Taft in 1909
Portrait by Harris & Ewing, c. 1920
Yale College photograph of Taft
Harding's home in Marion, Ohio
Sultan Jamalul Kiram II with William Howard Taft of the Philippine Commission in Jolo, Sulu (March 27, 1901)
Senator Joseph B. Foraker in 1908, his final full year as senator before his re-election defeat
Roosevelt introduces Taft as his crown prince: Puck magazine cover cartoon, 1906.
Harding c. 1919
One of a series of candid photographs known as the Evolution of a Smile, taken just after a formal portrait session, as Taft learns by telephone from Roosevelt of his nomination for president.
Harding begins his front porch campaign by accepting the Republican nomination, July 22, 1920.
1908 Taft/Sherman poster
"How Does He Do It?" In this Clifford Berryman cartoon, Harding and Cox ponder another big story of 1920: Babe Ruth's record-setting home run pace.
1908 electoral vote results
Harding campaigning in 1920
1909 inauguration
Harding takes the oath of office
Newton McConnell cartoon showing Canadian suspicions that Taft and others were only interested in Canada when prosperous.
Taft and Porfirio Díaz, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, 1909
Charles Evans Hughes, former Supreme Court justice and Harding's Secretary of State
Official White House portrait of Taft by Anders Zorn, c. 1911
Charles Dawes—the first budget director and later, vice president under Coolidge
Taft promoted Associate Justice Edward Douglass White to be Chief Justice of the United States.
Secretary of the Treasury Andrew W. Mellon advocated lower tax rates.
1909 Puck magazine cover: Roosevelt departs, entrusting his policies to Taft
Harding's official White House portrait, c. 1922 by Edmund Hodgson Smart
Taft with Archibald Butt (second from right)
Harding addresses the segregated crowd in Birmingham, Alabama, October 26, 1921
Taft and Roosevelt – political enemies in 1912
Harding (center) with Chief Justice Taft (left) and Robert Lincoln at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial, May 30, 1922
Campaign advertisement arguing Taft deserved a second term
Harding aboard the presidential train in Alaska, July 1923, with secretaries Hoover, Wallace, Work, and Mrs. Harding
Electoral vote by state, 1912. States won by Taft are in red.
Harding's funeral procession passing the White House
Taft (left) with President Warren G. Harding and Robert Lincoln at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial, May 30, 1922
The Harding Tomb in Marion
Chief Justice Taft, c. 1921
Harding made his friend Frank E. Scobey Director of the Mint. Medal by Chief Engraver George T. Morgan.
The U.S. Supreme Court in 1925. Taft is seated in the bottom row, middle.
Albert B. Fall, Harding's first Secretary of the Interior, became the first former cabinet member to be sent to prison for crimes committed in office.
Time cover, June 30, 1924
Harry M. Daugherty was implicated in the scandals but was never convicted of any offense.
Taft insisted that Charles Evans Hughes succeed him as chief justice.
Charles R. Forbes, director of the Veterans' Bureau, who was sent to prison for defrauding the government
Taft's headstone at Arlington National Cemetery
Charles E. Sawyer
Four-cent stamp issued for Taft (1930)
Harding memorial issue, issued September 1, 1923
Warren and Florence Harding, c.1922. Florence Harding was highly protective of her husband's legacy.

In 1921, President Warren G. Harding appointed Taft to be chief justice, a position he held until a month before his death.

- William Howard Taft

Though Foraker had little chance of winning, he sought the Republican presidential nomination against his fellow Cincinnatian, Secretary of War William Howard Taft, who was Roosevelt's chosen successor.

