West End theatre

The Palace Theatre, in the City of Westminster, London, built in 1891
The London Palladium in Soho opened in 1910. While the Theatre has a resident show, it also has one-off performances such as concerts. Since 1930 it has hosted the Royal Variety Performance 43 times.
Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. Opened in May 1663, it is the oldest theatre in London.
Original interior of Savoy Theatre in 1881, the year it became the first public building in the world to be lit entirely by electricity.
The Lyceum Theatre, home to Disney's The Lion King.
Queen's Theatre showing Les Misérables, running in London since October 1985
The restored facade of the Dominion Theatre, as seen in 2017
The St Martin's Theatre, home to The Mousetrap, the world's longest-running play.
The exterior of the Old Vic
The Royal Court Theatre. Upstairs is used as an experimental space for new projects—The Rocky Horror Show premiered here in 1973.

Mainstream professional theatre staged in the large theatres in and near the West End of London.

- West End theatre
The Palace Theatre, in the City of Westminster, London, built in 1891

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One of Gilbert's illustrations for his Bab Ballad "Gentle Alice Brown"

Gilbert and Sullivan

Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian-era theatrical partnership of the dramatist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and the composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900) and to the works they jointly created.

Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian-era theatrical partnership of the dramatist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and the composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900) and to the works they jointly created.

One of Gilbert's illustrations for his Bab Ballad "Gentle Alice Brown"
Ages Ago, during a rehearsal for which Frederic Clay introduced Gilbert to Sullivan
The Crystal Palace, where several early Sullivan works were first performed
A contemporary illustration of Thespis from The Illustrated London News of 6 January 1872
D. H. Friston's engraving of the original production of Trial by Jury
An early poster showing scenes from The Sorcerer, Pinafore, and Trial by Jury
The Pirate King
George Grossmith as Bunthorne in Patience, 1881
Barnett as The Fairy Queen
Princess Ida, Act II Finale: Hildebrand and soldiers rush through the gate.
Poster for The Mikado
W.H. Denny as Wilfred and Jessie Bond as Phoebe in Yeomen
Rutland Barrington and Courtice Pounds as Giuseppe and Marco in The Gondoliers
Original facade of the Savoy Theatre c.1881
In the midst of the quarrel, Gilbert dedicated a collection of Savoy opera lyrics, Songs of a Savoyard, to the composer
The drawing room scene from Act II of Utopia, Limited
The Entr'acte expresses its pleasure that Gilbert and Sullivan are reunited
1921 cartoon of Gilbert and Sullivan audiences
Advertisement for the first recording of The Mikado, 1917
Detail from a Punch cartoon, showing Sullivan and Gilbert.
1880 Pirates poster
Frontispiece to The Pinafore Picture Book, 1908
Poster for Ages Ago, during a rehearsal for which Frederic Clay introduced Gilbert to Sullivan

In 1980, a Broadway and West End production of Pirates produced by Joseph Papp brought new audiences to Gilbert and Sullivan.

Noël Coward Theatre in 2019

Noël Coward Theatre

Noël Coward Theatre in 2019
New Theatre, postcard, circa 1905
Noël Coward and Esmé Wynne in Coward's I'll Leave It to You, 1920

The Noël Coward Theatre, formerly known as the Albery Theatre, is a West End theatre in St. Martin's Lane in the City of Westminster, London.

Exterior of Her Majesty's Theatre, 2010

Her Majesty's Theatre

Exterior of Her Majesty's Theatre, 2010
Sir John Vanbrugh painted by Godfrey Kneller
King's (previously Queen's) Theatre, Haymarket, the 18th-century predecessor of the present theatre; watercolour by William Capon (V&A)
Actor-manager Richard Brinsley Sheridan, painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds
Interior of second theatre on the site, c. 1808. Drawing by Auguste Pugin and Thomas Rowlandson for Ackermann's Microcosm of London
Joseph Haydn in 1792
Season tickets for King's Theatre
A riot at the theatre, on 1 May 1813
Drawing of the theatre by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd, 1827–28
The royal box
Jenny Lind, The Swedish Nightingale, 1850
The theatre burned down in 1867.
Carl Rosa's opera company performed at the third theatre.
Herbert Beerbohm Tree as Cardinal Wolsey at the theatre, in a 1910 photograph
Phipps's new theatre
Shaw's Pygmalion ran at the theatre in 1914, starring Mrs Patrick Campbell as Eliza.
Oscar Asche in Chu Chin Chow. Its record-breaking run of 2,235 performances at the theatre began in 1916.
The 'boat scene' in Phantom is achieved using surviving Victorian stage machinery.
Society of London Theatre plaque commemorating Her Majesty's Theatre

Her Majesty's Theatre is a West End theatre situated on Haymarket in the City of Westminster, London.

Photograph by Napoleon Sarony, c. 1882

Oscar Wilde

Irish poet and playwright.

Irish poet and playwright.

