A report on Washington Square Park

Statue of Giuseppe Garibaldi
Hangman's Elm
Washington Square, in the New York Public Library collection
Washington Square Arch
Washington Arch, circa 1893 by Childe Hassam
Close-up of the Washington Square Arch
The central fountain, with the Philip Johnson-designed Bobst Library on the right
Visitors wading in the fountain
Chess players in the southwest corner of the park

9.75 acre public park in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City.

- Washington Square Park
Statue of Giuseppe Garibaldi

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Greenwich Village

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Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

Neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 14th Street to the north, Broadway to the east, Houston Street to the south, and the Hudson River to the west.

MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village
453–461 Sixth Avenue in the Historic District
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets
Street signs at intersection of West 10th and West 4th Streets
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made ca. 1766 for Henry Moore, royal governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than 2 miles (3 km) from the city.
Gay Street at the corner of Waverly Place; the street's name refers to a colonial family, not the LGBT character of Greenwich Village
Whitney Museum of American Art's original location, at 8–12 West 8th Street, between Fifth Avenue and MacDougal Street; currently home to the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
The Cherry Lane Theatre is located in Greenwich Village.
The annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade is the world's largest Halloween parade.
The Stonewall Inn, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
Blue Note Jazz Club
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of Greenwich Village and nearby New York University
396-397 West Street at West 10th Street is a former hotel which dates from 1904, and is part of the Weehawken Street Historic District
Washington Mews in Greenwich Village; an NYU building can be seen in the background
Christopher Park, part of the Stonewall National Monument
NYPD 6th Precinct
West Village Post Office
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Robert De Niro
Robert Downey Jr.
Hank Greenberg
Emma Stone
90 Bedford Street, used for establishing shot in Friends

Greenwich Village contains Washington Square Park, as well as two of New York City's private colleges, New York University (NYU) and The New School.

New York City

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Most populous city in the United States.

Most populous city in the United States.

