West Berlin

West-BerlinWestBerlinWest Berlin, West GermanyAmerican SectorBerlin (West)occupied BerlinWestern BerlinWestberlinwestern
West Berlin (Berlin (West) or colloquially West-Berlin) was a political enclave which comprised the western part of Berlin during the years of the Cold War.wikipedia
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Berlin

Berlin, GermanyState of BerlinGerman capital
West Berlin (Berlin (West) or colloquially West-Berlin) was a political enclave which comprised the western part of Berlin during the years of the Cold War.
After World War II and its subsequent occupation by the victorious countries, the city was divided; West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989) and East German territory.

Enclave and exclave

exclaveenclaveexclaves
West Berlin (Berlin (West) or colloquially West-Berlin) was a political enclave which comprised the western part of Berlin during the years of the Cold War.
An historical example is West Berlin before the reunification of Germany.

Berlin Wall

fall of the Berlin WallWallthe wall
The Berlin Wall, built in 1961, physically separated West Berlin from its East Berlin and East German surroundings until it fell in 1989.
The Wall cut off West Berlin from surrounding East Germany, including East Berlin.

West Germany

West GermanFederal Republic of GermanyGermany
West Berlin aligned itself politically with the Federal Republic of Germany (called the "Bonn Republic" by historians) and was directly or indirectly represented in its federal institutions.
In addition to the resulting ten states, West Berlin was considered an unofficial de facto eleventh state.

East Berlin

BerlinEastEast-Berlin
West Berlin was formally controlled by the Western Allies and was entirely surrounded by the Soviet-controlled East Berlin and East Germany.
The American, British, and French sectors were known as West Berlin.

Inner German border

borderinner-German borderseparated
West Berlin was 100 mi east and north of the Inner German border and only accessible by land from West Germany by narrow rail and highway corridors.
The better-known Berlin Wall was a physically separate, less elaborate, and much shorter border barrier surrounding West Berlin, more than 155 km to the east of the inner German border.

West Berlin Air Corridor

air corridorsAllied air corridorsBerlin Air Corridor
The West responded by using its air corridors for supplying their part of the city with food and other goods through the Berlin Airlift.
During the Cold War era (1945–1991), the West Berlin air corridors, also known as the Berlin corridors and control zone, were three regulated airways for civil and military air traffic of the Western Allies between West Berlin and West Germany passing over East Germany's territory.

Basic Law for the Federal Republic of Germany

Basic LawGerman constitutionGrundgesetz
Under Article 127 of the Basic Law (or constitution) of the Federal Republic, provision was made for federal laws to be extended to Greater Berlin (as West Berlin was officially known) as well as Baden, Rhineland-Palatinate and Württemberg-Hohenzollern within one year of its promulgation.
Its original field of application (Geltungsbereich) — that is, the states that were initially included in the Federal Republic of Germany — consisted of the three Western Allies' zones of occupation, but at the insistence of the Western Allies, formally excluded West Berlin.

German reunification

reunification of Germanyreunificationreunified
On 3 October 1990, the day Germany was officially reunified, East and West Berlin formally reunited as the city of Berlin.
Between 1947 and 1949, the three zones of the western allies were merged, forming the Federal Republic of Germany and West Berlin, aligned with capitalist Europe (which later developed into the European Community).

Willy Brandt

BrandtChancellor BrandtMayor Brandt
For example, Social Democrat Willy Brandt, who eventually became Chancellor, was elected via his party's list of candidates.
Brandt was originally considered one of the leaders of the right wing of the SPD, and earned initial fame as Governing Mayor of West Berlin.

States of Germany

stateGerman statefederal state
In many ways, West Berlin functioned as the de facto 11th state of West Germany, and was depicted on maps published in the West as being a part of West Germany.
West Berlin, while officially not part of the Federal Republic, was largely integrated and considered as a de facto state.

Fall of the Berlin Wall

fallBerlin Wall fellfall of the wall
The Berlin Wall, built in 1961, physically separated West Berlin from its East Berlin and East German surroundings until it fell in 1989.
Crucially, a journalist then asked if the regulation also applied to the crossings to West Berlin.

Ich bin ein Berliner

West Berlin speecha widespread misconceptionaddresses
On 26 June 1963, President Kennedy visited West Berlin and gave a public speech known for its famous phrase "Ich bin ein Berliner".
"Ich bin ein Berliner" (, "I am a Berliner") is a speech by United States President John F. Kennedy given on June 26, 1963, in West Berlin.

Bundestag

German BundestagGerman Parliamentparliament
Consequently, West Berliners were indirectly represented in the Bundestag in Bonn by 22 non-voting delegates chosen by the House of Representatives.
Because West Berlin was not officially under the jurisdiction of the Constitution, a legacy of the Cold War, the Bundestag met in Bonn in several different buildings, including (provisionally) a former waterworks facility.

