Wars of Alexander the Great

conquests of Alexander the GreatconquestsAlexander's conquestsAlexander the GreatAlexander the Great's conquest of PersiaAlexander the Great's conquestsAlexander's conquestseries of campaigns4th-century-BC conquestsAlexander invaded the region
The wars of Alexander the Great were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon ("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India.wikipedia
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Alexander the Great

AlexanderAlexander III of MacedonAlexander of Macedon
The wars of Alexander the Great were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon ("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India.
In 334 BC, he invaded the Achaemenid Empire (Persian Empire) and began a series of campaigns that lasted 10 years.

Macedonia (ancient kingdom)

MacedonMacedoniaancient Macedonia
The wars of Alexander the Great were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon ("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India. Alexander assumed the kingship of Macedonia following the death of his father Philip II, who had unified most of the city-states of mainland Greece under Macedonian hegemony in a federation called the Hellenic League.
During Alexander's subsequent campaign of conquest, he overthrew the Achaemenid Empire and conquered territory that stretched as far as the Indus River.

Philip II of Macedon

Philip IIPhilip of MacedonPhilip
Alexander assumed the kingship of Macedonia following the death of his father Philip II, who had unified most of the city-states of mainland Greece under Macedonian hegemony in a federation called the Hellenic League.
However, his assassination by a royal bodyguard, Pausanias of Orestis, led to the immediate succession of his son Alexander, who would go on to invade the Achaemenid Empire in his father's stead.

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
Alexander assumed the kingship of Macedonia following the death of his father Philip II, who had unified most of the city-states of mainland Greece under Macedonian hegemony in a federation called the Hellenic League. By the time of his death, he had conquered most of the world known to the ancient Greeks.
The Hellenistic period lasted from 323 BC, which marked the end of the wars of Alexander the Great, to the annexation of Greece by the Roman Republic in 146 BC.

Achaemenid Empire

AchaemenidPersianPersian Empire
The wars of Alexander the Great were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon ("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India. Although being successful as a military commander, he failed to provide any stable alternative to the Achaemenid Empire —his untimely death threw the vast territories he conquered into civil war.
In 334 BC, when Darius was just succeeding in subduing Egypt again, Alexander and his battle-hardened troops invaded Asia Minor.

Darius III

DariusDarius III of PersiaDarius III Codomannus
The wars of Alexander the Great were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon ("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India.
This invasion, which marked the beginning of the Wars of Alexander the Great, was followed almost immediately by the victory of Alexander over the Persians at Battle of the Granicus.

Siege of Tyre (332 BC)

Siege of Tyresiegeagainst Tyre
The Siege of Tyre occurred in 332 BC when Alexander set out to conquer Tyre, a strategic coastal base.
The Siege of Tyre was orchestrated by Alexander the Great in 332 BC during his campaigns against the Persians.

Persepolis

Apadana PalacePersepolitanPerspolis
A Royal Road connected Susa with the more eastern capitals of Persepolis and Pasargadae in Persis (the Persian Empire had several "capitals"), and was the natural venue for Alexander's continued campaign.
After invading Achaemenid Persia in 330 BC, Alexander the Great sent the main force of his army to Persepolis by the Royal Road.

Bessus

Artaxerxes VBessos
Darius escaped with a small core of his forces remaining intact, although the Bactrian cavalry and Bessus soon caught up with him.
But since most of the Persian Empire had already been conquered and Bessus only ruled over a loose alliance of those provinces not yet occupied by the Macedonians, historians do not generally regard him as an official King of Kings of Persia.

Battle of the Granicus

Battle of GranicusGranicusBattle of the Granicus River
The Battle of the Granicus River in May 334 BC was fought in Northwestern Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey), near the site of Troy.

Siege of Halicarnassus

defense of Halicarnassussiege to the citysieges of Halicarnassus (334 BC)
The Siege of Halicarnassus was undertaken in 334 BC.

Battle of Issus

IssusFirst Battle of IssusAlexander the Great defeated Darius
The battle of Issus took place in November 333 BC.

Sogdia

SogdianaSogdianSogdians
The Siege of the Sogdian Rock, a fortress located north of Bactria in Sogdiana, occurred in 327 BC.
When the latter invaded the Persian Empire, Pharasmanes, an already independent king of Khwarezm, allied with the Macedonians and sent troops to Alexander in 329 BC for his war against the Scythians of the Black Sea region (even though this anticipated campaign never materialized).

Battle of Gaugamela

GaugamelaArbelaBattle of Arbela
The Battle of Gaugamela took place in 331 BC in what is now Iraqi Kurdistan, possibly near Dohuk, and resulted in a decisive victory for the Macedonians.

Sogdian Rock

Siege of the Sogdian RockRock of AriamazesPersian rocks
The Siege of the Sogdian Rock, a fortress located north of Bactria in Sogdiana, occurred in 327 BC.

Battle of the Hydaspes

Battle of the Hydaspes RiverBattle of HydaspesHydaspes
After gaining control of the former Achaemenid satrapy of Gandhara, including the city of Taxila, Alexander advanced into Punjab, where he engaged in battle against the regional king Porus, whom Alexander defeated in the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC, but was so impressed by the demeanor with which the king carried himself that he allowed Porus to continue governing his own kingdom as a satrap.

Uxii

UxiansUxian
During Alexander's conquest of Persia, the Uxians were led by Madates.

Roman–Persian Wars

Roman-Persian WarsRoman-Sassanid WarsRoman–Persian War
According to the Letter of Tansar and the Muslim writer Al-Tha'alibi, Ardashir I's and Pacorus I's invasions, respectively, of Roman territories were to avenge Alexander the Great's conquest of Persia, which was thought to be the cause of the subsequent Iranian disarray.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
The wars of Alexander the Great were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon ("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India.

South Asia

SouthSouth AsianSouthern Asia
However, he failed to conquer South Asia.

Wars of the Diadochi

First War of the DiadochiFourth War of the DiadochiDiadochi wars
Although being successful as a military commander, he failed to provide any stable alternative to the Achaemenid Empire —his untimely death threw the vast territories he conquered into civil war.

Polis

poleiscity-statescity-state
Alexander assumed the kingship of Macedonia following the death of his father Philip II, who had unified most of the city-states of mainland Greece under Macedonian hegemony in a federation called the Hellenic League.

League of Corinth

Hellenic LeagueCorinthian Leagueleague of the Greeks
Alexander assumed the kingship of Macedonia following the death of his father Philip II, who had unified most of the city-states of mainland Greece under Macedonian hegemony in a federation called the Hellenic League.

Syria

Syrian Arab RepublicSyrianEtymology of Syria
His conquests included Anatolia, Syria, Phoenicia, Judea, Gaza, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia and Bactria, and he extended the boundaries of his own empire as far as Taxila, India.

Phoenicia

PhoeniciansPhoenicianPhoenicio
His conquests included Anatolia, Syria, Phoenicia, Judea, Gaza, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia and Bactria, and he extended the boundaries of his own empire as far as Taxila, India.