Wells, Somerset

WellsCity of WellsWells, EnglandTydenton
Wells is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills.wikipedia
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Wells Cathedral

WellscathedralCathedral Church of Saint Andrew
Although the population recorded in the 2011 census was only 10,536, (increased to 12,000 by 2018) and with a built-up area of just 3.244 square kilometres, Wells has had city status since medieval times, because of the presence of Wells Cathedral. With the construction of the current cathedral and the bishop's palace in the first half of the 13th century, under the direction of Bishop Reginald and later Bishop Jocelin, a native of the city, Wells became the principal seat of the diocese.
Wells Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Wells, Somerset, England, dedicated to St Andrew the Apostle and seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells, whose throne or cathedra it holds as mother church of the diocese.

City status in the United Kingdom

city statuscitycathedral city
Wells is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills.
Some cities today are very small because they were granted city status in or before the 16th century, then were unaffected by population growth during the Industrial Revolution—notably Wells (population about 10,000) and St Davids (population about 2,000).

Bishop's Palace, Wells

Bishop's PalaceBishop's Palace in WellsBishop's Palace at Wells
Wells is named from three wells dedicated to Saint Andrew, one in the market place and two within the grounds of the Bishop's Palace and cathedral. With the construction of the current cathedral and the bishop's palace in the first half of the 13th century, under the direction of Bishop Reginald and later Bishop Jocelin, a native of the city, Wells became the principal seat of the diocese.
The Bishop's Palace and accompanying Bishops House at Wells in the English county of Somerset, is adjacent to Wells Cathedral and has been the home of the Bishops of the Diocese of Bath and Wells for 800 years.

Mendip District

MendipMendip District CouncilMendip Council
Wells is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills.
The district was formed on 1 April 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972, by a merger of the municipal boroughs of Glastonbury and Wells, along with Frome, Shepton Mallet, Street urban districts, and Frome Rural District, Shepton Mallet Rural District, Wells Rural District, part of Axbridge Rural District and part of Clutton Rural District.

The Blue School, Wells

The Blue School
The city has a variety of sporting and cultural activities and houses several schools including The Blue School, a state coeducational comprehensive school that was founded in 1641, and the independent Wells Cathedral School, that was founded possibly as early as 909 and is one of the five established musical schools for school-age children in the United Kingdom.
The Blue School is a coeducational, secondary school located in Wells, Somerset, England.

Wells Cathedral School

Cathedral SchoolCathedral School in Wells
The city has a variety of sporting and cultural activities and houses several schools including The Blue School, a state coeducational comprehensive school that was founded in 1641, and the independent Wells Cathedral School, that was founded possibly as early as 909 and is one of the five established musical schools for school-age children in the United Kingdom.
Wells Cathedral School is a co-educational independent school located in Wells, Somerset, England.

Civil parish

parishcivil parishesancient parish
Wells is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills. The civil parish of Wells was formed in 1933 upon the merger of Wells St Cuthbert In and Wells St Andrew (the latter being the historic liberty of the cathedral, the bishop's palace, etc., amounting to just 52 acre).
The most populous is Sutton Coldfield, and those with cathedral city status are Chichester, Ely, Hereford, Lichfield, Ripon, Salisbury, Truro and Wells.

Bishop of Bath and Wells

Bishop of WellsBath and WellsBishop of Bath
Two hundred years later, in 909, it became the seat of the newly formed bishopric of Wells; but in 1090, the bishop's seat was removed to Bath.
The Episcopal seat is located in the Cathedral Church of Saint Andrew in the city of Wells in Somerset.

Somerset

SomersetshireSomerset, EnglandCounty of Somerset
Wells is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills.
The county has two cities, Bath and Wells, and (including the county town of Taunton, which has no town council but instead is the chief settlement of the county's only extant borough).

Diocese of Bath and Wells

Bath and WellsBath & WellsWells
The move caused severe arguments between the canons of Wells and the monks of Bath until 1245 when the bishopric was renamed the Diocese of Bath and Wells, to be elected by both religious houses.
The Episcopal seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells is located in the Cathedral Church of Saint Andrew in the city of Wells in Somerset.

List of smallest cities in the United Kingdom

smallest cityeighth smallestsmallest cities
Often described as England's smallest city, it is actually second smallest to the City of London in area and population, but unlike London it is not part of a larger urban agglomeration.

