Web 2.0

2.0enterprise 2.02.0 webdynamic websitesmultimediaParticipative (or participatory) Websocial media boomthe multitudes of other websites featuring user contributionwebWeb 1.0
Web 2.0, otherwise known as Participative (or Participatory) and Social Web, refers to World Wide Web websites that emphasize user-generated content, usability (ease of use, even by non-experts), participatory culture and interoperability (this means that a website can work well with other products, systems, and devices) for end users.wikipedia
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User-generated content

user-generateduser generated contentUGC
Web 2.0, otherwise known as Participative (or Participatory) and Social Web, refers to World Wide Web websites that emphasize user-generated content, usability (ease of use, even by non-experts), participatory culture and interoperability (this means that a website can work well with other products, systems, and devices) for end users. A Web 2.0 website allows users to interact and collaborate with each other through social media dialogue as creators of user-generated content in a virtual community. This contrasts the first generation of Web 1.0-era websites where people were limited to viewing content in a passive manner.
Conversational or two-way media is a key characteristic of so-called Web 2.0 which encourages the publishing of one's own content and commenting on other people's content.

Tim O'Reilly

Tim O’Reilly
The term was invented by Darcy DiNucci in 1999 and popularized several years later by Tim O'Reilly and Dale Dougherty at the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 Conference in late 2004.
He popularised the terms open source and Web 2.0.

Web 2.0 Summit

Web 2.0 ConferenceWeb 2.0Web 2.0 Expo
The term was invented by Darcy DiNucci in 1999 and popularized several years later by Tim O'Reilly and Dale Dougherty at the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 Conference in late 2004.
The event was started by Tim O'Reilly, who is also widely credited with popularizing the term "Web 2.0".

Participatory culture

Participatory culture and technologyparticipationparticipatory
Web 2.0, otherwise known as Participative (or Participatory) and Social Web, refers to World Wide Web websites that emphasize user-generated content, usability (ease of use, even by non-experts), participatory culture and interoperability (this means that a website can work well with other products, systems, and devices) for end users.
This new culture as it relates to the Internet has been described as Web 2.0.

World Wide Web

Webthe webweb-based
Web 2.0, otherwise known as Participative (or Participatory) and Social Web, refers to World Wide Web websites that emphasize user-generated content, usability (ease of use, even by non-experts), participatory culture and interoperability (this means that a website can work well with other products, systems, and devices) for end users.
While the read-only goal was met, accessible authorship of web content took longer to mature, with the wiki concept, WebDAV, blogs, Web 2.0 and RSS/Atom.

Social media

socialsocial media campaignsocial media platform
A Web 2.0 website allows users to interact and collaborate with each other through social media dialogue as creators of user-generated content in a virtual community. This contrasts the first generation of Web 1.0-era websites where people were limited to viewing content in a passive manner. Examples of Web 2.0 features include social networking sites or social media sites (e.g., Facebook), blogs, wikis, folksonomies ("tagging" keywords on websites and links), video sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), hosted services, Web applications ("apps"), collaborative consumption platforms, and mashup applications.
1) Social media are interactive Web 2.0 Internet-based applications.

Collaborative consumption

online platformonline content platformonline platforms
Examples of Web 2.0 features include social networking sites or social media sites (e.g., Facebook), blogs, wikis, folksonomies ("tagging" keywords on websites and links), video sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), hosted services, Web applications ("apps"), collaborative consumption platforms, and mashup applications.
It has regained a new impetus through information technology, especially Web 2.0, mobile technology and social media.

Mashup (web application hybrid)

mashupmashupsmash-up
Examples of Web 2.0 features include social networking sites or social media sites (e.g., Facebook), blogs, wikis, folksonomies ("tagging" keywords on websites and links), video sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), hosted services, Web applications ("apps"), collaborative consumption platforms, and mashup applications.
Mashups can be considered to have an active role in the evolution of social software and Web 2.0.

Virtual community

virtual communitiesonline communitiesonline community
A Web 2.0 website allows users to interact and collaborate with each other through social media dialogue as creators of user-generated content in a virtual community. This contrasts the first generation of Web 1.0-era websites where people were limited to viewing content in a passive manner.
Virtual communities may synthesize Web 2.0 technologies with the community, and therefore have been described as Community 2.0, although strong community bonds have been forged online since the early 1970s on timeshare systems like PLATO and later on Usenet.

End user

end-userend-usersend users
Web 2.0, otherwise known as Participative (or Participatory) and Social Web, refers to World Wide Web websites that emphasize user-generated content, usability (ease of use, even by non-experts), participatory culture and interoperability (this means that a website can work well with other products, systems, and devices) for end users.
Libraries have had to undergo many changes in order to cope, including training existing librarians in Web 2.0 and database skills and hiring IT and software experts.

Website

web sitewebsitesonline
Web 2.0, otherwise known as Participative (or Participatory) and Social Web, refers to World Wide Web websites that emphasize user-generated content, usability (ease of use, even by non-experts), participatory culture and interoperability (this means that a website can work well with other products, systems, and devices) for end users.
Interactive sites are part of the Web 2.0 community of sites, and allow for interactivity between the site owner and site visitors or users.

Dale Dougherty

The term was invented by Darcy DiNucci in 1999 and popularized several years later by Tim O'Reilly and Dale Dougherty at the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 Conference in late 2004.
Dougherty helped popularize the term "Web 2.0" at the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 Conference in late 2004, though it was coined by Darcy DiNucci in 1999.

Personal web page

personal websitepersonal homepagePersonal
Personal web pages were common, consisting mainly of static pages hosted on ISP-run web servers, or on free web hosting services such as GeoCities.
With the rise of Web 2.0-style websites, both professional websites and user-created, amateur websites tended to contain interactive features, such as "clickable" links to online newspaper articles or favourite websites, the option to comment on content displayed on the website, the option to "tag" images, videos or links on the site, the option of "clicking" on an image to enlarge it or find out more information, the option of User participation for website guests to evaluate or review the pages, or even the option to create new user-generated content for others to see.

Social networking service

social networkingsocial network servicesocial networking site
Examples of Web 2.0 features include social networking sites or social media sites (e.g., Facebook), blogs, wikis, folksonomies ("tagging" keywords on websites and links), video sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), hosted services, Web applications ("apps"), collaborative consumption platforms, and mashup applications. Major features of Web 2.0 include social networking websites, self-publishing platforms (e.g., WordPress' easy-to-use blog and website creation tools), "tagging" (which enables users to label websites, videos or photos in some fashion), "like" buttons (which enable a user to indicate that they are pleased by online content), and social bookmarking.
social networking services are Web 2.0, Internet-based applications

Tag (metadata)

tagstagtagging
Major features of Web 2.0 include social networking websites, self-publishing platforms (e.g., WordPress' easy-to-use blog and website creation tools), "tagging" (which enables users to label websites, videos or photos in some fashion), "like" buttons (which enable a user to indicate that they are pleased by online content), and social bookmarking.
Tagging was popularized by websites associated with Web 2.0 and is an important feature of many Web 2.0 services.

You (Time Person of the Year)

YouPerson of the Year: You2006 ''TIME magazine'' Person of The Year
The popularity of Web 2.0 was acknowledged by 2006 TIME magazine Person of The Year (You). That is, TIME selected the masses of users who were participating in content creation on social networks, blogs, wikis, and media sharing sites.
The magazine set out to recognize the millions of people who anonymously contribute user-generated content to wikis and other websites such as Wikipedia, YouTube, MySpace, Facebook, and the multitudes of other websites featuring user contribution.

Blog

blogsbloggerweblog
Examples of Web 2.0 features include social networking sites or social media sites (e.g., Facebook), blogs, wikis, folksonomies ("tagging" keywords on websites and links), video sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), hosted services, Web applications ("apps"), collaborative consumption platforms, and mashup applications.
In the 2010s, the majority are interactive Web 2.0 websites, allowing visitors to leave online comments, and it is this interactivity that distinguishes them from other static websites.

O'Reilly Media

O'ReillyO'Reilly & AssociatesO'Reilly and Associates
The term was invented by Darcy DiNucci in 1999 and popularized several years later by Tim O'Reilly and Dale Dougherty at the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 Conference in late 2004.
To do this, Dale Dougherty and Tim O'Reilly decided to use the term "Web 2.0" coined in January 1999 by Darcy DiNucci.

HTML

HyperText Markup Language(X)HTML.html
The use of HTML 3.2-era elements such as frames and tables to position and align elements on a page. These were often used in combination with spacer GIFs.
Such agents are not commonplace even now, but some of the ideas of Web 2.0, mashups and price comparison websites may be coming close.

Semantic Web

semanticsemanticsDataweb
On the other hand, the term Semantic Web (sometimes referred to as Web 3.0) was coined by Berners-Lee to refer to a web of content where the meaning can be processed by machines.
Tim O'Reilly, who coined the term Web 2.0 proposed a long-term vision of the Semantic Web as a web of data, where sophisticated applications manipulate the data web.

YouTube

youtube.comYouTube channelYouTuber
Examples of Web 2.0 features include social networking sites or social media sites (e.g., Facebook), blogs, wikis, folksonomies ("tagging" keywords on websites and links), video sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), hosted services, Web applications ("apps"), collaborative consumption platforms, and mashup applications.
In 2006, Time praised Web 2.0 for enabling "community and collaboration on a scale never seen before", and added that YouTube "harnesses the stupidity of crowds as well as its wisdom. Some of the comments on YouTube make you weep for the future of humanity just for the spelling alone, never mind the obscenity and the naked hatred".

SLATES

Web 2.0 sites include the following features and techniques, referred to as the acronym SLATES by Andrew McAfee:
SLATES (Search, Links, Authorship, Tags, Extensions, Signalling) is an initialism that describes the business impacting capabilities, derived from the effective use of Web 2.0 technologies in and across enterprises.

Porn 2.0

porn site
Enterprise 2.0, PR 2.0, Classroom 2.0, Publishing 2.0, Medicine 2.0, Telco 2.0, Travel 2.0, Government 2.0, and even Porn 2.0.
Porn 2.0, named after "Web 2.0", refers to pornographic websites featuring user-generated content.

Enterprise social software

Enterprise Socialcommunication within organizationsEnterprise 2.0
Enterprise 2.0, PR 2.0, Classroom 2.0, Publishing 2.0, Medicine 2.0, Telco 2.0, Travel 2.0, Government 2.0, and even Porn 2.0.
Enterprise social software (also known as or regarded as a major component of Enterprise 2.0), comprises social software as used in "enterprise" (business/commercial) contexts.

JavaScript library

JavaScript librarieslibraryJavaScript frameworks
The client-side (Web browser) technologies used in Web 2.0 development include Ajax and JavaScript frameworks.
While JavaScript, as first developed by Netscape (and later Mozilla), has long had a presence on the Web for many websites, it gained a particular pitch with the rise of the Web 2.0 era of computing, in which JavaScript became increasingly used for the development of user interfaces for applications, both web-based and desktop-based.