Photograph by Napoleon Sarony, c. 1882
The Wilde family home on Merrion Square
Oscar Wilde at Oxford
Photograph by Elliott & Fry of Baker Street, London, 1881
1881 caricature in Punch, the caption reads: "O.W.", "Oh, I eel just as happy as a bright sunflower, Lays of Christy Minstrelsy, "Æsthete of Æsthetes!/What's in a name!/The Poet is Wilde/But his poetry's tame."
Wilde lectured on the "English Renaissance in Art" during his US and Canada tour in 1882.
Keller cartoon from the Wasp of San Francisco depicting Wilde on the occasion of his visit there in 1882
Caricature of Wilde in Vanity Fair, 24 April 1884
No. 34 Tite Street, Chelsea, the Wilde family home from 1884 to his arrest in 1895. In Wilde's time this was No. 16 – the houses have been renumbered.
Robert Ross at twenty-four
Wilde reclining with Poems, by Napoleon Sarony in New York in 1882. Wilde often liked to appear idle, though in fact he worked hard; by the late 1880s he was a father, an editor, and a writer.
Wilde by W. & D. Downey of Ebury Street, London, 1889
Sheet music cover, 1880s
Plaque commemorating the dinner between Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle and the publisher of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine on 30 August 1889 at the Langham Hotel, London, that led to Wilde writing The Picture of Dorian Gray
Jokanaan and Salome. Illustration by Aubrey Beardsley for the 1893 edition of Salome.
Lake Windermere in northern England where Wilde began working on his first hit play, Lady Windermere's Fan (1892), during a summer visit in 1891.
Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas in 1893
St James's Theatre, London in the 1890s. The Importance of Being Earnest was Wilde's fourth West End hit in three years.
The Marquess of Queensberry's calling card with the handwritten offending inscription "For Oscar Wilde posing Somdomite [sic]". The card was marked as exhibit 'A' in Wilde's libel action.
Wilde in the dock, from The Illustrated Police News, 4 May 1895
Oscar Wilde's visiting card after his release from gaol
Oscar Wilde on his deathbed in 1900. Photograph by Maurice Gilbert.
The tomb of Oscar Wilde (surrounded by glass barrier) in Père Lachaise Cemetery
A Conversation with Oscar Wilde – a civic monument to Wilde by Maggi Hambling, on Adelaide Street, near Trafalgar Square, London. It contains the inscription, "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars".
Oscar Wilde Memorial Sculpture in Merrion Square, Dublin

Peter Raby said these essentially English plays were well-pitched: "Wilde, with one eye on the dramatic genius of Ibsen, and the other on the commercial competition in London's West End, targeted his audience with adroit precision".

Poster from the 1968 Theatre De Lys production featuring a sketch of Coward

Private Lives

1930 comedy of manners in three acts by Noël Coward.

1930 comedy of manners in three acts by Noël Coward.

Poster from the 1968 Theatre De Lys production featuring a sketch of Coward
Noël Coward and Gertrude Lawrence in the Broadway production of Private Lives (1931)
Coward in 1963
Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton were the headline stars in a 1983 Broadway production
Poster for the 1931 film, starring Norma Shearer and Robert Montgomery

A Broadway production followed in 1931, and the play has been revived at least a half dozen times each in the West End and on Broadway.

Adelphi Theatre in 2007

Adelphi Theatre

Adelphi Theatre in 2007
Sketch of a scene from Jane Scott's 1816 play, The Old Oak Chest
Charles Dickens' The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain at the Adelphi, in the Illustrated London News, 30 December 1848
Plaque commemorating William Terriss beside the stage door of the Adelphi Theatre
Cover of Vocal Score of Seymour Hicks' The Earl and the Girl
The Adelphi Theatre, 27 August 2011

The Adelphi Theatre is a West End theatre, located on the Strand in the City of Westminster, central London.

Laurence Olivier Award, designed by the sculptor Harry Franchetti. It depicts Olivier as Henry V at the Old Vic in 1937.

Laurence Olivier Awards

Annual ceremony in the capital.

Annual ceremony in the capital.

Laurence Olivier Award, designed by the sculptor Harry Franchetti. It depicts Olivier as Henry V at the Old Vic in 1937.
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The awards are given to individuals involved in West End productions and other leading non-commercial theatres based in London across a range of categories covering plays, musicals, dance, opera and affiliate theatre.

Piccadilly Circus, the heart of the West End, in September 2012

West End of London

Piccadilly Circus, the heart of the West End, in September 2012
Shaftesbury Avenue from Piccadilly Circus in 1949
Dragon statue on the Temple Bar monument, which marks the boundary between the City of Westminster and City of London
Her Majesty's Theatre in Haymarket, home to Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera
Marble Arch

The West End of London (commonly referred to as the West End) is a district of Central London, west of the City of London and north of the River Thames, in which many of the city's major tourist attractions, shops, businesses, government buildings and entertainment venues, including West End theatres, are concentrated.

Prince of Wales Theatre showing Mamma Mia!

Prince of Wales Theatre

Prince of Wales Theatre showing Mamma Mia!
The School for Scandal
Cover of the Vocal Score of Sidney Jones' King of Cadonia
Gracie Fields

The Prince of Wales Theatre is a West End theatre in Coventry Street, near Leicester Square in London.

The Vaudeville Theatre in 2014

Vaudeville Theatre

The Vaudeville Theatre in 2014
Henry Irving
Jerome K. Jerome
Seymour Hicks
Postcard of the Vaudeville Theatre, c. 1905
The rear premises of the Vaudeville Theatre, designed in 1925–1926 by Robert Atkinson
London Illustrated Almanac of 1872

The Vaudeville Theatre is a West End theatre on the Strand in the City of Westminster.