New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York"
Fort George and the City of New York c. 1731. Royal Navy ships of the line are seen guarding what would become New York Harbor.
Columbia University was founded by royal charter in 1754 under the name of King's College.
The Battle of Long Island, the largest battle of the American Revolution, took place in Brooklyn in 1776.
Broadway follows the Native American Wickquasgeck Trail through Manhattan.
The current 5 boroughs of Greater New York as they appeared in 1814. Bronx was in Westchester County, Queens County included modern Nassau County, Kings County had 6 towns, one of which was Brooklyn, New York City is shown by hatching in southern New York County on the island of Manhattan, and Richmond County on Staten Island.
A construction worker atop the Empire State Building as it was being built in 1930. The Chrysler Building is behind him.
Manhattan's Little Italy, Lower East Side, circa 1900
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
The core of the New York City metropolitan area, with Manhattan Island at its center
Lower and Midtown Manhattan, as seen by a SkySat satellite in 2017
Central Park in Winter by Raymond Speers, in Munsey's Magazine, February 1900
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park was used in both the 1939 and 1964 New York World's Fair, with the Unisphere as the centerpiece of the latter and which remains today.
The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals of freedom, democracy, and opportunity.
View of The Pond and Midtown Manhattan from the Gapstow Bridge in Central Park, one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, in 2019
California sea lions play at the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
A map of racial distribution in New York, 2010 U.S. census. Each dot is 25 people:
The landmark Neo-Gothic Roman Catholic St. Patrick's Cathedral, Midtown Manhattan
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish community in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.
The Islamic Cultural Center of New York in Upper Manhattan was the first mosque built in New York City.
Ganesh Temple in Flushing, Queens, is the oldest Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
The Deutsche Bank Center as viewed from Central Park West
Times Square is the hub of the Broadway theater district and a media center. It also has one of the highest annual attendance rates of any tourist attraction in the world, estimated at 50 million.
The I Love New York logo, designed by Milton Glaser in 1977
Rockefeller Center is home to NBC Studios.
Times Square Studios, home of Good Morning America
Butler Library at Columbia University, described as one of the most beautiful college libraries in the United States
The Washington Square Arch, an unofficial icon of both New York University (NYU) and its Greenwich Village neighborhood
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, affiliated with Columbia University and Cornell University, the largest hospital and largest private employer in New York City and one of the world's busiest
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest police force in the United States.
Police officers of New York Police Department (NYPD)
The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) is the largest municipal fire department in the United States.
The Stephen A. Schwarzman Headquarters Building of the New York Public Library, at 5th Avenue and 42nd Street
The fast-paced streets of New York City, January 2020
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, part of Museum Mile, is one of the largest museums in the world.
Smorgasburg opened in 2011 as an open-air food market and is part of the Brooklyn Flea.
As of 2012, the city had about 6,000 hybrid taxis (shown) in service, the largest number of any city in North America.
New York City Hall is the oldest City Hall in the United States that still houses its original governmental functions.
The New York County Courthouse houses the New York Supreme Court and other offices.
Eric Adams, the current and 110th Mayor of New York City
New York City is home to the two busiest train stations in the U.S., including Grand Central Terminal.
The New York City Subway is the world's largest rapid transit system by number of stations.
The Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world's busiest bus station, at 8th Avenue and 42nd Street
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The Staten Island Ferry shuttles commuters between Manhattan and Staten Island.
Yellow medallion taxicabs are widely recognized icons of the city.
8th Avenue, looking northward ("uptown"). Most streets and avenues in Manhattan's grid plan incorporate a one-way traffic configuration.
The George Washington Bridge, connecting Upper Manhattan (background) from Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.
The growing skyline of Long Island City, Queens (background),<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-30/nyc-s-fastest-growing-neighborhood-gets-180-million-investment|title=NYC's Fastest-Growing Neighborhood Gets $180 Million Investment|first=Henry|last=Goldman|date=October 30, 2018|publisher=Bloomberg L.P|access-date=October 30, 2018}}</ref> facing the East River and Manhattan in May 2017
The Grand Concourse in the Bronx, foreground, with Manhattan in the background in February 2018
St. George, Staten Island as seen from the Staten Island Ferry, the world's busiest passenger-only ferry system, shuttling passengers between Manhattan and Staten Island
The Asia gate entrance to the Bronx Zoo, the world's largest metropolitan zoo.
The Spanish Harlem Orchestra. New York City is home to nearly 3 million Latino Americans, the largest Hispanic population of any city outside Latin America and Spain.
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan including Wall Street, the world's principal financial center

Washington Square Park is a prominent landmark in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan. The Washington Square Arch at the northern gateway to the park is an iconic symbol of both New York University and Greenwich Village.

New York University

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Private research university in New York City.

Private research university in New York City.

