Wealth

Savingsaffluentwealthyaffluencerichfortunematerial wealthopulencerichesWealth (economics)
Wealth is the abundance of valuable financial assets or physical possessions which can be converted into a form that can be used for transactions.wikipedia
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Economics

economiceconomisteconomic theory
The modern concept of wealth is of significance in all areas of economics, and clearly so for growth economics and development economics, yet the meaning of wealth is context-dependent.
Jean-Baptiste Say (1803), distinguishing the subject from its public-policy uses, defines it as the science of production, distribution, and consumption of wealth.

Property

propertiesproprietarypatrimony
Wealth is the abundance of valuable financial assets or physical possessions which can be converted into a form that can be used for transactions.
Capitalism has as a central assumption that property rights encourage their holders to develop the property, generate wealth, and efficiently allocate resources based on the operation of markets.

Wealth effect

In macroeconomic theory the 'wealth effect' may refer to the increase in aggregate consumption from an increase in national wealth.
The wealth effect is the change in spending that accompanies a change in perceived wealth.

List of countries by total wealth

National wealth31% of the total wealth in the worldglobal net wealth
In macroeconomic theory the 'wealth effect' may refer to the increase in aggregate consumption from an increase in national wealth.
It refers to the total value of net wealth possessed by the citizens of a nation at a set point in time.

Wealth elasticity of demand

One feature of its effect on economic behavior is the wealth elasticity of demand, which is the percentage change in the amount of consumption goods demanded for each one-percent change in wealth.
The wealth elasticity of demand, in microeconomics and macroeconomics, is the proportional change in the consumption of a good relative to a change in consumers' wealth (as distinct from changes in personal income).

Ethics

ethicalmoral philosophyethic
Defining wealth can be a normative process with various ethical implications, since often wealth maximization is seen as a goal or is thought to be a normative principle of its own.
All other things, such as civic life or wealth, were only made worthwhile and of benefit when employed in the practice of the virtues.

Stock and flow

stockflowflow variable
Wealth or savings is a stock variable – that is, it is measurable at a date in time, for example the value of an orchard on December 31 minus debt owed on the orchard. For a given amount of wealth, say at the beginning of the year, income from that wealth, as measurable over say a year is a flow variable.
A person or country might have stocks of money, financial assets, liabilities, wealth, real means of production, capital, inventories, and human capital (or labor power).

Capital (economics)

capitalcapital flowsinvestment capital
The assets include those that are tangible (land and capital) and financial (money, bonds, etc.).
For Marx capital only exists within the process of the economic circuit (represented by M-C-M') —it is wealth that grows out of the process of circulation itself, and for Marx it formed the basis of the economic system of capitalism.

Income

incomesearningsearning power
For a given amount of wealth, say at the beginning of the year, income from that wealth, as measurable over say a year is a flow variable.
The theoretical generalization to more than one period is a multi-period wealth and income constraint.

Wealth inequality in the United States

wealth inequalityblack povertyfairness issues regarding wealth-distribution
According to Richard H Ropers, the concentration of wealth in the United States is inequitably distributed.
Wealth includes the values of homes, automobiles, personal valuables, businesses, savings, and investments.

National accounts

national accountingnational accountGovernment accounting
But analysis may adapt typical accounting conventions for economic purposes in social accounting (such as in national accounts).
As to stocks, the 'capital accounts' are a balance-sheet approach that has assets on one side (including values of land, the capital stock, and financial assets) and liabilities and net worth on the other, measured as of the end of the accounting period.

Middle class

middle-classmiddlemiddle classes
The middle class views wealth as something for emergencies and it is seen as more of a cushion.

Socioeconomic status

socio-economic statussocioeconomicSES
Social class is not identical to wealth, but the two concepts are related (particularly in Marxist theory), leading to the combined concept of socioeconomic status.
Families with higher and expendable income can accumulate wealth and focus on meeting immediate needs while being able to consume and enjoy luxuries and weather crises.

Agrarian society

agrarianagrarian economyagrarian societies
Additionally, in developed countries post-agrarian society (industrial society) this argument has many critics (including those influenced by Georgist and geolibertarian ideas) who argue that since land, by definition, is not a product of human labor, any claim of private property in it is a form of theft; as David Lloyd George observed, "to prove a legal title to land one must trace it back to the man who stole it."
In an agrarian society, cultivating the land is the primary source of wealth.

Generational accounting

generational economics
An example of the latter is generational accounting of social security systems to include the present value projected future outlays considered to be liabilities.

Social class

classsocial classesclasses
Social class is not identical to wealth, but the two concepts are related (particularly in Marxist theory), leading to the combined concept of socioeconomic status.
Distinctions of wealth, income, education, culture or social network might arise and would only be determined by individual experience and achievement in such a society.

Post-scarcity economy

post-scarcityabundancetechnological optimism
Wealth is the abundance of valuable financial assets or physical possessions which can be converted into a form that can be used for transactions.

Value (economics)

valueeconomic valuemonetary value
Wealth is the abundance of valuable financial assets or physical possessions which can be converted into a form that can be used for transactions.

Financial asset

financial assetsassetassets
Wealth is the abundance of valuable financial assets or physical possessions which can be converted into a form that can be used for transactions.

Financial transaction

transactiontransactionsfinancial transactions
Wealth is the abundance of valuable financial assets or physical possessions which can be converted into a form that can be used for transactions.

Indo-European languages

Indo-EuropeanIndo-European languageIndo-European language family
This includes the core meaning as held in the originating old English word weal, which is from an Indo-European word stem.

Economic growth

growthGDP growthgrowth rate
The modern concept of wealth is of significance in all areas of economics, and clearly so for growth economics and development economics, yet the meaning of wealth is context-dependent.

Development economics

development economistdevelopmentdevelopmental economics
The modern concept of wealth is of significance in all areas of economics, and clearly so for growth economics and development economics, yet the meaning of wealth is context-dependent.

Normative

normative theorynormativityinformative
Defining wealth can be a normative process with various ethical implications, since often wealth maximization is seen as a goal or is thought to be a normative principle of its own.

Macroeconomics

macroeconomicmacroeconomistmacroeconomic policy
In macroeconomic theory the 'wealth effect' may refer to the increase in aggregate consumption from an increase in national wealth.