West Galicia

New GaliciaWestern GaliciaGaliciaNewNueva Galicia
New Galicia or West Galicia (Nowa Galicja or Galicja Zachodnia, Neugalizien or Westgalizien) was an administrative region of the Habsburg Monarchy, constituted from the territory annexed in the course of the Third Partition of Poland in 1795.wikipedia
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Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria

GaliciaAustrian GaliciaAustrian Poland
The Habsburg Monarchy, which had not participated in the Second Partition, now received a share that comprised the lands north of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria gained in the First Partition of 1772.
Following the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Austrian Empire ceded portions of Galicia to the Russian Empire, West Galicia and Tarnopol District.

Habsburg Monarchy

Habsburg EmpireHabsburgAustria
New Galicia or West Galicia (Nowa Galicja or Galicja Zachodnia, Neugalizien or Westgalizien) was an administrative region of the Habsburg Monarchy, constituted from the territory annexed in the course of the Third Partition of Poland in 1795.

Lesser Poland

MałopolskaLesser PolishEast Małopolska
The Habsburg Monarchy then occupied the entirety of Lesser Poland, stretching along the upper Vistula river to the outskirts of Praga and Warsaw, the tributaries of Bug and Pilica forming the northern border with New East Prussia.
Prussia managed to seize a small, western part of the province, with the towns of Siewierz, Zawiercie, Będzin, and Myszków, calling this land New Silesia, while the Austrians decided to name newly acquired lands of northern Lesser Poland West Galicia.

Personal union

personalUnionunited
With the Final Act of the Vienna Congress in 1815, the territory became part of Congress Poland, ruled in personal union by Emperor Alexander I of Russia, while Kraków nominally retained its independence as the Free City of Kraków.

Treaty of Schönbrunn

Peace of ViennaPeace of SchönbrunnTreaty of Vienna
Austria was finally defeated at the Battle of Wagram on 6 July, whereafter New Galicia was attached to the Duchy of Warsaw by the Treaty of Schönbrunn.
West Galicia was ceded to the Duchy of Warsaw, and Tarnopol district to the Russian Empire.

War of the Fifth Coalition

Fifth Coalition1809 campaignFifth
Austria lost New Galicia in the 1809 War of the Fifth Coalition, after a corps under Archduke Ferdinand Karl Joseph of Austria-Este on 15 April 1809 started the Polish–Austrian War by invading the Duchy of Warsaw.

Radom

Radom, PolandDistrikt Radom
For a few years (1795 - 1809) it was part of the Austrian province of West Galicia, and then (1809 - 1815) part of the Duchy of Warsaw, which named it capital of the Radom Department.

Galicia (Eastern Europe)

GaliciaGalicianHalychyna
In 1918, Western Galicia became a part of the restored Republic of Poland, which absorbed the Lemko-Rusyn Republic.

Third Partition of Poland

Third PartitionThird Partition of the Polish–Lithuanian CommonwealthThird Partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
New Galicia or West Galicia (Nowa Galicja or Galicja Zachodnia, Neugalizien or Westgalizien) was an administrative region of the Habsburg Monarchy, constituted from the territory annexed in the course of the Third Partition of Poland in 1795.

Kościuszko Uprising

Kościuszko's UprisingKościuszko InsurrectionKosciuszko Uprising
After the failed Kościuszko Uprising of 1794, Emperor Francis II of Habsburg agreed with Empress Catherine II of Russia to again divide and thereby completely abolish the remaining Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, a decision which Prussia joined on 24 October 1795.

Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor

Francis IIFrancis IFrancis I of Austria
After the failed Kościuszko Uprising of 1794, Emperor Francis II of Habsburg agreed with Empress Catherine II of Russia to again divide and thereby completely abolish the remaining Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, a decision which Prussia joined on 24 October 1795.

Catherine the Great

Catherine IICatherine II of RussiaEmpress Catherine II
After the failed Kościuszko Uprising of 1794, Emperor Francis II of Habsburg agreed with Empress Catherine II of Russia to again divide and thereby completely abolish the remaining Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, a decision which Prussia joined on 24 October 1795.

Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth

Polish-Lithuanian CommonwealthPolandPolish
After the failed Kościuszko Uprising of 1794, Emperor Francis II of Habsburg agreed with Empress Catherine II of Russia to again divide and thereby completely abolish the remaining Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, a decision which Prussia joined on 24 October 1795.

Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussian court
After the failed Kościuszko Uprising of 1794, Emperor Francis II of Habsburg agreed with Empress Catherine II of Russia to again divide and thereby completely abolish the remaining Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, a decision which Prussia joined on 24 October 1795.

Second Partition of Poland

Second PartitionBefore 17931793
The Habsburg Monarchy, which had not participated in the Second Partition, now received a share that comprised the lands north of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria gained in the First Partition of 1772.

First Partition of Poland

Before 1772First PartitionFirst Partition of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
The Habsburg Monarchy, which had not participated in the Second Partition, now received a share that comprised the lands north of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria gained in the First Partition of 1772.

Vistula

Vistula RiverRiver VistulaVistula delta
The Habsburg Monarchy then occupied the entirety of Lesser Poland, stretching along the upper Vistula river to the outskirts of Praga and Warsaw, the tributaries of Bug and Pilica forming the northern border with New East Prussia.

Praga

Stara PragaWarsaw-PragaPraga district of Warsaw
The Habsburg Monarchy then occupied the entirety of Lesser Poland, stretching along the upper Vistula river to the outskirts of Praga and Warsaw, the tributaries of Bug and Pilica forming the northern border with New East Prussia.

Warsaw

WarszawaWarsaw, PolandWarschau
The Habsburg Monarchy then occupied the entirety of Lesser Poland, stretching along the upper Vistula river to the outskirts of Praga and Warsaw, the tributaries of Bug and Pilica forming the northern border with New East Prussia.

Bug River

BugWestern BugBug rivers
The Habsburg Monarchy then occupied the entirety of Lesser Poland, stretching along the upper Vistula river to the outskirts of Praga and Warsaw, the tributaries of Bug and Pilica forming the northern border with New East Prussia.

Pilica (river)

PilicaPilica RiverPilica.
The Habsburg Monarchy then occupied the entirety of Lesser Poland, stretching along the upper Vistula river to the outskirts of Praga and Warsaw, the tributaries of Bug and Pilica forming the northern border with New East Prussia.

New East Prussia

New East Prussia Province
The Habsburg Monarchy then occupied the entirety of Lesser Poland, stretching along the upper Vistula river to the outskirts of Praga and Warsaw, the tributaries of Bug and Pilica forming the northern border with New East Prussia.

Austrian Empire

AustrianAustriaAustrians
It remained a territory of the Austrian Empire even when, in 1807, Napoleon I of France created the Duchy of Warsaw from territories in Greater Poland which Prussia had annexed in the Second and Third Partition and now was forced to renounce according to the Treaty of Tilsit.

Napoleon

Napoleon BonaparteNapoleon INapoleon I of France
It remained a territory of the Austrian Empire even when, in 1807, Napoleon I of France created the Duchy of Warsaw from territories in Greater Poland which Prussia had annexed in the Second and Third Partition and now was forced to renounce according to the Treaty of Tilsit.