Abgeordnetenhaus of Berlin

AbgeordnetenhausBerlin House of RepresentativesBerlin
On 4 August 1950 the House of Representatives (the city's legislature) passed a new constitution, declaring Berlin to be a state of the Federal Republic and the provisions of the Basic Law as binding law superior to Berlin state law (Article 1, clauses 2 and 3).
The Abgeordnetenhaus was established by the new constitution of West Berlin in 1951.

Cold War

The Cold WarCold War eraCold-War
West Berlin (Berlin (West) or colloquially West-Berlin) was a political enclave which comprised the western part of Berlin during the years of the Cold War.
Shortly thereafter, Stalin instituted the Berlin Blockade (24 June 1948 – 12 May 1949), one of the first major crises of the Cold War, preventing food, materials and supplies from arriving in West Berlin.

Tear down this wall!

tear down this walltear down1987 speech
Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!
"Tear down this wall", also known as the Berlin Wall Speech, is a speech delivered by United States President Ronald Reagan in West Berlin on Friday, June 12, 1987.

Bonn

Bonn, GermanyBonn, West GermanyBonn-Beuel
Consequently, West Berliners were indirectly represented in the Bundestag in Bonn by 22 non-voting delegates chosen by the House of Representatives.
Former chancellor and mayor of West Berlin Willy Brandt caused considerable offence to the Western Allies during the debate by stating that France would not have kept the seat of government at Vichy after Liberation.

Transit Agreement (1972)

Transit AgreementtransitTransit Treaty (1972)
The Four Power Agreement on Berlin (September 1971) and the Transit Agreement (May 1972) helped to significantly ease tensions over the status of West Berlin.
The Transit Agreement or Transit Treaty of 26 May 1972 arranged access to and from West Berlin from West Germany, secured the right of West Berliners to visit East Berlin and East Germany, and secured the rights of East German citizens to visit West Germany, although only in cases of family emergency.

Tiergarten, Berlin

TiergartenBerlin-Tiergarten Tiergarten
Notable for the great and homonymous urban park, before German reunification, it was a part of West Berlin.

Deutsche Bundespost Berlin

Deutsche Post Berlin (Deutsche Bundespost Berlin)
West Berlin had its own postal administration first called Deutsche Post Berlin (1947–1955) and then Deutsche Bundespost Berlin, separate from West Germany's Deutsche Bundespost, and issuing its own postage stamps until 1990.
The Deutsche Bundespost Berlin (German Federal Mail of Berlin) was the name used on the stamps of West Berlin.

Governing Mayor of Berlin

Mayor of BerlinGoverning Mayormayor
West Berlin was run by the elected Governing Mayor and Senate seated at Rathaus Schöneberg.
Following the Communist putsch in Berlin's city government in September 1948 a separate city parliament (still named Stadtverordnetenversammlung von Groß-Berlin), however, de facto only competent for the western occupation sectors of what was to become West Berlin was elected on 5 December 1948, electing two days later a separate city government and Ernst Reuter Lord Mayor for West Berlin.

Schöneberg

Berlin-SchönebergSchoenebergSchöneberg, Berlin
The airspace controlled by the Berlin Air Safety Center comprised a radius of 20 miles (32.12 km) around the seat of the Center in the Kammergericht building in Berlin-Schöneberg – thus covering most of East and West Berlin and the three corridors, of the same width – one northwestwards to Hamburg (Fuhlsbüttel Airport), one westwards to Hanover, and one southwestwards to Frankfurt upon Main (Rhein-Main Air Base).
Subsequent to World War II the Rathaus served as the city hall of West Berlin until 1991 when the administration of the reunited City of Berlin moved back to the Rotes Rathaus in Mitte.

Mitte (locality)

MitteBerlin-Mittecentral Berlin
On 1 February 1951, East German Volkspolizei surprised the people of western Staaken by occupying the area and ended its administration by the Spandau Borough; instead, western Staaken became an exclave of the Soviet occupied borough Berlin-Mitte in the city centre.
Following a territorial redeployment by the Soviet Union and the United Kingdom that reshaped the borders of West Berlin's British Sector in August 1945, the western part of Staaken became in effect as of 1 February 1951 an exclave of Mitte, then still a borough of East Berlin.

Spandau

Berlin-SpandauBezirk SpandauBerlin – Spandau
Private West Berlin railway lines like the Neukölln–Mittenwalde railway (Neukölln-Mittenwalder Eisenbahn, NME), connecting the East German Mittenwalde with West Berlin-Neukölln and the Bötzowbahn between West Berlin-Spandau and East German Hennigsdorf, were disrupted at the border between West Berlin and East Germany on 26 October 1948 and August 1950, respectively.
After World War II Spandau fell into the British and American sector of West Berlin during the allied occupation.