Washington, D.C.

Looking West at the Capitol & the Mall, Washington DC
Historical coat of arms, as recorded in 1876
Following their victory at the Battle of Bladensburg (1814), the British entered Washington, D.C., burning down buildings, including the White House.
President Abraham Lincoln insisted that construction of the United States Capitol dome continue during the American Civil War (1861).
Crowds surrounding the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool during the March on Washington, 1963
Satellite photo of Washington, D.C. by ESA
The Washington Monument, seen across the Tidal Basin during 2007's National Cherry Blossom Festival
The L'Enfant Plan for Washington, D.C., as revised by Andrew Ellicott in 1792
Looking Northwest at the Mall, Washington DC
Looking West from RFK Stadium, Washington DC
Construction of the 12-story Cairo Apartment Building (1894) in the Dupont Circle neighborhood spurred building height restrictions.
The Georgetown neighborhood is known for its historic Federal-style rowhouses. In the foreground is the 19th century Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.
Meridian Hill Park, in Columbia Heights
Map of racial distribution in Washington, D.C., according to the 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
D.C. police on Harley-Davidson motorcycles escort a protest in 2018.
Federal Triangle, between Constitution Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue. The U.S. federal government accounts for about 29% of D.C. jobs.
The Lincoln Memorial receives about six million visits annually.
The Smithsonian Institution is the world's largest research and museum complex. Like its administration building, known as The Castle, many of its museums are on the National Mall.
The National Gallery of Art
The Kennedy Center for Performing Arts is home to the Washington National Opera and National Symphony Orchestra.
Nationals Park in the Navy Yard area on the Anacostia River
is the home of the Washington Nationals baseball team.
The hometown Washington Capitals NHL hockey team plays in Penn Quarter's Capital One Arena; the arena is also home to the Washington Wizards NBA basketball team.
One Franklin Square: The Washington Post Building on Franklin Square
The Watergate complex was the site of the Watergate Scandal, which led to President Nixon's resignation.
The John A. Wilson Building houses the offices of the mayor of Washington and the Council of the District of Columbia.
The Eisenhower Executive Office Building, once the world's largest office building, houses the Executive Office of the President of the United States.
The Library of Congress is one of the world's largest libraries, with more than 167 million cataloged items.
Georgetown Day at Georgetown University
A Blue Line train at Farragut West, an underground station on the Washington Metro
Washington Union Station is one of the busiest rail stations in the United States.
I-66 in Washington, D.C.
The Capitol Power Plant, built to supply energy for the U.S. Capitol Complex, is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol.

Capital city and only federal district of the United States.

- Washington, D.C.

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Map of Washington, D.C., with Georgetown highlighted in maroon.

Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)

Map of Washington, D.C., with Georgetown highlighted in maroon.
Oak Hill Cemetery Chapel, designed by James Renwick Jr. in 1850, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Bank on the corner of M Street & Wisconsin Avenue
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
The Old Stone House, built 1765, is the oldest house in Washington, D.C.
Georgetown around 1862. Overview of the C&O Canal, Aqueduct Bridge at right, and unfinished Capitol dome in the distant background.
Sailing vessels docked at the Georgetown waterfront, c. 1865
Children playing on sidewalk in Georgetown during the Great Depression, Carl Mydans, 1935
The Washington Harbour complex located on the Potomac River. Healy Hall is visible in the background.
Shops along Wisconsin Avenue
Hyde-Addison School
Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School
Healy Hall at Georgetown University.
Francis Scott Key Bridge across the Potomac River, connecting Georgetown to Rosslyn, Virginia
The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal passes through Georgetown.
Enlargeable diagram of Washington area trolley lines:
Orange = Washington, Arlington & Mount Vernon Electric Railway.
Blue = Washington, Arlington & Falls Church Railway (WA&FC).
Yellow = Nauck (Fort Myer) line of WA&FC.
Light green = W&OD Bluemont Division.
Dark green = W&OD Great Falls Division.
The "Exorcist steps"

Georgetown is a historic neighborhood and commercial and entertainment district located in Northwest Washington, D.C., situated along the Potomac River.

