War of the League of Cognac, they attacked the Florentine republic, and Ferruccio was appointed Florentine military commissioner, where he showed great daring and resource by his rapid marches and sudden attacks on the Imperials.

Francis de Bourbon, Count of St. Pol

Francis de Bourbon, Comte de St. PolFrancis de BourbonComte de St-Pol
Andrea Doria's offensive in Genoa (where he soon broke the blockade of the city and forced the surrender of the French at Savona), together with the decisive defeat of a French relief force under Francis de Bourbon, Comte de St. Pol at the Battle of Landriano, ended Francis's hopes of regaining his hold on Italy.
His army was destroyed and he was taken prisoner in the Battle of Landriano, until the Treaty of Cambrai in 1529.

Philibert of Chalon

Philibert of ChâlonPhilibert of Châlon, Prince of OrangePhilibert
The Republic of Florence alone continued to resist the Imperial forces, which were led by the Prince of Orange.
Born at Nozeroy to John IV of Chalon-Arlay, Philibert served Emperor Charles V as commander in Italy, fighting in the War of the League of Cognac.

Louise of Savoy

Louise de SavoieLouise
The negotiations began in July 1529 in the border city of Cambrai; they were conducted primarily between Francis's mother Louise of Savoy for the French and her sister-in-law Margaret of Austria for her nephew the Emperor (leading to its being known as the Paix des Dames, Peace of the Ladies), Charles himself having sailed from Barcelona to Italy shortly before.
She was the principal negotiator for the Treaty of Cambrai between France and the Holy Roman Empire, concluded on 3 August 1529.

Henry V, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Henry VHenry the YoungerHenry II
Henry remained loyal to the Imperial authority during the German Peasants' War, and in 1528 he assisted Emperor Charles V in the War of the League of Cognac against King Francis I of France in Italy.

Italian Wars

Great Italian WarsItalian campaignsHabsburg-Valois War
In 1526, Pope Clement VII, alarmed at the growing power of the Empire, formed the League of Cognac against Charles V on May 22, 1526.

Antonio de Leyva, Duke of Terranova

Antonio de LeyvaAntonio de Leyva, Prince of Ascoli
After the death of Fernando d'Ávalos, Marquis of Pescara, he held further commands in Italy during the War of the League of Cognac and afterwards, finally dying shortly after attempting an invasion of Provence.

Giovanni dalle Bande Nere

Giovanni de' MediciGiovanni delle Bande Nereeponymous
In 1526, the War of the League of Cognac broke out.

Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles VEmperor Charles VCharles I of Spain
The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence.
France then joined the League of Cognac that Pope Clement VII had formed with Henry VIII of England, the Venetians, the Florentines, and the Milanese to resist imperial domination of Italy.

Malatesta IV Baglioni

Malatesta BaglioniMalatesta II BaglioniMalatesta IV
During the War of the League of Cognac, Malatesta left Perugia to Philibert of Orange, chief of the Imperial army in Italy, to assume the defence of the Republic of Florence.

House of Habsburg

HabsburgHabsburgsHabsburg dynasty
The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence.