A report on West End theatre

The Palace Theatre, in the City of Westminster, London, built in 1891
The London Palladium in Soho opened in 1910. While the Theatre has a resident show, it also has one-off performances such as concerts. Since 1930 it has hosted the Royal Variety Performance 43 times.
Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. Opened in May 1663, it is the oldest theatre in London.
Original interior of Savoy Theatre in 1881, the year it became the first public building in the world to be lit entirely by electricity.
The Lyceum Theatre, home to Disney's The Lion King.
Queen's Theatre showing Les Misérables, running in London since October 1985
The restored facade of the Dominion Theatre, as seen in 2017
The St Martin's Theatre, home to The Mousetrap, the world's longest-running play.
The exterior of the Old Vic
The Royal Court Theatre. Upstairs is used as an experimental space for new projects—The Rocky Horror Show premiered here in 1973.
West End theatres on Shaftesbury Avenue in 2016
Gilbert and Sullivan play at the Savoy in 1881
Victoria Palace Theatre (showing Billy Elliot in 2012) was refurbished in 2017.

Mainstream professional theatre staged in the large theatres in and near the West End of London.

- West End theatre
The Palace Theatre, in the City of Westminster, London, built in 1891

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Olivier in 1972

Laurence Olivier

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English actor and director who, along with his contemporaries Ralph Richardson and John Gielgud, was one of a trio of male actors who dominated the British stage of the mid-20th century.

English actor and director who, along with his contemporaries Ralph Richardson and John Gielgud, was one of a trio of male actors who dominated the British stage of the mid-20th century.

Olivier in 1972
The house in Wathen Road, Dorking, Surrey, where Olivier was born in 1907
Interior of All Saints, Margaret Street
Peggy Ashcroft, a contemporary and friend of Olivier's at the Central School of Speech Training and Dramatic Art, photographed in 1936
Olivier, with his first wife Jill Esmond (left), in 1932
The Old Vic (photographed in 2012), where Olivier honed his skill as a Shakespearean
Olivier, with Merle Oberon in the 1939 film Wuthering Heights
Olivier with Joan Fontaine in the 1940 film Rebecca
Overseas newspaper correspondents visit the set of Henry V at Denham Studios in 1943
Co-director and co-star: Ralph Richardson in the 1940s
Olivier with Leigh in Australia, 1948
Olivier and Leigh in 1957
Olivier, with Joan Plowright in The Entertainer on Broadway in 1958
Poster for Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, one of two films in which Olivier appeared in 1960
Laurence Olivier in 1972, during the production of Sleuth
Olivier in 1939

In 1930 he had his first important West End success in Noël Coward's Private Lives, and he appeared in his first film.

Gielgud as Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing, 1959

John Gielgud

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English actor and theatre director whose career spanned eight decades.

English actor and theatre director whose career spanned eight decades.

Gielgud as Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing, 1959
Centre: Marion, Kate and Ellen Terry and, far right, Fred Terry at Ellen's Silver Jubilee matinée, Drury Lane, 12 June 1906. Everyone shown was a member of the Terry family.
Noël Coward with Lilian Braithwaite, his, and later Gielgud's, co-star in The Vortex
Mrs Patrick Campbell and Edith Evans, 1920s co-stars with Gielgud
The Old Vic (photographed in 2012), where Gielgud honed his skill as a Shakespearean
Mabel Terry-Lewis, Gielgud's aunt and co-star in The Importance of Being Earnest
Peggy Ashcroft in 1936
Gielgud in a publicity photograph for Secret Agent (1936)
Interior of the Queen's Theatre
Gielgud and Dolly Haas in Crime and Punishment, Broadway, 1947
Edmond O'Brien (Casca, left) and Gielgud (Cassius) in Julius Caesar (1953)
Gielgud, 1953
Much Ado About Nothing: Gielgud as Benedick and Margaret Leighton as Beatrice, 1959
Gielgud (left) as Joseph Surface, and Ralph Richardson as Sir Peter Teazle, The School for Scandal, 1962
Gielgud in 1973, by Allan Warren

After studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art he worked in repertory theatre and in the West End before establishing himself at the Old Vic as an exponent of Shakespeare in 1929–31.

The John Golden Theatre, Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, and Booth Theatre on West 45th Street in Manhattan's Theater District

Broadway theatre

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Broadway theatre, or Broadway, are the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and the Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Broadway theatre, or Broadway, are the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and the Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

The John Golden Theatre, Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, and Booth Theatre on West 45th Street in Manhattan's Theater District
Interior of the Park Theatre, built in 1798
The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical. Poster for the 1873 revival by The Kiralfy Brothers.
Sheet music to "Give My Regards to Broadway"
Victor Herbert
Broadway north from 38th St., New York City, showing the Casino and Knickerbocker Theatres ("Listen, Lester", visible at lower right, played the Knickerbocker from December 23, 1918, to August 16, 1919), a sign pointing to Maxine Elliott's Theatre, which is out of view on 39th Street, and a sign advertising the Winter Garden Theatre, which is out of view at 50th Street. All but the Winter Garden are demolished. The old Metropolitan Opera House and the old Times Tower are visible on the left.

