Slavic tribes from the 7th to 9th centuries AD in Europe
The Limes Saxoniae border between the Saxons and the Lechites Obotrites, established about 810 in present-day Schleswig-Holstein
West Slav tribes in the 9th and 10th centuries
Germaniae veteris typus (Old Germany). Aestui, Venedi, Gythones and Ingaevones are visible on the right upper corner of the map. Edited by Willem and Joan Blaeu, 1645.
Reconstruction of the Slavic temple in Groß Raden
The interior of the original Lutheran Church the Wends established in Serbin, Texas, St. Paul.
West Slavic languages
This 1940 ethnic map by an Austrian scholar uses the term Windische for the population of Styria, in parallel to Slowenen elsewhere in Slovenia

In German-speaking Europe during the Middle Ages, the term "Wends" was interpreted as synonymous with "Slavs" and sporadically used in literature to refer to West Slavs and South Slavs living within the Holy Roman Empire.

- Wends

In the Middle Ages, the name "Wends" (derived from Roman-era Veneti) was applied to Western Slavic peoples.

- West Slavs
Slavic tribes from the 7th to 9th centuries AD in Europe

9 related topics

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The Capture of the Wends

Wendish Crusade

The Capture of the Wends
Henry's duchies Saxony and Bavaria

The Wendish Crusade (Wendenkreuzzug) was a military campaign in 1147, one of the Northern Crusades and a part of the Second Crusade, led primarily by the Kingdom of Germany within the Holy Roman Empire and directed against the Polabian Slavs (or "Wends").

By the early 12th century, the German archbishoprics of Bremen and Magdeburg sought the conversion to Christianity of neighboring pagan West Slavs through peaceful means.

Map of West-Central Europe from 919 to 1125, by William R. Shepherd. The territory of the Polabian Slavs is outlined in purple near the top, with the Obotrite and Veleti groups in white and the Sorb groups colored purple.

Polabian Slavs

Map of West-Central Europe from 919 to 1125, by William R. Shepherd. The territory of the Polabian Slavs is outlined in purple near the top, with the Obotrite and Veleti groups in white and the Sorb groups colored purple.
Polabian Slavic Tribes, green is uninhabited forested area
Reconstruction of Slavic gord in Groß Raden, Mecklenburg
Reconstruction of Slavic gord in Lusatia - Raddusch, Vetschau
The Limes Saxoniae border between the Saxons and the Lechites Obotrites, established about 810 in present-day Schleswig-Holstein
Primary source about history of Polabian Slavs - Chronica Slavorum of Helmold from the 12th century translated to Polish language by Jan Papłoński in 1862.
Danish Bishop Absalon destroys the idol of Slavic god Svantevit at Arkona in a painting by Laurits Tuxen.
Reconstruction of Slavic gord near Neubrandenburg
Reconstruction of Slavic gord at the Burgwallinsel (Gord Island)

Polabian Slavs (Połobske słowjany, Słowianie połabscy, ) is a collective term applied to a number of Lechitic (West Slavic) tribes who lived along the Elbe river in what is today eastern Germany.

They have also been known as Elbe Slavs (Elbslawen) or Wends.

Obotrites

Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
Map of the Billunger Mark (c. 1000) showing different tribes of the Obotritic confederation
Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
The Limes Saxoniae forming the border between the Saxons to the west and the Obotrites to the east
Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
Niklot (1090–1160), prince of the Obotritic confederation, Schwerin Castle

The Obotrites (Obotriti, Abodritorum, Abodritos…) or Obodrites, also spelled Abodrites (Abodriten), were a confederation of medieval West Slavic tribes within the territory of modern Mecklenburg and Holstein in northern Germany (see Polabian Slavs).

In common with other Slavic groups, they were often described by Germanic sources as Wends.

Lutici

Lutician federation (983–1056/57)
Conrad II
Henry IV
The expedition of Bolesław III of Poland to Szczecin and east of the Oder to subjugate the Slavic Lutici, in 1121.
Otto of Bamberg, Pomeranian Dukes' Castle, Szczecin (Stettin)
Information board near the lake Lieps, claiming to be the site of Radgosc (Rethra). However, a scholarly consensus on the temple's location has not yet been established, and various theories have been forwarded and refuted.

The Lutici or Liutizi (known by various spelling variants) were a federation of West Slavic Polabian tribes, who between the 10th and 12th centuries lived in what is now northeastern Germany.

After a period of dominance by the Hevelli, centered on the other important Wendish stronghold of Brenna (Brandenburg), the Redarii became a dominant regional power themselves after the 930s.

Lands of the Hevelli and Sprevane, about 1150

Hevelli

The Hevelli or Hevellians/ Navellasîni (sometimes Havolane; Heveller or Stodoranen; Hawelanie or Stodoranie; Havolané or Stodorané) were a tribe of the Polabian Slavs, who settled around the middle Havel river in the present-day Havelland region of Brandenburg in eastern Germany from the 8th century onwards.

The Hevelli or Hevellians/ Navellasîni (sometimes Havolane; Heveller or Stodoranen; Hawelanie or Stodoranie; Havolané or Stodorané) were a tribe of the Polabian Slavs, who settled around the middle Havel river in the present-day Havelland region of Brandenburg in eastern Germany from the 8th century onwards.

Lands of the Hevelli and Sprevane, about 1150

West Slavic tribes ("Wends") had settled in the Germania Slavica region from the 7th century onwards.