- Warren G. Harding
Taft in 1909

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Portrait by Harris & Ewing, 1919

Woodrow Wilson

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American politician and academic who served as the 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

American politician and academic who served as the 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

Portrait by Harris & Ewing, 1919
Wilson, c. undefined mid-1870s
Ellen Wilson in 1912
Wilson in 1902
Prospect House, Wilson's home on Princeton's campus
Governor Wilson, 1911
Results of the 1910 gubernatorial election in New Jersey. Wilson won the counties in blue.
1912 electoral vote map
Woodrow Wilson and his cabinet (1918)
Wilson giving his first State of the Union address, the first such address since 1801
Map of Federal Reserve Districts–black circles, Federal Reserve Banks–black squares, District branches–red circles and Washington HQ–star/black circle
In a 1913 cartoon, Wilson primes the economic pump with tariff, currency and antitrust laws
Official presidential portrait of Woodrow Wilson (1913)
Uncle Sam entering Mexico in 1916 to punish Pancho Villa. Uncle Sam says "I've had about enough of this."
Wilson and "Jingo", the American War Dog. The editorial cartoon ridicules jingoes baying for war.
The Wilson family
Wilson accepts the Democratic Party nomination, 1916
1916 electoral vote map
Map of the great powers and their empires in 1914
Liberty Loan drive in front of City Hall, New Orleans. On City Hall is a banner reading "Food will win the war—don't waste it".
Women workers in ordnance shops, Pennsylvania, 1918
The "Big Four" at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, following the end of World War I. Wilson is standing next to Georges Clemenceau at right.
Several new European states were established at the Paris Peace Conference
Wilson returning from the Versailles Peace Conference, 1919.
June 3, 1919, Newspapers of the 1919 bombings
Republican nominee Warren G. Harding defeated Democratic nominee James Cox in the 1920 election
The final resting place of Woodrow Wilson at the Washington National Cathedral
Quotation from Woodrow Wilson's History of the American People as reproduced in the film The Birth of a Nation.
World War I draft card, the lower left corner to be removed by men of African background to help keep the military segregated
Political cartoon published in New York Evening Mail about the East St. Louis riots of 1917. Original caption reads "Mr. President, why not make America safe for democracy?"
1934 $100,000 gold certificate depicting Wilson.
Stamps memorializing Wilson
Woodrow Wilson Monument in Prague

Wilson defeated incumbent Republican William Howard Taft and third-party nominee Theodore Roosevelt to easily win the 1912 United States presidential election, becoming the first Southerner to do so since 1848.

The Republicans centered their campaign around opposition to Wilson's policies, with Senator Warren G. Harding promising a "return to normalcy."

Coolidge in 1919

Calvin Coolidge

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The 30th president of the United States from 1923 to 1929.

The 30th president of the United States from 1923 to 1929.

Coolidge in 1919
Professor Charles Edward Garman
Grace Coolidge
Coolidge as a State Representative in 1908
Coolidge's home (1906−1930) in Northampton, Massachusetts
Coolidge with his family
Coolidge inspects militia in Boston police strike
An original Harding-Coolidge campaign button
President Harding and Vice President Coolidge with their wives
President Coolidge signing appropriation bills for the Veterans Bureau on the South Lawn during the garden party for wounded veterans, June 5, 1924. General John J. Pershing is at left. The man at right, looking on, appears to be Veterans Bureau Director Frank T. Hines.
1924 electoral vote results
Coolidge with his vice president, Charles G. Dawes
Osage men with Coolidge after he signed the bill granting Native Americans U.S. citizenship
Official portrait of Calvin Coolidge
Coolidge's cabinet in 1924, outside the White House.
Front row, left to right: Harry Stewart New, John W. Weeks, Charles Evans Hughes, Coolidge, Andrew Mellon, Harlan F. Stone, Curtis D. Wilbur.
Back row, left to right: James J. Davis, Henry C. Wallace, Herbert Hoover, Hubert Work.
Coolidge appointed Harlan F. Stone first as Attorney General and then as a Supreme Court Justice.
Coolidge addressing a crowd at Arlington National Cemetery's Roman-style Memorial Amphitheater in 1924
Coolidge with reporters and cameramen
The Coolidge Homestead in Plymouth Notch, Vermont
upright=0.7|Coolidge as an Amherst College undergraduate
Coolidge was the only president to have his portrait on a coin during his lifetime: the Sesquicentennial of American Independence Half Dollar, minted in 1926.
Coolidge on a 1938 postage stamp

The next year, he was elected the 29th vice president of the United States, and he succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923.