Personified Columbia in American flag gown and Phrygian cap, which signifies freedom and the pursuit of liberty, from a World War I patriotic poster

Columbia (personification)

Female national personification of the United States.

Female national personification of the United States.

Personified Columbia in American flag gown and Phrygian cap, which signifies freedom and the pursuit of liberty, from a World War I patriotic poster
Personification of the Americas in Meissen porcelain, c. 1760, from a set of the Four Continents.
Columbia and an early rendition of Uncle Sam in an 1869 Thomas Nast cartoon having Thanksgiving dinner with a diverse group of immigrants
John Gast's 1872 painting, American Progress, depicts Columbia as the Spirit of the Frontier, carrying telegraph lines across the Western frontier to fulfill manifest destiny.
After the United States gained independence from Britain, South Carolina named its new capital city Columbia
Columbia wearing a warship bearing the words "World Power" as her "Easter bonnet" (cover of Puck, April 6, 1901)
U.S. half dollar coin known as Walking Liberty
The logo that Columbia used starting in 1936 and ending in 1976. This version was used on the Color Rhapsody cartoons.
Political cartoon from 1860 depicting Stephen A. Douglas receiving a spanking from Columbia as Uncle Sam looks on approvingly
A defiant Columbia in an 1871 Thomas Nast cartoon shown protecting a defenseless Chinese man from an angry Irish lynch mob that has just burned down an orphanage
Columbia in an 1865 Thomas Nast cartoon asking the government to allow black soldiers to vote
Carte de visite (c. 1866) featuring a woman dressed as Columbia and a man dressed as a Revolutionary War general
Columbia (representing the American people) reaches out to oppressed Cuba with blindfolded Uncle Sam in background (Judge, February 6, 1897; cartoon by Grant E. Hamilton)
Columbia from a Columbia Records phonograph cylinder package
Columbia at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific
Lady Columbia recognized World War I Doughboy soldier as having suffered injury due to his willingness to serve humanity
Columbia Calls – Enlist Now for U.S. Army, World War I recruitment poster by Vincent Aderente
Columbia depicted in an American Committee for Relief in the Near East poster

The association has given rise to the names of many American places, objects, institutions and companies, including the District of Columbia; Columbia, South Carolina; Columbia University; "Hail, Columbia" and Columbia Rediviva; the Columbia River.

West front (2013)

United States Capitol

Meeting place of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

Meeting place of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

West front (2013)
United States Capitol and reflecting pool
The east front of the United States Capitol (2013 view)
The east front at night (2013 view)
Design for the U.S. Capitol, "An Elevation for a Capitol", by James Diamond was one of many submitted in the 1792 contest, but not selected.
The winning design for the U.S. Capitol, submitted by William Thornton
Samuel Morse's 1822 painting of the House in session shows the interior design of the House chamber.
The Capitol when first occupied by Congress (painting circa 1800 by William Russell Birch)
The Capitol from Pennsylvania Avenue as it stood before 1814 (drawn from memory by an unknown artist after the burning)
Daguerreotype of east side of the Capitol in 1846, by John Plumbe, showing Bulfinch's dome
The Capitol in 1814 after the burning of Washington by the British, during the War of 1812 (painting by George Munger)
The earliest known interior photograph of the Capitol, taken in 1860 and showing the new House of Representatives chamber
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln in 1861, before the partially complete Capitol dome
Capitol Rotunda (2013 view)
The Apotheosis of Washington, the 1865 fresco painted by Constantino Brumidi on the interior of the Capitol's dome (2005 view)
Carlo Franzoni's 1819 sculptural chariot clock, the Car of History, depicting Clio, the Greek muse of history. National Statuary Hall (2006 view).
Capitol Rotunda (2005 view)
Declaration of Independence (1819), by John Trumbull
National Statuary Hall Collection viewed from the south
Capitol Crypt
President George W. Bush delivering the annual State of the Union address in the House chamber
Old Supreme Court Chamber (2007 view)
US Senate chamber (circa 1873 view)
A 2007 aerial view of the Capitol Grounds from the west
Magnolias bloom on the Capitol Grounds in March 2020
The body of former President Ronald Reagan lying in state in June 2004
Exterior of the Capitol prior to the 2015 visit by Pope Francis
2021 United States Capitol attack
The opening ceremony of the Capitol Visitor Center in December 2008. The plaster cast model of the Statue of Freedom is in the foreground.
The Capitol on a 1922 US postage stamp
A snowball fight on the Capitol lawn, 1923.
The Capitol at night in 2006
The Capitol surrounded by snow in 2011
House of Representatives pediment, Apotheosis of Democracy, by Paul Wayland Bartlett, 1916
The Genius of America pediment, East Portico, carved by Bruno Mankowski 1959-60 (after Luigi Persico's 1825-1828 original)

