Wessex

West SaxonsWest SaxonKingdom of WessexSaxonsSaxonWessex DragonWest Saxon Kingdomkingthe medieval Anglo-Saxon kingdomthe west Saxons
Wessex (Westseaxna rīce, the ‘Kingdom of the West Saxons’) was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom in the south of Great Britain, from 519 until England was unified by Æthelstan in 927.wikipedia
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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

Anglo Saxon ChronicleThe Anglo-Saxon ChronicleAnglo-Saxon Chronicles
The two main sources for the history of Wessex are the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the West Saxon Genealogical Regnal List, which sometimes conflict.
The original manuscript of the Chronicle was created late in the 9th century, probably in Wessex, during the reign of Alfred the Great (r.

Kingdom of Kent

KentKentishking of Kent
Cædwalla later conquered Sussex, Kent and the Isle of Wight.
It existed from either the fifth or the sixth century CE until it was fully absorbed into the Kingdom of Wessex in the late 9th century and later into Kingdom of England in the early 10th century.

Kingdom of Sussex

SussexSouth SaxonsKingdom of the South Saxons
Cædwalla later conquered Sussex, Kent and the Isle of Wight.
The South Saxons were ruled by the kings of Sussex until the country was annexed by Wessex, probably in 827, in the aftermath of the Battle of Ellandun.

Cerdic of Wessex

CerdicCerdric6th century
The Anglo-Saxons believed that Wessex was founded by Cerdic and Cynric, but this may be a legend.
Cerdic (Cerdicus) is cited in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as a leader of the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain, being the founder and first king of Saxon Wessex, reigning from 519 to 534 AD.

Shire

shiresshiringsheires
It was during this period that the system of shires was established.
It was first used in Wessex from the beginning of Anglo-Saxon settlement, and spread to most of the rest of England in the tenth century.

Mercia

Kingdom of MerciaMerciansMercian
During the 8th century, as the hegemony of Mercia grew, Wessex largely retained its independence.
Mercia dominated what would later become England for three centuries, subsequently going into a gradual decline while Wessex eventually conquered and united all the kingdoms into the Kingdom of England.

Ecgberht, King of Wessex

Egbert of WessexEgbertKing Egbert
Under Egbert, Surrey, Sussex, Kent, Essex, and Mercia, along with parts of Dumnonia, were conquered.
Ecgberht (771/775 – 839), also spelled Egbert, Ecgbert, or Ecgbriht, was King of Wessex from 802 until his death in 839.

Battle of Edington

Battle of EthandunEgbert's StoneEdington
In 878 they forced Alfred to flee to the Somerset Levels, but were eventually defeated at the Battle of Edington.
At the Battle of Edington, an army of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex under Alfred the Great defeated the Great Heathen Army led by Guthrum on a date between 6 and 12 May AD 878, resulting in the Treaty of Wedmore later the same year.

Edward the Elder

EdwardKing EdwardKing Edward the Elder
Alfred's son, Edward, captured the eastern Midlands and East Anglia from the Danes and became ruler of Mercia in 918 upon the death of his sister, Æthelflæd.
Alfred had succeeded Æthelred as king of Wessex in 871, and almost faced defeat against the Danish Vikings until his decisive victory at the Battle of Edington in 878.

Kingdom of England

EnglandEnglishAnglo
Wessex (Westseaxna rīce, the ‘Kingdom of the West Saxons’) was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom in the south of Great Britain, from 519 until England was unified by Æthelstan in 927.
The kingdom of England emerged from the gradual unification of the early medieval Anglo-Saxon kingdoms known as the Heptarchy: East Anglia, Mercia, Northumbria, Kent, Essex, Sussex, and Wessex.

Winchester

Winchester, HampshireWinchester, EnglandMatterley Basin
During the Roman occupation starting in the 1st century AD, numerous country villas with attached farms were established across Wessex, along with the important towns of Dorchester and Winchester (the ending -chester comes from Latin castra, "a military camp").
In 648, King Cenwalh of Wessex erected the Church of SS Peter and Paul, later known as the Old Minster.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
They devastated many parts of Britain and laid siege to London.
It was an area of political and geographical control imposed by the Viking incursions which was formally agreed by the Danish warlord, Guthrum and the West Saxon king Alfred the Great in 886.

Saxons

SaxonSassenachSaxon people
However, when finally faced with northern invaders, a certain unnamed ruler in Britain (called "a proud tyrant" by Gildas) requested assistance from the Saxons in exchange for land.
Their names, along with those of Sussex and Wessex, contain a remnant of the word "Saxon".

