A report on Warrior

Recreation of a mounted warrior from the Mongol Empire. The Mongol empire was the second largest empire in history and its military was highly respected and feared.
Samurai, member of the Japanese warrior caste
14th century knight Pippo Spano, member of the Order of the Dragon
Wooden sculpture of an Anglo-Saxon warrior overseeing the faestendic in Joyden's Wood in Kent, England
Roman Warrior painting by Jacques-Louis David, in the Detroit Institute of Arts

Person specializing in combat or warfare as an institutionalized or professionalized career, especially within the context of a tribal or clan-based warrior culture society that recognizes a separate warrior aristocracies, class, or caste.

- Warrior
Recreation of a mounted warrior from the Mongol Empire. The Mongol empire was the second largest empire in history and its military was highly respected and feared.

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A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

Knight

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Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

In the Early Middle Ages in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.

Chohan Rajputs, Delhi (1868)

Rajput

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Large multi-component cluster of castes, kin bodies, and local groups, sharing social status and ideology of genealogical descent originating from the Indian subcontinent.

Large multi-component cluster of castes, kin bodies, and local groups, sharing social status and ideology of genealogical descent originating from the Indian subcontinent.

Chohan Rajputs, Delhi (1868)
Rajputs of Central India
During their centuries-long rule, the Rajputs constructed several palaces. Shown here is the Junagarh Fort in Bikaner, Rajasthan, which was built by the Rathore Rajput rulers
A royal Rajput procession, depicted on a mural at the Mehrangarh Fort in Jodhpur
Karni Mata, Hindu Goddess primarily worshipped by Rajputs
The Rajput bride, illustration in The Oriental Annual, or Scenes of India (1835)
Rajputs of Udaipur playing the game of Puchesee.
An 18th-century Rajput painting by the artist Nihâl Chand.

The term Rajput covers various patrilineal clans historically associated with warriorhood: several clans claim Rajput status, although not all claims are universally accepted.

Samurai in armor in the 1860s; hand-colored photograph by Felice Beato

Samurai

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Samurai (侍) were the hereditary military nobility and officer caste of medieval and early-modern Japan from the late 12th century until their abolition in 1876.

Samurai (侍) were the hereditary military nobility and officer caste of medieval and early-modern Japan from the late 12th century until their abolition in 1876.