It is located on Capitol Hill at the eastern end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Though no longer at the geographic center of the federal district, the Capitol forms the origin point for the district's street-numbering system and the district's four quadrants.

2020 United States census

The twenty-fourth decennial United States census.

The twenty-fourth decennial United States census.

2020 U.S. census yard sign in Columbus, Ohio
Allocation of districts following the 2020 census.
Average Annual Population Growth Rate in each county of the fifty states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico between 2010 and 2020 according to the U.S. Census Bureau
Equipment issued to, or used by, enumerators during non-response followups. Clockwise: black canvas bag with census logo, hand sanitizer, iPhone8, notice-of-visit forms, privacy notice forms, mask.
A map showing the population change of each US State by percentage.

The census recorded a resident population of 331,449,281 in the fifty states and the District of Columbia, an increase of 7.4 percent, or 22,703,743, over the preceding decade.

Satellite photo of the Washington metropolitan area

Washington metropolitan area

Satellite photo of the Washington metropolitan area
Map highlighting labor patterns of regional counties
View of downtown Washington, with the skylines of Arlington and Tysons Corner in the distance.
The average household income within a 5 mi radius of Tysons Corner Center is $174,809.
Rosslyn is home to the tallest high-rises in the region, partly due to the District's height restrictions. As a result, many of the region's tallest buildings are outside the city proper.
NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda.
Capital One Tower in Tysons, the tallest building in the region and centerpiece of the 5000000 sqft headquarter campus for Capital One.
NGA headquarters in Fort Belvoir.
Washington Dulles International Airport
The Metro Center station on the Washington Metro

The Washington metropolitan area, also commonly referred to as the National Capital Region, is the metropolitan area centered on Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.

Mid-Atlantic (United States)

Region of the United States generally located in the overlap between the Northeastern and Southeastern States.

Region of the United States generally located in the overlap between the Northeastern and Southeastern States.

Shipping containers at the Port Newark–Elizabeth Marine Terminal, part of the Port of New York and New Jersey.
New York
Philadelphia
Baltimore
Washington, D.C.
A USGS fact-sheet interpretation of the Mid-Atlantic in terms of groundwater.<ref>Earl A. Greene et al. "Ground-Water Vulnerability to Nitrate Contamination in the Mid-Atlantic Region". USGS Fact Sheet FS 2004-3067. 2005. Retrieved 25 April 2013. Note: Although the locator map appears to exclude part of northwestern Pennsylvania, other more detailed maps in this article include all of the state.</ref>
An 1897 map displays an inclusive definition of the Mid-Atlantic region.
An 1886 "Harper's School Geography" map showing the region, exclusive of Virginia and West Virginia.
The U.S. Census Bureau Regions and Divisions, displaying an exclusive three-state definition of the Middle Atlantic.

Its exact definition differs upon source, but the region typically includes Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.

The United States Congress has ultimate authority over the District.

