A report on Watertown, Massachusetts

Saltonstall's landing spot in Watertown, also known as Elbridge Gerry Landing
Edmund Fowle House, built in the 1700s and used by the Massachusetts government during the Revolutionary War
Browne House, built c. 1694
St. Stephen Armenian Apostolic Church
Hairenik Association building – Watertown, Mass.
Benjamin Robbins Curtis
Eliza Dushku

City in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and is part of Greater Boston.

- Watertown, Massachusetts

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Hairenik Association building - Watertown, Mass.

Hairenik

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Hairenik Association building - Watertown, Mass.

Hairenik (Հայրենիք meaning "fatherland") is an Armenian language weekly newspaper published by the Hairenik Association in Watertown, Massachusetts in the United States.

Athenahealth

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Private American company that provides network-enabled services for healthcare and point-of-care mobile apps in the United States.

Private American company that provides network-enabled services for healthcare and point-of-care mobile apps in the United States.

The company was founded in 1997 in San Diego and is now headquartered in Watertown, Massachusetts.

Depiction of the Battle of Lexington by William Barnes Wollen, 1910

Battles of Lexington and Concord

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The Battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War.

The Battles of Lexington and Concord were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War.

Depiction of the Battle of Lexington by William Barnes Wollen, 1910
Thomas Gage
Francis Smith, commander of the military expedition, in a 1763 portrait
A March 24, 1775 resolution of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, signed by John Hancock, calls for the colony to be put into "a complete state of defense".
Margaret Kemble Gage may have given military intelligence to the rebels.
Silversmith Paul Revere and several other messengers on horseback sounded the alarm that the regulars were leaving Boston.
1775 map of the battles and of the siege of Boston
BEP engraved vignette Battle of Lexington which appeared on the [[:File:US-NBN-MT-Butte-2566-1875-20-4943-A.jpg|$20 National Bank Note]]
Battle of Lexington, April 19, 1775, New York Public Library
The first of four engravings by Amos Doolittle from 1775. Doolittle visited the battle sites and interviewed soldiers and witnesses. Contains controversial elements, possibly inaccuracies. Fire from the militia may have occurred but is not depicted.
The second of four engravings by Amos Doolittle from 1775, depicting the British entering Concord
The reconstructed North Bridge in Minute Man National Historical Park, Concord
The third of four engravings by Amos Doolittle from 1775, depicting the engagement at the North Bridge
"The Minute Man" by Daniel Chester French at the North Bridge was meant to represent the typical provincial but was also inspired in large part by the story of Capt. Isaac Davis of Acton who died where the statue now stands. It is inscribed with verse from Emerson's "Concord Hymn".
A National Park Service map showing the retreat from Concord and Percy's rescue
This statue is known as The Lexington Minuteman is commonly believed to depict Captain John Parker. It is by Henry Hudson Kitson and stands at the town green of Lexington, Massachusetts.
The fourth of four engravings by Amos Doolittle from 1775, showing Percy's rescue in Lexington
Percy's return to Charlestown (detail from 1775 map of the battle)
The Jason Russell House in Arlington
The siege of Boston 1775–1776
Gravemarkers along Battle Road in Lexington are maintained with Britain's 1775 version of the Union Flag.
Daniel Chester French's The Minute Man, 1874
1970 Franklin Mint medallion commemorating Lexington and Concord 1775
A citizen of Acton and Members of the Acton Fife and Drum Corps march to Concord on the Isaac Davis Trail during the 2016 annual Patriots' Day celebration.

After a large contingent of regulars alarmed the countryside by an expedition from Boston to Watertown on March 30, The Pennsylvania Journal, a newspaper in Philadelphia, reported, "It was supposed they were going to Concord, where the Provincial Congress is now sitting. A quantity of provisions and warlike stores are lodged there. ... It is ... said they are intending to go out again soon. "

Approaching the former West Stockbridge toll plaza traveling eastbound, January 2008

Massachusetts Turnpike

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Toll highway in the U.S. state of Massachusetts that is maintained by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT).

Toll highway in the U.S. state of Massachusetts that is maintained by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT).