Christianization of the Rani; Slavic settlements, German towns with pagan temples and Christian monasteries

Rani (Slavic tribe)

Christianization of the Rani; Slavic settlements, German towns with pagan temples and Christian monasteries
A priest of Svantevit depicted on a stone from Arkona, now in the church of Altenkirchen.
Bishop Absalon topples the god Svantevit at Arkona. Painting by Laurits Tuxen.

The Rani or Rujani (Ranen, Rujanen) were a West Slavic tribe based on the island of Rugia (Rügen) and the southwestern mainland across the Strelasund in what is today northeastern Germany.

This temple was worshipped and collected tributes not only from the Rani, but from all Baltic Wends after their earlier main religious centre, Rethra, was destroyed in by Germanic raiders in 1068/9.

Traditional female costume of Lower Lusatia (Spreewald)

Sorbs

Traditional female costume of Lower Lusatia (Spreewald)
Map of the Sorbian-Lusatian tribes between the 7th and 11th century, by Wilhelm Bogusławski, 1861.
The reconstructed Lusatian gord (fortification) of Raduš (Raddusch), near Vetschau in Lower Lusatia.
"House of the Sorbs" (Serbski dom) in Bautzen
Bautzen, German-Sorbian folk theatre
1982 stamps from the East German period
Bilingual names of streets in Cottbus
Sorbian flag
The Flag of Upper Lusatia
Coat of arms of Upper Lusatia, as drawn by Hugo Gerard Ströhl
The Flag of Lower Lusatia
Coat of arms of Lower Lusatia, as drawn by Hugo Gerard Ströhl
Lusatia was part of the Polish state between 1002 and 1031 under the rule of Bolesław I.
Map of approximate Sorb-inhabited area in Germany.
Map of area and towns inhabited by Sorbs.
Detailed map of Sorb-inhabited area in Germany (in Lower Sorbian).

Sorbs (, Serby, Sorben, also known as Lusatians and Wends) are a West Slavic ethnic group predominantly inhabiting the parts of Lusatia located in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg.

Map of the Slovene diaspora in the world

Slovenes

The Slovenes, also known as Slovenians (Slovenci ), are a South Slavic ethnic group native to Slovenia, and adjacent regions in Italy, Austria and Hungary.

The Slovenes, also known as Slovenians (Slovenci ), are a South Slavic ethnic group native to Slovenia, and adjacent regions in Italy, Austria and Hungary.

Map of the Slovene diaspora in the world
Peter Kozler's map of the Slovene Lands, designed during the Spring of Nations in 1848, became the symbol of the quest for a United Slovenia.
Socialist Republic of Slovenia within the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
Coat of arms of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia

The Slovenian population displays close genetic affiliations with West Slavic, Germanic and Italic populations.

Those who settled in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania came to be called Windish, from the Austrian German term Windisch 'Wend'.

Slovaks

Ján Hollý (portrait from 1885)
A statue of Svätopluk I
Pribina, ruler of Principality of Nitra, established and ruled the Balaton Principality from 839/840 to 861.
Gallery of famous Slovak people, active in different areas (history, literature, education, religion, science). Published on occasion of establishing Matica slovenská ("Slovak Foundation"), major patriotic organization. List of portraited personalities: Ján Mallý-Dusarov, Juraj Tvrdý, Jozef Kozáček, Štefan Moyzes, Martin Čulen, Karol Kuzmány, Štefan Závodník, Michal Chrástek, Viliam Pauliny-Tóth, Michal Miloslav Hodža, Štefan Marko Daxner, Ján Francisci-Rimavský, Ján Gotčár, Andrej Ľudovít Radlinský, Jozef Miloslav Hurban, Jonáš Záborský, Jozef Karol Viktorin, Mikuláš Štefan Ferienčík, Ján Kalinčiak, Martin Hattala, Ján Palárik, František Víťazoslav Sasinek, Andrej Sládkovič, Daniel Gabriel Lichard, Ján Čipka, Juraj Slota, Andrej Kossa
Zdeno Chára, ice hockey player and former captain of Boston Bruins
Dominika Cibulková, Slovak tennis player
Ján Francisci-Rimavský poet, politician and revolutionary
Jozef Gabčík, Slovak soldier, Reinhard Heydrich assassin
Marek Hamšík, Slovak professional footballer and former captain of Napoli
Daniela Hantuchová, Slovak tennis player
Marián Hossa, ice hockey player and member of the Hockey Hall of Fame
Miroslav Iringh, one of the Warsaw Uprising organisers
Jana Kirschner, singer and songwriter
Stan Mikita, ice hockey player and member of the Hockey Hall of Fame
Peter Sagan, professional road bicycle racer and a world champion
Adriana Sklenaříková, fashion model and actress
Peter Šťastný, ice hockey player and member of the Hockey Hall of Fame
Viola Valachová, partisan
Slovaks in Vojvodina, Serbia (2002 census)
The language spread of Slovak in the United States according to U. S. Census 2000 and other resources interpreted by research of U. S. English Foundation, percentage of home speakers

The Slovaks (Slováci, singular: Slovák, feminine: Slovenka, plural: Slovenky) are a West Slavic ethnic group and nation native to Slovakia who share a common ancestry, culture, history and speak Slovak.

The final three terms are variations of the Germanic term Wends, which was historically used to refer to any Slavs living close to Germanic settlements.