Wessex culture

during the Bronze Ageearly Bronze AgeWessex
Modern archaeologists use the term Wessex culture for a Middle Bronze Age culture in this area (c.
It should not be confused with the later Saxon kingdom of Wessex.

Somerset

SomersetshireSomerset, EnglandCounty of Somerset
Ceawlin overcame pockets of resisting Britons to the northeast, in the Chilterns, Gloucestershire and Somerset. After his return, Cenwealh faced further attacks from Penda's successor Wulfhere, but was able to expand West Saxon territory in Somerset at the expense of the Britons.
Somerset was a part of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex, and the phrase refers to the wholehearted support the people of Somerset gave to King Alfred in his struggle to save Wessex from Viking invaders.

Ceawlin of Wessex

CeawlinCealinBattle of Fethanleigh
It is presumed that Ceawlin, who succeeded Cynric in about 581, was his son.
He may have been the son of Cynric of Wessex and the grandson of Cerdic of Wessex, whom the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle represents as the leader of the first group of Saxons to come to the land which later became Wessex.

Cynegils

Cynegils of Wessex
Six years later, in about 594, Ceol was succeeded by a brother, Ceolwulf, who was succeeded in his turn in about 617 by Cynegils. It is in Cynegils' reign that the first event in West Saxon history that can be dated with reasonable certainty occurs: the baptism of Cynegils by Birinus, which happened at the end of the 630s, perhaps in 640.
Cynegils was King of Wessex from c. 611 to c. 642.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth, EnglandCity of PortsmouthPortsmouth, Hampshire
The Chronicle continues, stating that "Port, and his two sons Bieda and Mægla", landed at Portsmouth in 501 and killed a high-ranking British nobleman.
In 787, it was assaulted and conquered by Danish pirates, and then during the reign of Æthelwulf, King of Wessex in 838, a Danish fleet landed between Portsmouth and Southampton and the surrounding area was plundered.

Ceol of Wessex

Ceol
Ceawlin was deposed, perhaps by his nephew, Ceol, and died a year later.
Ceol (also known as Ceola or Ceolric) was King of Wessex from 592 to 597.

Gloucester

City of GloucesterGloucester, EnglandGloucester, Gloucestershire
The capture of Cirencester, Gloucester and Bath in 577, after the pause caused by the battle of Mons Badonicus, opened the way to the southwest.
Anglo-Saxon migrants followed by their fledgling feudal structure, the Kingdom of Wessex, overturned and culturally overwhelmed the area's Romano-Celtic society and gradually Anglicised similar spoken forms to Caerloyw (roughly ), Gloucester's name in modern Welsh.

Hengist and Horsa

HengistHengestHorsa
One of the English traditions about the Saxon arrival is that of Hengest and Horsa.
The Saxons populated Essex, Sussex, and Wessex; the Jutes Kent, the Isle of Wight, and part of Hampshire; and the Angles East Anglia, Mercia, and Northumbria (leaving their original homeland, Angeln, deserted).

Creoda of Wessex

Creoda
Although the entry mentions Cynric as Cerdic's son, a different source lists him as the son of Cerdic's son, Creoda.
died 534) is a shadowy figure in early Wessex history whose existence is disputed, mentioned only in the Genealogical Regnal List that serves as preface to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

Birinus

St BirinusSaint BirinusBerin
It is in Cynegils' reign that the first event in West Saxon history that can be dated with reasonable certainty occurs: the baptism of Cynegils by Birinus, which happened at the end of the 630s, perhaps in 640.
600 – 649 or 650) was the first Bishop of Dorchester and was known as the "Apostle to the West Saxons" for his conversion of the Kingdom of Wessex to Christianity.

Wulfhere of Mercia

WulfhereKing WulfhereKing Wulfhere of Mercia
After his return, Cenwealh faced further attacks from Penda's successor Wulfhere, but was able to expand West Saxon territory in Somerset at the expense of the Britons.
His campaigns against the West Saxons led to Mercian control of much of the Thames valley.

Sussex

County of SussexSussex, EnglandSouth Saxon
Cædwalla reigned for just two years, but achieved a dramatic expansion of the kingdom's power, conquering the kingdoms of Sussex, Kent and the Isle of Wight, although Kent regained its independence almost immediately and Sussex followed some years later.
Around 827, it was absorbed into the kingdom of Wessex and subsequently into the kingdom of England.