A major issue affecting Massachusetts Republicans that year was the party split between the progressive wing, which favored Theodore Roosevelt, and the conservative wing, which favored William Howard Taft.

Official campaign portrait, 1944

Franklin D. Roosevelt

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American politician and attorney who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

American politician and attorney who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945.

Official campaign portrait, 1944
Eleanor and Franklin with their first two children, 1908
Roosevelt in 1944
Roosevelt supported Governor Woodrow Wilson in the 1912 presidential election.
Theodore Roosevelt was Franklin Roosevelt's distant cousin and an important influence on his career.
Roosevelt as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913
Cox and Roosevelt in Ohio, 1920
Rare photograph of Roosevelt in a wheelchair, with Fala and Ruthie Bie, the daughter of caretakers at his Hyde Park estate. Photo taken by his cousin Margaret Suckley (February 1941).
Gov. Roosevelt with his predecessor Al Smith, 1930
Results of the 1930 gubernatorial election in New York
Roosevelt in the early 1930s
1932 electoral vote results
Roosevelt signs the Social Security Act into law, August 14, 1935
1936 re-election handbill for Roosevelt promoting his economic policy
1936 electoral vote results
Roosevelt with Brazilian President Getúlio Vargas and other dignitaries in Brazil, 1936
The Roosevelts with King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, sailing from Washington, D.C., to Mount Vernon, Virginia, on the USS Potomac during the first U.S. visit of a reigning British monarch (June 9, 1939)
Foreign trips of Roosevelt during his presidency
1940 electoral vote results
Roosevelt and Winston Churchill aboard HMS Prince of Wales for 1941 Atlantic Charter meeting
Territory controlled by the Allies (blue and red) and the Axis Powers (black) in June 1942
The Allies (blue and red) and the Axis Powers (black) in December 1944
1944 electoral vote results
Official portrait of President Roosevelt by Frank O. Salisbury, c. 1947
200x200px

Roosevelt was James M. Cox's running mate on the Democratic Party's 1920 national ticket, but Cox was defeated by Republican Warren G. Harding.

The election became a three-way contest when Theodore Roosevelt left the Republican Party to launch a third party campaign against Wilson and sitting Republican President William Howard Taft.

Hughes in 1931

Charles Evans Hughes

4 links

American statesman, politician and jurist who served as the 11th Chief Justice of the United States from 1930 to 1941.

American statesman, politician and jurist who served as the 11th Chief Justice of the United States from 1930 to 1941.

Hughes in 1931
Hughes at the age of 16
Hughes with his wife and children, c. 1916
Gubernatorial portrait of Charles Evans Hughes
Hughes struck up a close friendship with Associate Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
Hughes in Winona, Minnesota, during the 1916 presidential campaign campaigning on the Olympian
1916 electoral vote results
Hughes's residence in 1921
Hughes (fourth from right) leads a delegation to Brazil with Carl Theodore Vogelgesang in 1922
Time cover, December 29, 1924
Mrs. Antoinette Carter, (Mr. Hughes's Wife)
Portrait of Hughes as Chief Justice
The Hughes Court in 1937, photographed by Erich Salomon
Associate Justice William O. Douglas served alongside Hughes on the Supreme Court
Hughes's gravesite

In 1910, President William Howard Taft appointed Hughes as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

After Warren G. Harding won the 1920 presidential election, Hughes accepted Harding's invitation to serve as Secretary of State.

William Jennings Bryan

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American lawyer, orator and politician.

American lawyer, orator and politician.