Approaching the former West Stockbridge toll plaza traveling eastbound, January 2008
The "Weston tolls" that separated the Western Turnpike from the Boston Extension, October 2006
The eastern terminus of the turnpike in the state, and I-90 nationally, at Route 1A in Boston
Now-demolished toll plaza on an exit ramp, January 2016
Toll ticket used prior to conversion to open road tolling
Fare collection gantry in Newton
A map of the proposed highway put forth in the 1948 Massachusetts Highway Master Plan. These proposed roadways would become some of the state's most important transportation routes in the eastern portion of the state.
Billboard advertising the construction of the Turnpike, c. 1956
New York Central Railroad (Boston and Albany parent company) employee magazine Headlights from February 1965 showing an aerial photograph of the completed Boston Extension of the Massachusetts Turnpike
Diagram of the highway system in downtown Boston before and after completion of the Big Dig
Boston traffic crawling over the closed Ted Williams Tunnel entrance during rush hour, one day after the ceiling collapse
Star Market (briefly Shaw's Supermarket) was built over the turnpike in Newtonville
The Massachusetts Turnpike near the Chicopee exit
Ludlow Service Plaza westbound
Lee Service Plaza eastbound

Complicating the matter, Callahan's planned extension route was not universally accepted by others within the state, such as newly elected Governor John A. Volpe and Newton Mayor Donald Gibbs, who sought to construct a freeway that would follow a different route between the Borders of Newton, Waltham and Watertown along the Charles River and U.S. Route 20 and be constructed using the funds now being provided by the Federal Highway Administration.

Arsenal Mall interior, 2012

Arsenal Yards

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Arsenal Mall interior, 2012

Arsenal Yards (formerly known as Arsenal Mall from 1983 to 2013 and the Arsenal Project from 2013 to 2016) is a mixed-use, smart growth development in Watertown, Massachusetts.

Watertown Yard

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A PCC streetcar (left) and a work car in Watertown Yard in 1967
Watertown Carhouse in 2021

Watertown Carhouse is a bus maintenance facility and former streetcar carhouse located in the southern section of Watertown, Massachusetts, across the Charles River from Watertown Square.

The Armenian Mirror-Spectator

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The Armenian Mirror-Spectator is a newspaper published by the Baikar Association, in Watertown, Massachusetts.

Watertown Square station

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Watertown Square is the main square of Watertown, Massachusetts, located at the confluence of North Beacon Street and Main Street (US-20), Mt. Auburn Street (MA-16), Pleasant Street, Arsenal Street, and Charles River Road.

NESN

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American regional sports cable and satellite television network owned by a joint venture of Fenway Sports Group and Delaware North (which owns the remaining 20% interest in the network, and owns the TD Garden, home of the Boston Bruins, which it also owns, and the Boston Celtics.

American regional sports cable and satellite television network owned by a joint venture of Fenway Sports Group and Delaware North (which owns the remaining 20% interest in the network, and owns the TD Garden, home of the Boston Bruins, which it also owns, and the Boston Celtics.

NESN's logo from 1990 to 2019.
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150px

Headquartered in Watertown, Massachusetts, the network is primarily carried on cable providers throughout New England (except in Fairfield County, Connecticut, which is part of the greater New York City media market).

A former trolleybus on the #71 route leaves the Harvard bus tunnel

Trolleybuses in Greater Boston

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The Boston-area trolleybus (or, as known locally, trackless trolley) system forms part of the public transportation network serving Greater Boston in the U.S. state of Massachusetts.

The Boston-area trolleybus (or, as known locally, trackless trolley) system forms part of the public transportation network serving Greater Boston in the U.S. state of Massachusetts.

A former trolleybus on the #71 route leaves the Harvard bus tunnel
Pullman-Standard trolleybuses at North Cambridge Carhouse in 1967
A Flyer trolleybus in the upper level of the Harvard bus tunnel in 2003
1976 Flyer E800 trolleybus at Cambridge Common, followed by the newer Neoplan AN-440LF trolleybus
The #71 route terminates at Watertown Square
Dual-mode bus in electric mode at the top of the Silver Line tunnel ramp
A Silver Line dual-mode bus changes from electric to diesel mode at Silver Line Way

Before the Cambridge system's closure on March 12, 2022, four other routes fanned out from the Harvard bus tunnel at Harvard Square station, running through Cambridge, Belmont, and Watertown.