Samurai in armor in the 1860s; hand-colored photograph by Felice Beato
Kofun period helmet, gilt copper, 5th century, Ise Province
In the noh drama Sanjō Kokaji, the 10th-century blacksmith Munechika, aided by a kitsune (fox spirit), forges the tachi (samurai sword) Ko-Gitsune Maru.
The Gosannen War in the 11th century.
Heiji rebellion in 1159.
Samurai on horseback, wearing ō-yoroi armor, carrying a bow (yumi) and arrows in an yebira quiver
Samurai ō-yoroi armor, Kamakura period. Tokyo National Museum.
Men and women engaged in battle (16th century illustration).
Samurai of the Shōni clan gather to defend against Kublai Khan's Mongolian army during the first Mongol Invasion of Japan, 1274
Samurai Takezaki Suenaga of the Hōjō clan (right) defeating the Mongolian invasion army (left) at the Battle of Torikai-Gata, 1274
Samurai boarding ships of the Second Mongolian invasion fleet, killing the Mongolian soldiers aboard, 1281.
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Himeji Castle, built from 1333 by the samurai Akamatsu Norimura of the Akamatsu clan.
A hatomune dou from the 16th century, the historic armor was once used by Kenshin Uesugi, one of the most powerful daimyōs of the Sengoku period.
Matchlock
Battle of Nagashino (1575)
Korean and Chinese soldiers assault the Japanese-built fortress at Ulsan during the Japanese invasions of Korea, 1597
Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who would later command the invasion of Korea, leads a small group assaulting the castle on Mount Inaba. Print by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi.
The Battle of Sekigahara, known as "Japan's decisive battle" (天下分け目の戦い, Tenka wakeme no tatakai'')
Samurai were the ruling class during the Tokugawa shogunate.
Kamei Koremi, a samurai and daimyō in the bakumatsu period
A studio photograph of a samurai, taken by Italian–British photographer Felice Beato, c. 1860
Iinuma Sadakichi, a Japanese samurai of the Aizu domain. He was the sole survivor of the famous group of young Byakkotai soldiers who committed suicide on Iimori Hill during the Battle of Aizu.
Samurai holding a severed head. After a battle, enemy's heads were collected and presented to the daimyo.
General Akashi Gidayu preparing to perform Seppuku after losing a battle for his master in 1582. He had just written his death poem.
Painting of Ōishi Yoshio performing seppuku, 1703
Edo-period screen depicting the Battle of Sekigahara. It began on 21 October 1600 with a total of 160,000 men facing each other.
Kōan Ogata, a samurai, physician and rangaku scholar in late Edo period Japan, noted for establishing an academy which later developed into Osaka University.
Toyotomi Hideyoshi with his wives and concubines.
Tomoe Gozen by Shitomi Kangetsu, ca. 18th century
Gyokusen-en, Japanese garden made by a Korean samurai Wakita Naokata and his descendants.
1890s photo showing a variety of armor and weapons typically used by samurai
Mounted samurai with horse armour (uma yoroi or bagai)
Kamakura samurai beheading (head collection)
Statue of samurai Kusunoki Masashige stationed outside Tokyo Imperial Palace.
Kasuga no Tsubone fighting robbers - Adachi Ginko (c.1880)
Hangaku Gozen by Yoshitoshi, ca. 1885
Japanese woman preparing for ritual suicide
Yuki no Kata defending Anotsu castle. 18th century
A samurai class woman.
Cross sections of Japanese sword lamination methods.
Diagram of the Katana sword.
Samurai with various armor and weapons, c. 1802-1814
Antique Japanese tachi
Antique Japanese katana
Antique Japanese wakizashi
Reenactors with Tanegashima at Himeji Castle Festival
Japanese arrow stand with a pair of Yumi bows.
The bow of the Kamakura period
The arrow of the Kamakura period
Ō-yoroi, Kamakura period, 13th-14th century, Kasuga Grand Shrine, National Treasure
Dō-maru with Black and White Lacing. Muromachi period, 15th century, Tokyo National Museum, Important Cultural Property
Toyotomi Hidetsugu's gusoku armour, Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th-17th century, Suntory Museum of Art
Karuta tatami dō gusoku, Edo period. A lightweight portable folding (tatami) armour made from small square or rectangle armor plates called karuta. The karuta are usually connected to each other by chainmail and sewn to a cloth backing.
A re-creation of an armored samurai riding a horse, showing horse armour (uma yoroi or bagai).
Shell-shaped cask (Oitaragainari kawari kabuto), iron and papier-mâché for the shell, beginning of the Edo Period.
Face guard (Menpō). Edo period. Tokyo Fuji Art Museum.
Samurai in armor in the 1860s; hand-colored photograph by Felice Beato
Samurai Takezaki Suenaga of the Hōjō clan (right) assaults the Mongolian invasion army (left) at the Battle of Torikai-Gata, 1274
Kofun period helmet, gilt copper, 5th century, Ise Province
Battle of Yashima folding screens
Antique Japanese wakizashi

In modern usage, bushi is often used as a synonym for samurai; however, historical sources make it clear that bushi and samurai were distinct concepts, with the former referring to soldiers or warriors and the latter referring instead to a kind of hereditary nobility.

Apachean tribes, c. 18th century: WA: Western Apache · N: Navajo · Ch: Chiricahua · M: Mescalero · J: Jicarilla · L: Lipan · Pl: Plains Apache

Apache

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The Apache are a group of culturally related Native American tribes in the Southwestern United States, which include the Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Lipan, Mescalero, Mimbreño, Ndendahe (Bedonkohe or Mogollon and Nednhi or Carrizaleño and Janero), Salinero, Plains (Kataka or Semat or "Kiowa-Apache") and Western Apache (Aravaipa, Pinaleño, Coyotero, Tonto).

The Apache are a group of culturally related Native American tribes in the Southwestern United States, which include the Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Lipan, Mescalero, Mimbreño, Ndendahe (Bedonkohe or Mogollon and Nednhi or Carrizaleño and Janero), Salinero, Plains (Kataka or Semat or "Kiowa-Apache") and Western Apache (Aravaipa, Pinaleño, Coyotero, Tonto).