Albert Gallatin (1761–1849) by Gilbert Stuart
NYU Building in Washington Square, 1850
The University Heights campus, now home to Bronx Community College
Washington Square Park, with its gateway arch, is surrounded largely by NYU buildings and plays an integral role in the university's campus life.
Bobst Library
Bern Dibner Library of Science and Technology on the Brooklyn campus
NYU Langone Health
NYU Abu Dhabi
NYU Shanghai
Washington Square Village, home to NYU faculty and graduate students
A bus system transports students to and from the far ends of campus.
Jack Dorsey, American billionaire and internet entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Twitter and Square, Inc.; CAS (dropped out)
Robert Muller III, American public official; lead director of the Special Counsel investigation, author of the Mueller Report, former Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; GSAS '67
Alan Greenspan, American economist and public official; former long-time Chairman of the Federal Reserve; Stern '48, '50, '77
Carol Bellamy, American politician; former executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF); Law '68
Ma Ying-jeou, Taiwanese politician; Former President of the Republic of China; Law '76
Jonas Salk, American biologist; creator of the polio vaccine; founder of the Salk Institute; Medicine '39
Martin Scorsese, American filmmaker, director and actor; AFI Life Achievement Award winner, 20-time Academy Award winner, 23-time BAFTA winner, 11-time Golden Globes winner; CAS '64, Steinhardt '68
Spike Lee, American filmmaker, director and producer; two-time Academy Award winner; two-time Emmy Award winner; Tisch '83
Ang Lee OBS, Taiwanese film director; three-time Academy Award winner; two-time Golden Lion winner; Tisch '83
Alan Menken, American composer, songwriter, and record producer; one of only sixteen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony; Steinhart '71
Suzanne Collins, American television writer and author; Author of The New York Times best-selling series The Underland Chronicles and The Hunger Games trilogy; Tisch '89
Alec Baldwin, American actor, writer, comedian and philanthropist; three-time Emmy Award winner; three-time Golden Globe winner; Tisch '94
Lady Gaga, American singer, songwriter, and actress; nine-time Grammy Award winner; thirteen-time MTV Video Music Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Angelina Jolie, American actress and humanitarian; three-time Golden Globe Award winner; Special Envoy to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; Tisch (non-degree seeking)
Mahershala Ali, American actor; two-time Academy Award winner; Golden Globe Award winner; three-time Screen Actors Guild Award winner; Tisch '00
Woody Allen, American director, actor and comedian; four-time Academy Award winner; nine-time BAFTA Award winner; Tisch (dropped out)
Adam Sandler, American actor, director and comedian; five-time MTV Movie & TV Award winner; eight-time People's Choice Award winner; Tisch '88
Donald Glover, American actor, comedian, screenwriter, and singer; two-time Golden Globe Award winner; five-time Grammy Award winner; Tisch '06
Anne Hathaway, American actress; Academy Award and Golden Globe Award winner; Gallatin (dropped out)
Tom Ford, American fashion designer and filmmaker; former creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent; CAS (dropped out)

The university moved in 1833 and has maintained its main campus in Greenwich Village surrounding Washington Square Park.

Waverly Place as the northern boundary of Washington Square Park

Waverly Place

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Narrow street in the Greenwich Village section of the New York City borough of Manhattan, that runs from Bank Street to Broadway.

Narrow street in the Greenwich Village section of the New York City borough of Manhattan, that runs from Bank Street to Broadway.

Waverly Place as the northern boundary of Washington Square Park

The two blocks which form the northern border of Washington Square Park – from MacDougal Street to Fifth Avenue, and from Fifth Avenue to University Place – are called Washington Square North.

Looking northward from the Metropolitan Museum of Art at 81st Street

Fifth Avenue

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Major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.

Major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.

Looking northward from the Metropolitan Museum of Art at 81st Street
Robert L. Bracklow (1849–1919), from his Glimpses through the Camera series, Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street, New York, USA, September 1, 1888, albumen print cabinet card, Department of Image Collections, National Gallery of Art Library, Washington, DC
Fifth Avenue after a snow storm in 1905
Members of Naval Reserve Center Bronx's color guard march up Fifth Avenue at the 244th Annual NYC St. Patrick's Day parade
1026–1028 Fifth Avenue, one of the few extant mansions on Millionaire's Row
The Museum Mile street sign
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Fifth Avenue looking north from 51st Street. This section of the street contains numerous boutiques and flagship stores.
Bird's-eye view looking north from 51st St. c. 1893
Street view looking north from 51st St. c. 1895
The same shot in March 2015
Christmas on Fifth Avenue in 1896
Fifth Avenue, 1918
Fifth Avenue begins at the Washington Square Arch in Washington Square Park
Memorial to New York architect Richard Morris Hunt, Fifth Avenue between 70th and 71st Streets
The Plaza Hotel, c.1907

It stretches north from Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village to West 143rd Street in Harlem.

The south face of the arch

Washington Square Arch

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The south face of the arch
The north face of the Washington Square Arch
South face of the Washington Arch at night
George Washington as Commander-in-Chief (1914–1916) by Hermon A. MacNeil
George Washington as President (1917–1918) by Alexander Stirling Calder

The Washington Square Arch, officially the Washington Arch, is a marble memorial arch in Washington Square Park, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City.

Lower Manhattan

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Southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City, which is the most populated city in the United States with over 8.8 million residents as of the 2020 census.

Southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City, which is the most populated city in the United States with over 8.8 million residents as of the 2020 census.