Bryan's birthplace in Salem, Illinois
Attorney Mary Baird Bryan, the wife of William Jennings Bryan
A young Bryan
"UNITED SNAKES OF AMERICA" "IN BRYAN WE TRUST" political satire token of 1896, known as "Bryan Money"
Bryan campaigning for president, October 1896
1896 electoral vote results
The United States and its colonial possessions after the Spanish–American War
Conservatives in 1900 ridiculed Bryan's eclectic platform.
1900 electoral vote results
William J Bryan in 1906 as Moses with new 10 commandments; Puck 19 sept 1906 by Joseph Keppler. Tablet reads: l-Thou shalt have no other leaders before me. II—Thou shalt not make unto thyself any high Protective Tariff. Ill—Eight hours, and no more, shalt thou labor and do all thy work. IV—Thou shalt not graft. V—Thou shalt not elect thy Senators save by Popular Vote. VI—Thou shalt not grant rebates unto thy neighbor. VII—Thou shalt not make combinations in restraint of trade. VIII—Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's income, but shall make him pay a tax upon it. IX—There shall be no more government by injunction. X—Remember Election Day to vote it early. P.S.— When in doubt, ask Me.
Bryan speaking at the 1908 Democratic National Convention
Presidential Campaign button for Bryan
1908 electoral vote results
Bryan attending the 1912 Democratic National Convention
Bryan served as Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson
Cartoon of Secretary of State Bryan reading war news in 1914
Villa Serena, Bryan's home built in 1913 at Miami, Florida
Charles W. and William J. Bryan
At the Scopes Trial, William Jennings Bryan (seated, left) being questioned by Clarence Darrow (standing, right).
Statue of Bryan on the lawn of the Rhea County courthouse in Dayton, Tennessee

Bryan won his party's nomination in the 1908 presidential election, but he was defeated by Roosevelt's chosen successor, William Howard Taft.

For some of these years, he served concurrently with Warren G. Harding and Theodore Roosevelt.

In the 1920s, sculptor Gutzon Borglum and President Calvin Coolidge selected George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln (L to R) to appear on Mount Rushmore—it later became an iconic symbol of presidential greatness, chosen to represent the nation's birth, growth, development and preservation, respectively.

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

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In political studies, surveys have been conducted in order to construct historical rankings of the success of the presidents of the United States.

In political studies, surveys have been conducted in order to construct historical rankings of the success of the presidents of the United States.

In the 1920s, sculptor Gutzon Borglum and President Calvin Coolidge selected George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln (L to R) to appear on Mount Rushmore—it later became an iconic symbol of presidential greatness, chosen to represent the nation's birth, growth, development and preservation, respectively.

The 1994 survey placed only two presidents, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln, above 80 points and two presidents, Andrew Johnson and Warren G. Harding, below 50 points.

19) William Howard Taft (39%)

President of the United States

2 links

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

George Washington, the first president of the United States
President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivers a radio address, 1933
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King Jr. and others look on
President Donald Trump delivers his 2018 State of the Union Address, with Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Gorbachev sign the 1990 Chemical Weapons Accord in the White House.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, successfully preserved the Union during the American Civil War.
President Barack Obama with his Supreme Court appointee Justice Sotomayor, 2009
President Ronald Reagan reviews honor guards during a state visit to China, 1984
President Woodrow Wilson throws out the ceremonial first ball on Opening Day, 1916
President Jimmy Carter (left) debates Republican nominee Ronald Reagan on October 28, 1980.
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the congressional district method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a record four presidential elections (1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944), leading to the adoption of a two-term limit.
President William McKinley and his successor, Theodore Roosevelt
President Reagan surrounded by Secret Service
From left: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Photo taken in the Oval Office on January 7, 2009; Obama formally took office thirteen days later.
Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, 2013
White House, the official residence
Camp David, the official retreat
Blair House, the official guest house
The presidential limousine, dubbed "The Beast"
The presidential plane, called Air Force One when the president is on board
Marine One helicopter, when the president is aboard

Historians believe Roosevelt permanently changed the political system by strengthening the presidency, with some key accomplishments including breaking up trusts, conservationism, labor reforms, making personal character as important as the issues, and hand-picking his successor, William Howard Taft.