District of Columbia home rule

The United States Congress has ultimate authority over the District.
The John A. Wilson Building is home to the mayor and the 13 members of the Council of the District of Columbia.
Robert Brent, first mayor of the City of Washington
Each of the city's eight wards is further divided into local Advisory Neighborhood Commissions.
This button was used in a 1974 referendum campaign encouraging residents of the District of Columbia to vote for the Home Rule Charter.
Walter Washington, the First elected Mayor of the District of Columbia

District of Columbia home rule is District of Columbia residents' ability to govern their local affairs.

Neighborhoods in Washington, D.C.

Neighborhoods in Washington, D.C.

Neighborhoods in Washington, D.C.
The eight wards of Washington D.C. (2012–2022). (Individual ward maps are for 2002–2011.)
Ward 1
Ward 2
Ward 3
Ward 4
Ward 5
Ward 6
Ward 7
Ward 8

Neighborhoods in Washington, D.C., are distinguished by their history, culture, architecture, demographics, and geography.

IMF Headquarters (Washington, DC)

International Monetary Fund

IMF Headquarters (Washington, DC)
IMF Headquarters (Washington, DC)
Board of Governors International Monetary Fund (1999)
IMF Data Dissemination Systems participants:
Plaque Commemorating the Formation of the IMF in July 1944 at the Bretton Woods Conference
The Gold Room within the Mount Washington Hotel where the Bretton Woods Conference attendees signed the agreements creating the IMF and World Bank
First page of the Articles of Agreement of the International Monetary Fund, 1 March 1946. Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs archives
On 28 June 2011, Christine Lagarde was named managing director of the IMF, replacing Dominique Strauss-Kahn.
Anarchist protest against the IMF and corporate bailout

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international financial institution, headquartered in Washington, D.C., consisting of 190 countries.

The National Mall in March 2010, facing east from above the Potomac River

National Mall

Landscaped park within the National Mall and Memorial Parks, an official unit of the United States National Park System.

Landscaped park within the National Mall and Memorial Parks, an official unit of the United States National Park System.