Broadway and London's West End together represent the highest commercial level of live theater in the English-speaking world.

Coward in 1972

Noël Coward

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English playwright, composer, director, actor, and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise".

English playwright, composer, director, actor, and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise".

Coward in 1972
Coward (left) with Lydia Bilbrook and Charles Hawtrey, 1911
Coward in his early teens
Coward in The Knight of the Burning Pestle in 1920
Coward with Lilian Braithwaite, his co-star in The Vortex and the mother of his close friend Joyce Carey
Coward, 1925photograph
Ivor Novello, top l., Alfred Lunt, top r., Lynn Fontanne, lower l. and Judy Campbell – stars of Coward premières of the 1920s–1940s
Coward, with Norman Hackforth at the piano, performing for sailors aboard in Ceylon, August 1944
"Dad's Renaissance": Coward's popularity surged in the 1960s; this poster features Al Hirschfeld's drawing of Coward rather than the stars of this 1968 revival.
The Noël Coward Theatre
Coward as Slightly in Peter Pan in 1913
Coward in his home in Switzerland in 1972
The Coward image: with cigarette holder in 1930
Coward in 1963

Coward played in the piece in 1911 and 1912 at the Garrick Theatre in London's West End.

Really Useful Group

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International company set up in 1977 by Andrew Lloyd Webber.

International company set up in 1977 by Andrew Lloyd Webber.

Really Useful Films logo

Lee Mead, who won the lead role in 2007's West End revival of Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat by taking part in BBC One's Any Dream Will Do! recorded a single of the song "Any Dream Will Do".

Piccadilly Circus, the heart of the West End, in September 2012

West End of London

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Piccadilly Circus, the heart of the West End, in September 2012
Shaftesbury Avenue from Piccadilly Circus in 1949
Dragon statue on the Temple Bar monument, which marks the boundary between the City of Westminster and City of London
Her Majesty's Theatre in Haymarket, home to Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera
Marble Arch

The West End of London (commonly referred to as the West End) is a district of Central London, west of the City of London and north of the River Thames, in which many of the city's major tourist attractions, shops, businesses, government buildings and entertainment venues, including West End theatres, are concentrated.

The Palace Theatre

Palace Theatre, London

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The Palace Theatre
Ivanhoe programme cover from the theatre's first night
Maud Allan as Salome with the head of John the Baptist
Les Misérables played at the Palace Theatre from 1985 to 2004
Singin' in the Rain at the Palace Theatre, London

The Palace Theatre is a West End theatre in the City of Westminster in London.

Shaw in 1911, by Alvin Langdon Coburn

George Bernard Shaw

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Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist.

Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist.

Shaw in 1911, by Alvin Langdon Coburn
Shaw's birthplace (2012 photograph). The plaque reads "Bernard Shaw, author of many plays, was born in this house, 26 July 1856".
Shaw in 1879
William Archer, colleague and benefactor of Shaw
William Morris (left) and John Ruskin: important influences on Shaw's aesthetic views
Shaw in 1894 at the time of Arms and the Man
Gertrude Elliott and Johnston Forbes-Robertson in Caesar and Cleopatra, New York, 1906
Shaw in 1914, aged 57
Dublin city centre in ruins after the Easter Rising, April 1916
The rotating hut in the garden of Shaw's Corner, Ayot St Lawrence, where Shaw wrote most of his works after 1906
Shaw in 1936, aged 80
Garden of Shaw's Corner
"The strenuous literary life—George Bernard Shaw at work": 1904 caricature by Max Beerbohm
Shaw in 1905
Shaw's complete plays
Bust by Jacob Epstein

In the 1890s Shaw's plays were better known in print than on the West End stage; his biggest success of the decade was in New York in 1897, when Richard Mansfield's production of the historical melodrama The Devil's Disciple earned the author more than £2,000 in royalties.

Old Detroit Opera House c. 1905

Nederlander Organization

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One of the largest operators of live theaters and music venues in the United States.

One of the largest operators of live theaters and music venues in the United States.

Old Detroit Opera House c. 1905
Shubert Lafayette in July 1942
Grand Riviera Theatre in Detroit c. 1970
Grand Riviera Auditorium c. 1970

Since then, the organization has grown to include nine Broadway theaters – making it the second-largest owner of Broadway theaters after the Shubert Organization – and a number of theaters across the United States, including five large theaters in Chicago, plus three West End theatres in London.

Adelphi Theatre in 2007

Adelphi Theatre

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Adelphi Theatre in 2007
Sketch of a scene from Jane Scott's 1816 play, The Old Oak Chest
Charles Dickens' The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain at the Adelphi, in the Illustrated London News, 30 December 1848
Plaque commemorating William Terriss beside the stage door of the Adelphi Theatre
Cover of Vocal Score of Seymour Hicks' The Earl and the Girl
The Adelphi Theatre, 27 August 2011

The Adelphi Theatre is a West End theatre, located on the Strand in the City of Westminster, central London.