Waterloo Campaign: Ligny through Wavre to Waterloo

withdrawn parallel to Wellington
After their defeat at the Battle of Ligny (16 June 1815) the Prussians successfully disengaged and withdrew to north to Wavre where they reorganised and then three corps advanced westward to attack the right flank of the French army at the Battle of Waterloo.wikipedia
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Battle of Waterloo

Waterloobattlethe Battle of Waterloo
After their defeat at the Battle of Ligny (16 June 1815) the Prussians successfully disengaged and withdrew to north to Wavre where they reorganised and then three corps advanced westward to attack the right flank of the French army at the Battle of Waterloo.
Napoleon sent a third of his forces to pursue the Prussians, who had withdrawn parallel to Wellington in good order.

Battle of Ligny

LignyBattles of LignyBattle of Fleurus
After their defeat at the Battle of Ligny (16 June 1815) the Prussians successfully disengaged and withdrew to north to Wavre where they reorganised and then three corps advanced westward to attack the right flank of the French army at the Battle of Waterloo.

Napoleon

Napoleon BonaparteNapoleon INapoleonic
Napoleon wasted the morning of 17 June by taking a late breakfast and going to see the previous day's battlefield before organising a pursuit of the two Coalition armies.

Michel Ney

Marshal NeyNeyMarshall Ney
He took the reserves and marched with Marshal Ney in pursuit of the Duke of Wellington's Anglo-allied army, and he gave instructions to Marshal Grouchy to pursue the Prussians wherever they were going and harry them so that they had no time to reorganise.

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington

Duke of WellingtonWellingtonArthur Wellesley
He took the reserves and marched with Marshal Ney in pursuit of the Duke of Wellington's Anglo-allied army, and he gave instructions to Marshal Grouchy to pursue the Prussians wherever they were going and harry them so that they had no time to reorganise.

Emmanuel de Grouchy, marquis de Grouchy

GrouchyEmmanuel GrouchyMarshal Grouchy
He took the reserves and marched with Marshal Ney in pursuit of the Duke of Wellington's Anglo-allied army, and he gave instructions to Marshal Grouchy to pursue the Prussians wherever they were going and harry them so that they had no time to reorganise.

Namur

city of NamurMarche-les-DamesFlawinne
Both Napoleon and Grouchy assumed that the Prussians were retreating towards Namur and Liege, with a view to occupy the line of the river Meuse, and so during 17 June Grouchy sent the bulk of his cavalry ranging in that direction as far as Perwez.

Liège

LiegeLiège, BelgiumLüttich
Both Napoleon and Grouchy assumed that the Prussians were retreating towards Namur and Liege, with a view to occupy the line of the river Meuse, and so during 17 June Grouchy sent the bulk of his cavalry ranging in that direction as far as Perwez.

Meuse

MaasMeuse RiverRiver Meuse
Both Napoleon and Grouchy assumed that the Prussians were retreating towards Namur and Liege, with a view to occupy the line of the river Meuse, and so during 17 June Grouchy sent the bulk of his cavalry ranging in that direction as far as Perwez.

Perwez

Both Napoleon and Grouchy assumed that the Prussians were retreating towards Namur and Liege, with a view to occupy the line of the river Meuse, and so during 17 June Grouchy sent the bulk of his cavalry ranging in that direction as far as Perwez.

Johann von Thielmann

ThielemannThielmannvon Thielmann
Grouchy arrived at Wavre at around 16:00 and immediately engaged the Prussian III Corps (Thielemann's), which was acting as the rearguard of the Prussian army and which had been about to leave for Waterloo) in what became the Battle of Wavre. This decision was communicated in the orders then transmitted from the Prussian headquarters to Zieten and Pirch I directing them to bivouac at Bierge and Saint-Anne, in the vicinity of Wavre; as also in the orders forwarded, on the next morning, to the bivouacs of the III and IV corps(Thielemann's and Bülow), at Gembloux and, directing them to fall back, and bivouac at, and near Wavre.

Battle of Wavre

Wavre
Grouchy arrived at Wavre at around 16:00 and immediately engaged the Prussian III Corps (Thielemann's), which was acting as the rearguard of the Prussian army and which had been about to leave for Waterloo) in what became the Battle of Wavre.

Hans Ernst Karl, Graf von Zieten

ZietenGraf von Zietenvon Zieten
It was not until the night of 16 June, after Prussian I Corps (Zieten's) and the II Corps (Pirch I's) had retired to Tilly and Gentinnes, that it was decided the Prussian Army should retreat upon Wavre.