The National Mall in March 2010, facing east from above the Potomac River
National Mall proper and adjacent areas (April 2002). The Mall had a grassy lawn flanked on each side by unpaved paths and rows of American elm trees as its central feature. (Numbers in the image correspond to numbers in the list of landmarks, museums and other features below.)
Andrew Downing Jackson Urn in May 2012
June 2004 view from the United States Capitol, facing west across the National Mall towards the Washington Monument
Facing east on the National Mall, as viewed near the 1300 block of Jefferson Drive, S.W. in April 2010. Rows of American elm trees line the sides of a path traversing the length of the Mall.
West side of the U.S. Capitol building (September 2013)
The Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool in July 2005, facing east towards the Washington Monument
The view of the Lincoln Memorial from the Reflecting Pool in April 2007.
National World War II Memorial (July 2017)
The west side of the Jefferson Pier in April 2011, with the Washington Monument in the background.
Rows of young American elm trees on the National Mall, looking east from the top of the Washington Monument circa 1942
This view from the top of the Washington Monument shows rows of elm trees lining the Reflecting Pool (November 2014).
Portrait of the Mall and vicinity looking northwest from southeast of the U.S. Capitol circa 1846-1855, showing stables in the foreground, the Washington City Canal behind them, the Capitol on the right and the Smithsonian "Castle", the Washington Monument and the Potomac River in the distant left.
The Lockkeeper's House in 2018, looking northwest
Route of the Washington City Canal, showing the Mall (1851)
The Smithsonian Institution Building ("The Castle") in February 2007, looking north from the Enid A. Haupt Garden
The National Mall was the centerpiece of the 1902 McMillan Plan. A central open vista traversed the length of the Mall.
Eastward view of the National Mall from the top of the Washington Monument in 1918. The three structures and two chimneys crossing the Mall are temporary World War I buildings A, B and C and parts of their central power plant.
Westward view from the top of the Washington Monument in 1943 or 1944 during World War II. In the foreground, temporary buildings on the Washington Monument grounds house the Navy's Bureau of Ships. The Main Navy and Munitions Buildings stand to the right of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool. Temporary buildings to the left of the Reflecting Pool house the Navy's Bureau of Supplies and Accounts.
Uncle Beazley on the National Mall between 1980 and 1994
National Park Service map showing the National Mall's designated reserve area referenced in the 2003 Commemorative Works Clarification and Revision Act
Barricade blocking walkway adjacent to the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool during the 2013 federal government shutdown, looking east toward the Washington Monument undergoing repair
Aerial view of the Mall facing west between 1980 and 1999
Looking east from the top of the Washington Monument towards the National Mall and the United States Capitol in December 1999
2007 aerial view of Capitol Hill and the National Mall, facing west
Inlay of L'Enfant Plan in Freedom Plaza, looking northwest in June 2005 from the observation deck in the Old Post Office Building Clock Tower
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (June 2010)
National Christmas Tree (November 28, 2018)
A Christmas tree in front of the Capitol in December of 2013.
Tidal Basin and Jefferson Memorial at dusk, facing south in October 2011.
L'Enfant Promenade (August 2013)
1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on the National Mall facing east from the Lincoln Memorial
The first inauguration of Barack Obama on January 20, 2009, facing west from the Capitol
Independence Day fireworks display between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial, July 4, 1986
The April 9, 1939, concert by Marian Anderson, facing east from the Lincoln Memorial
Britney Spears performs during the "NFL Kickoff Live from the National Mall Presented by Pepsi Vanilla" concert, September 4, 2003
The Concert for Valor on the National Mall on November 11, 2014, looking west from the United States Capitol grounds
The Smithsonian station on the Washington Metro in 2005
1863 photograph of the National Mall and vicinity during the Civil War, looking west towards the U.S. Botanical Garden, Washington City Canal, Gas Works, railroad tracks, Washington Armory, and Armory Square Hospital buildings. The Smithsonian Institution Building, the uncompleted Washington Monument (behind the Smithsonian's building), and the Potomac River are in the background.
The Victorian landscaping and architecture of the Mall looking east from the top of the Washington Monument, showing the influence of the Downing Plan and Adolph Cluss on the National Mall circa 1904. The Department of Agriculture Building, and above it, "The Castle", are in the foreground. A railroad route leading to a shed attached to the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad station (not visible) crosses the Mall behind the Arts and Industry Building, the Army Medical Center, and the Armory.
View looking north of the National Mall with the Treasury Building in the background in April 1865.
View the National Mall with its livestock and the Treasury Building in the background in April 1865.
Looking east from the top of the Washington Monument towards the United States Capitol in the summer of 1901. The Mall exhibited the Victorian-era landscape of winding paths and random plantings that Andrew Jackson Downing designed in the 1850s
The Armory as a hospital during the Civil War
Department of Agriculture Building (circa 1895)
<center>Center Market circa 1875, looking northwest from The Mall</center>
Center Market between 1910 and 1930, looking southwest from 7th Street NW (at left)
Arts and Industries Building, looking southwest (March 2017)
Baltimore and Potomac Railroad station, looking southwest from 6th Street NW (at bottom and left)
Army Medical Museum and Library, looking northeast from Independence Avenue SW
Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool before reconstruction (April 2010)
Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool undergoing reconstruction (June 2011)
Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool undergoing reconstruction (December 2011)
Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool after reconstruction (May 2016)
Axis of National Mall before restoration (July 2012)
Axis of National Mall undergoing restoration (April 2015)
Axis of National Mall undergoing restoration (October 2015)
Axis of National Mall after restoration (September 2016)
Aerial view of National Mall, Looking South

It is located near the downtown area of Washington, D.C., the capital city of the United States, and is administered by the National Park Service (NPS) of the United States Department of the Interior.