Wookey

BleadneyHentonYarley
The 8th-century port at Bleadney on the River Axe enabled goods to be brought to within 3 mi of Wells.
Wookey is a village and civil parish 2 mi west of Wells, on the River Axe in the Mendip district of Somerset, England.

Bath, Somerset

BathBath, EnglandCity of Bath
Two hundred years later, in 909, it became the seat of the newly formed bishopric of Wells; but in 1090, the bishop's seat was removed to Bath.
William Rufus granted the town, abbey and mint to a royal physician, John of Tours, who became Bishop of Wells and Abbot of Bath, following the sacking of the town during the Rebellion of 1088.

Jocelin of Wells

Bishop JocelinBishop Jocelyn
With the construction of the current cathedral and the bishop's palace in the first half of the 13th century, under the direction of Bishop Reginald and later Bishop Jocelin, a native of the city, Wells became the principal seat of the diocese.
He was also active in his diocese, ordering construction on the cathedral at Wells, and issuing rules for his diocesan clergy.

Cheddar Valley line

Cheddar Valley RailwayStrawberry LineStrawberry Line railway walk
In 1870, the Cheddar Valley line branch of the Bristol and Exeter Railway from Yatton, reached Wells and built a third station at Tucker Street.
It was opened in parts: the first section connecting Shepton Mallet to Witham, later extended to Wells, was built by the East Somerset Railway from 1858.

Wells (Priory Road) railway station

Priory RoadWellsWells (Priory Road)
Wells first station, Priory Road, opened in 1859 on the Somerset Central Railway (later the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway) as the terminus of a short branch from Glastonbury.
Wells (Priory Road) was a railway station on the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway at Wells in the county of Somerset in England.

Bristol and Exeter Railway

Bristol & Exeter RailwayB&ERBER
In 1870, the Cheddar Valley line branch of the Bristol and Exeter Railway from Yatton, reached Wells and built a third station at Tucker Street.
It opened a number of branches within the general area it served: to Clevedon, Cheddar, Wells, Weston-super-Mare, Chard, Yeovil and Tiverton.

Wookey Hole

Wookey Hole villageWitch of Wookey Hole
Penleigh Camp on the Wookey Hole Road was a German working camp.
Wookey Hole is a village close to Wells in Somerset, England.

Wells East Somerset railway station

a station
A second railway, the East Somerset, opened a branch line from Witham in 1862 and built a station to the east of Priory Road.
Wells station in the Somerset city of Wells was the terminus of the East Somerset Railway line from Witham and opened when the line was extended from Shepton Mallet in 1862.

Wells Forum

Forest of MendipMendip
Wells was part of, and gave its name to, the hundred of Wells Forum.
The name Wells Forum was derived from the city of Wells, which lies within its limits, to which was added the word Forum, referring to Wells' market place.

Compton Bishop

RackleyCrossWebbington
In the Middle Ages overseas trade was carried out from the port of Rackley.
In the 14th century a French ship sailed up the river and by 1388 Thomas Tanner from Wells used Rackley to export cloth and corn to Portugal, and received iron and salt in exchange.

Yatton

ClaverhamClaverham, Somerset
In 1870, the Cheddar Valley line branch of the Bristol and Exeter Railway from Yatton, reached Wells and built a third station at Tucker Street.
Other branches followed, to Cheddar/Wells (1869)] and the Wrington Vale Light Railway (1901) to Blagdon from Congresbury.

East Somerset Railway

East SomersetWitham to Shepton Mallet and Wells
A second railway, the East Somerset, opened a branch line from Witham in 1862 and built a station to the east of Priory Road.
Four years later the line was extended to Wells; this part of the line was opened on 1 March 1862.

Witham (Somerset) railway station

Withamformer railway stationWitham (Somerset)
A second railway, the East Somerset, opened a branch line from Witham in 1862 and built a station to the east of Priory Road.
In 1858, the East Somerset Railway opened a branch line from Witham first to Shepton Mallet and then, in 1862, to Wells; in 1870, this line linked up to the Bristol and Exeter Railway branch from Yatton to Wells, the Cheddar Valley line, and through services began.

Wells St Cuthbert In

The civil parish of Wells was formed in 1933 upon the merger of Wells St Cuthbert In and Wells St Andrew (the latter being the historic liberty of the cathedral, the bishop's palace, etc., amounting to just 52 acre).
Wells St Cuthbert In, sometimes St Cuthbert In, was a civil parish covering the larger part of the small city of Wells, in Somerset, England.