Warren Harding, while popular in office, would see his legacy tarnished by scandals, especially Teapot Dome, and Herbert Hoover quickly became very unpopular after failing to alleviate the Great Depression.

Robert M. La Follette

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American lawyer and politician.

American lawyer and politician.

Robert M. La Follette's college yearbook photo, 1879
Portrait from History of the Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, vol. 2, 1898
La Follette addressing a large Chautauqua assembly in Decatur, Illinois, 1905
La Follette in 1908
La Follette in 1912
Time cover, December 3, 1923
La Follette recording a radio speech in 1924, shortly before his death
1924 presidential election results by county. Counties won by La Follette are marked green.
La Follette with his wife and daughter in February 1924

He initially supported President William Howard Taft, but broke with Taft after the latter failed to push a reduction in tariff rates.

After the Republican Party nominated conservative senator Warren G. Harding, La Follette explored a third-party presidential bid, though he ultimately did not seek the presidency because various progressive groups were unable to agree on a platform.

Harry M. Daugherty

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American politician.

American politician.

Gov. Joseph B. Foraker, with whom Daugherty was politically allied as a young man, as he appeared in 1902.
Mark Hanna, a key leader of the Sherman faction of the Ohio Republican Party, as he appeared in 1896.
Ohio Historical Marker at the Fayette County Courthouse in Washington Court House, Ohio
Theodore E. Burton, a Congressman and Senator, was a key Daugherty ally during the first decade of the 20th Century.
U.S. Senator Warren Harding, circa 1918.
Attorney General Harry M. Daugherty in his office.
"N-nothin to it, I tell you!" - 1922 cartoon by C. H. Sykes

A key Ohio Republican political insider, he is best remembered for his service as Attorney General of the United States under Presidents Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge, as well as for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal during Harding's presidency.

Daugherty and Burton aligned themselves with supporters of William Howard Taft, Secretary of War under progressive Republican President Theodore Roosevelt, and together the factional allies forced Foraker out of the United States Senate and into political retirement, aided by muckraking news reports that Foraker had received nearly $30,000 as a political retainer from the Standard Oil Trust.

Seal of Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery

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United States military cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., in whose 639 acre the dead of the nation's conflicts have been buried, beginning with the Civil War, as well as reinterred dead from earlier wars.

United States military cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., in whose 639 acre the dead of the nation's conflicts have been buried, beginning with the Civil War, as well as reinterred dead from earlier wars.

Seal of Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington National Cemetery East Entrance & The Womens Military Museum
Officers of the 8th New York State Militia at Arlington House, June 1861
The Arlington Mansion, when it was known as Custis-Lee Mansion, seen with Union soldiers on its lawn on June 28, 1864
Arlington House
Arlington National Cemetery and the Netherlands Carillon in December 2012
The Old Guard transports the flag-draped casket of the second Sergeant Major of the Army, George W. Dunaway, who was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington National Cemetery
Gravestones at the cemetery are marked by U.S. flags each Memorial Day
A portion of Arlington Woods on Humphreys Drive (2013)
Map showing the Millennium Project's expansion of Arlington National Cemetery into Arlington Woods and Fort Myer
Arlington National Cemetery, Millenium Projects
Wreaths donated by Worcester Wreath company in 2005
Graves of former slaves, marked "Citizen", in Section 27
The interior of Memorial Amphitheater
Arlington Amphitheater 1922 issue
The USS Maine Mast Memorial
The flag at Arlington House is lowered to half-staff during interments.
Military funeral procession in Arlington National Cemetery, July 1967
Respectful silence is requested at the Arlington National Cemetery.
The grave marker of former U.S. President John F. Kennedy

Unknown Soldier of World War I, entombed November 11, 1921; President Warren G. Harding presided

Five state funerals have been held at Arlington: those of Presidents William Howard Taft and John F. Kennedy, his two brothers, Senator Robert F. Kennedy and Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy, as well as General of the Armies John J. Pershing.