The pre-9/11 Lower Manhattan skyline in May 2001, seen from the Empire State Building. The skyline was dominated by The Twin Towers.
New Amsterdam, centered in the eventual Lower Manhattan, in 1664, the year England took control and renamed it "New York".
The Cooper Union at Astor Place, where Abraham Lincoln gave his famed Cooper Union speech, is one of the area's most storied buildings.
Photo of Lower Manhattan pictured in 1931
Peter Stuyvesant
View of New York harbor, ca. 1770
Norman Friend. Sidney's Map Twelve Miles Around New York, 1849. Chromo lithograph, Brooklyn Museum
View from the Woolworth Building in 1913
View from an airplane in 1981
The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, a designated U.S. National Historic Landmark and National Monument, as the site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots and the cradle of the modern gay rights movement.
United Airlines Flight 175 hits the South Tower of the original World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
Picture of Lower Manhattan skyline, including the One World Trade Center; taken from Little Island at Pier 55 in November 2021
Chinatown is home to the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere.
The park and surrounding neighborhood of Union Square, located between 14th and 17th Streets, may be considered a part of either Lower or Midtown Manhattan.
The New York Stock Exchange, by a significant margin the world's largest stock exchange per market capitalization of its listed companies, at US$23.1 trillion as of April 2018. Pictured is the exchange's building on Wall Street.
New York City Hall in Lower Manhattan's Civic Center neighborhood
Chinatown is home to the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere.

During the mid 1600s, farms of free blacks covered 130 acres where Washington Square Park later developed.

A map showing major greenspaces in New York City: 1) Central Park, 2) Van Cortlandt Park, 3) Bronx Park, 4) Pelham Bay Park, 5) Flushing Meadows Park, 6) Forest Park, 7) Prospect Park, 8) Floyd Bennett Field, 9) Jamaica Bay, A) Jacob Riis Park and Fort Tilden, B) Fort Wadsworth, C) Miller Field, D) Great Kills Park

List of New York City parks

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List of New York City parks.

List of New York City parks.

A map showing major greenspaces in New York City: 1) Central Park, 2) Van Cortlandt Park, 3) Bronx Park, 4) Pelham Bay Park, 5) Flushing Meadows Park, 6) Forest Park, 7) Prospect Park, 8) Floyd Bennett Field, 9) Jamaica Bay, A) Jacob Riis Park and Fort Tilden, B) Fort Wadsworth, C) Miller Field, D) Great Kills Park
Central Park is one of the most visited urban parks in the United States.
A pigeon at Bryant Park
Joyce Kilmer Park
St Mary's Park
Calvert Vaux Park
Continental Army Plaza
Dreier-Offerman Park
Seaside - Asser Levy park
Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza
Columbus Park
Tribeca Park
Captain Tilly Park
Rufus King Park
Buono Beach

There are also many smaller but historically significant parks in New York City, such as Battery Park, Bryant Park, Madison Square Park, Union Square Park, and Washington Square Park.

The east side of MacDougal Street below Minetta Lane (2015)

MacDougal Street

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One-way street in the Greenwich Village and SoHo neighborhoods of Manhattan, New York City.

One-way street in the Greenwich Village and SoHo neighborhoods of Manhattan, New York City.

The east side of MacDougal Street below Minetta Lane (2015)
Nos. 82–96, part of the MacDougal–Sullivan Gardens Historic District
No. 115, The Players Theatre and Cafe Wha? in 2015
No.127–131 are New York City landmarks

Between Waverly Place and West 3rd Street it carries the name Washington Square West and the numbering scheme changes, running north to south, beginning with #29 Washington Square West at Waverly Place and ending at #37 at West 3rd Street.

West 4th Street at Jane Street

4th Street (Manhattan)

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Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

West 4th Street at Jane Street
Due to the layout of streets in Greenwich Village, West 4th Street, running south to north, intersects West 12th Street, which runs west to east

The section of four short blocks from MacDougal Street to University Place which forms the southern border of Washington Square Park is called Washington Square South.