Apachean tribes, c. 18th century: WA: Western Apache · N: Navajo · Ch: Chiricahua · M: Mescalero · J: Jicarilla · L: Lipan · Pl: Plains Apache
Present-day primary locations of Apachean peoples (scale and colors as above)
Kathy Kitcheyan, chairwoman of the San Carlos Apache
Essa-queta, Plains Apache chief
Young Jicarilla Apache boy, New Mexico, 2009
A Western Apache woman from the San Carlos group
Apache rawhide playing cards c. 1875–1885, collection of NMAI.
The Coronado Expedition, 1540–1542
Geronimo
Apache bride
Apache Indian girl carrying an olla (a water basket) on her head, ca.1900
Hide painting depicting Apache girl's puberty ceremony, by Naiche (Chiricahua Apache), ca. 1900, Oklahoma History Center
Frame of Apache wickiup
Various Apache containers: baskets, bowls and jars. The women-made baskets could hold heavy loads and were made mainly from yucca or willow leaves or juniper bark.
Apache jug
Apache girl with basket, 1902

In 19th-century confrontations during the American-Indian wars, the U.S. Army found the Apache to be fierce warriors and skillful strategists.

Comitatus

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In ancient times the Latin term for an armed escort or retinue.

In ancient times the Latin term for an armed escort or retinue.

The term is used especially in the context of Germanic warrior culture for a warband tied to a leader by an oath of fealty and describes the relations between a lord and his retainers, or thanes (OE þegn).

Eso Ikoyi

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Eso Ikoyi (also appearing as Esho Ikoyi) is an aristocratic attribute amongst the Yoruba people which denotes an eminent warrior.

Statue of king Cankili II in Jaffna

Karaiyar

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Sri Lankan Tamil caste found mainly on the northern and eastern coastal areas of Sri Lanka, and globally among the Tamil diaspora.

Sri Lankan Tamil caste found mainly on the northern and eastern coastal areas of Sri Lanka, and globally among the Tamil diaspora.

Statue of king Cankili II in Jaffna
The Makara flag of the Karaiyars

The community known for their maritime history, are also reputed as a warrior caste who contributed as army and navy soldiers of Tamil kings.

A Kshatriya man

Kshatriya

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A Kshatriya man

Kshatriya (क्षत्रिय) (from Sanskrit kṣatra, "rule, authority") is one of the four varna (social orders) of Hindu society, associated with warrior aristocracy.

Jung Khalsa warriors playing Gatka and Shastar Vidya

Khalsa

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Khalsa (ਖ਼ਾਲਸਾ,, ) refers to both a community that considers Sikhism as its faith, as well as a special group of initiated Sikhs.

Khalsa (ਖ਼ਾਲਸਾ,, ) refers to both a community that considers Sikhism as its faith, as well as a special group of initiated Sikhs.

Jung Khalsa warriors playing Gatka and Shastar Vidya
Jung Khalsa warriors playing Gatka and Shastar Vidya
19th century Akali Sikh warriors.
Nishan Sahib in blue, at Akali Phoola Singh di Burj in Amritsar
A 1999 stamp dedicated to the 300th anniversary of Khalsa
Keshgarh Sahib Gurudwara at Anandpur Sahib, Punjab, the birthplace of Khalsa
A fresco of Guru Gobind Singh and the Panj Piare.
Kanga, Kara and Kirpan – three of the five Ks
Akalis at the Holy Tank
Khalsa principles of Deg to cook food (langar) in huge amount
A group of Khalsa Sikhs
Guru Nanak dev ji along with his devotees from different backgrounds
An inscription naming the five members of the Khalsa Panth, at Takht Keshgarh Sahib, the birthplace of Khalsa on Baisakh 1, 1756 Vikram Samvat.
The creation of the Khalsa; initiated by Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru.

Guru Gobind Singh created and initiated the Khalsa as a warrior with a duty to protect the innocent from Islamic religious persecution.

An Aztec Jaguar warrior

Jaguar warrior

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Jaguar warriors or jaguar knights, ocēlōtl (singular) or ocēlōmeh (plural) were members of the Aztec military elite.

Jaguar warriors or jaguar knights, ocēlōtl (singular) or ocēlōmeh (plural) were members of the Aztec military elite.

An Aztec Jaguar warrior
Bronze relief by Jesús Fructuoso Contreras depicting Cacamatzin as a jaguar warrior

They were a type of Aztec warrior called a cuāuhocēlōtl.