Georg Dubislav Ludwig von Pirch

Pirch IGeorg Dubislav von PirchPirch
It was not until the night of 16 June, after Prussian I Corps (Zieten's) and the II Corps (Pirch I's) had retired to Tilly and Gentinnes, that it was decided the Prussian Army should retreat upon Wavre.

Tilly, Villers-la-Ville

TillyCastle Tilly
It was not until the night of 16 June, after Prussian I Corps (Zieten's) and the II Corps (Pirch I's) had retired to Tilly and Gentinnes, that it was decided the Prussian Army should retreat upon Wavre.

Gentinnes

It was not until the night of 16 June, after Prussian I Corps (Zieten's) and the II Corps (Pirch I's) had retired to Tilly and Gentinnes, that it was decided the Prussian Army should retreat upon Wavre.

Wavre

BiergesGastucheWaver
It was not until the night of 16 June, after Prussian I Corps (Zieten's) and the II Corps (Pirch I's) had retired to Tilly and Gentinnes, that it was decided the Prussian Army should retreat upon Wavre.

Bierge

This decision was communicated in the orders then transmitted from the Prussian headquarters to Zieten and Pirch I directing them to bivouac at Bierge and Saint-Anne, in the vicinity of Wavre; as also in the orders forwarded, on the next morning, to the bivouacs of the III and IV corps(Thielemann's and Bülow), at Gembloux and, directing them to fall back, and bivouac at, and near Wavre.

Friedrich Wilhelm Freiherr von Bülow

BülowFriedrich Wilhelm von BülowBülow von Dennewitz
This decision was communicated in the orders then transmitted from the Prussian headquarters to Zieten and Pirch I directing them to bivouac at Bierge and Saint-Anne, in the vicinity of Wavre; as also in the orders forwarded, on the next morning, to the bivouacs of the III and IV corps(Thielemann's and Bülow), at Gembloux and, directing them to fall back, and bivouac at, and near Wavre.

Gembloux

Gembloux Gap
This decision was communicated in the orders then transmitted from the Prussian headquarters to Zieten and Pirch I directing them to bivouac at Bierge and Saint-Anne, in the vicinity of Wavre; as also in the orders forwarded, on the next morning, to the bivouacs of the III and IV corps(Thielemann's and Bülow), at Gembloux and, directing them to fall back, and bivouac at, and near Wavre. With the first glimmering of daylight the troops, which, under the command of General Jagow, had continued in full possession of Brye and its immediate vicinity during the night, began to retire, firstly, in the direction of Sombreffe, and thence to Gembloux, which they reached before the arrival of III Corps (Thielemann's). After the receipt of the order pointing out the direction of the retreat, Jagow conducted these troops, in the course of 17 June, towards their respective brigades.

Mont-Saint-Guibert

Ziten's and Pirch I's corps retired by Mont-Saint-Guibert, in rear of which defile the latter corps remained a considerable time as the rearguard, while the former marched on to Wavre, where it arrived about midday, crossed the Dyle, and took up its position at Bierge.

Defile (geography)

defiledefiles
Ziten's and Pirch I's corps retired by Mont-Saint-Guibert, in rear of which defile the latter corps remained a considerable time as the rearguard, while the former marched on to Wavre, where it arrived about midday, crossed the Dyle, and took up its position at Bierge.

Dyle (river)

DyleRiver DyleDyle River
Ziten's and Pirch I's corps retired by Mont-Saint-Guibert, in rear of which defile the latter corps remained a considerable time as the rearguard, while the former marched on to Wavre, where it arrived about midday, crossed the Dyle, and took up its position at Bierge.

Friedrich Wilhelm von Jagow

Jagowvon Jagow
With the first glimmering of daylight the troops, which, under the command of General Jagow, had continued in full possession of Brye and its immediate vicinity during the night, began to retire, firstly, in the direction of Sombreffe, and thence to Gembloux, which they reached before the arrival of III Corps (Thielemann's). After the receipt of the order pointing out the direction of the retreat, Jagow conducted these troops, in the course of 17 June, towards their respective brigades.

Sombreffe

With the first glimmering of daylight the troops, which, under the command of General Jagow, had continued in full possession of Brye and its immediate vicinity during the night, began to retire, firstly, in the direction of Sombreffe, and thence to Gembloux, which they reached before the arrival of III Corps (Thielemann's). After the receipt of the order pointing out the direction of the retreat, Jagow conducted these troops, in the course of 17 June, towards their respective brigades.