West India Docks

West India Dock CompanyWest India DockBlackwall BasinWest IndiaSouth West India Dockdocks of that nameSouth DockWestWest India Dock (South Dock)West India Export Docks
The West India Docks are a series of three docks on the Isle of Dogs in London, England the first of which opened in 1802.wikipedia
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Canary Wharf

Canary Wharf financial districta bank buildingCanary Wharf District
The docks closed to commercial traffic in 1980 and the Canary Wharf development was built on the site. After the closure of the upstream enclosed docks, the area was regenerated as part of the Docklands scheme, and is now home to the developments of Canary Wharf.
Canary Wharf is located on the West India Docks on the Isle of Dogs.

Isle of Dogs

CrossharbourIsle of Dogs, Londonthe Isle of Dogs
The West India Docks are a series of three docks on the Isle of Dogs in London, England the first of which opened in 1802.
After the building of the Docks (especially the West India Docks and the adjacent City Canal), and with an increasing population, locals increasingly referred to the area as The Island.

Robert Milligan

Robert Milligan (c.
Robert Milligan (1746 – 21 May 1809) was a prominent Scottish merchant and ship-owner, and was the driving force behind the construction of the West India Docks in London.

George Hibbert

HibbertGeorge
Outraged at losses due to theft and delay at London's riverside wharves, Milligan headed a group of powerful businessmen, including the chairman of the London Society of West India Planters and Merchants, George Hibbert, who promoted the creation of a wet dock circled by a high wall.
With Robert Milligan, he was also one of the principals of the West India Dock Company which instigated the construction of the West India Docks on London's Isle of Dogs in 1800.

John Rennie the Elder

John RennieRennieJohn Rennie (engineer)
The two northern docks were constructed between 1800 and 1802 (officially opened on 27 August 1802) for the West India Dock Company to a design by leading civil engineer William Jessop (John Rennie was a consultant, and Thomas Morris, Liverpool's third dock engineer, was also involved; Ralph Walker was appointed resident engineer), and were the first commercial wet docks in London.
Rennie was also responsible for designing and building docks at Hull, Liverpool, Greenock, London (London, East India and West India docks), and Leith and improving the harbours and dockyards at Chatham, Devonport, Portsmouth, Holyhead, Ramsgate, Sheerness, Howth and Dunleary.

Ralph Walker (engineer)

Ralph Walker
The two northern docks were constructed between 1800 and 1802 (officially opened on 27 August 1802) for the West India Dock Company to a design by leading civil engineer William Jessop (John Rennie was a consultant, and Thomas Morris, Liverpool's third dock engineer, was also involved; Ralph Walker was appointed resident engineer), and were the first commercial wet docks in London.
Walker submitted designs for the City Canal in 1796 as part of his preliminary designs for the West India Docks on the Isle of Dogs, eventually being appointed resident engineer in August 1799, supervised by William Jessop.

William Jessop

Jessop
The two northern docks were constructed between 1800 and 1802 (officially opened on 27 August 1802) for the West India Dock Company to a design by leading civil engineer William Jessop (John Rennie was a consultant, and Thomas Morris, Liverpool's third dock engineer, was also involved; Ralph Walker was appointed resident engineer), and were the first commercial wet docks in London.
The West India Docks, built on the Isle of Dogs, was the first large wet docks built in the Port of London.

City Canal

The southern dock, the South West India Dock, later known as South Dock, was constructed in the 1860s, replacing the unprofitable City Canal, built in 1805.
Today, it has been almost completely reconstructed to form the South Dock of the West India Docks.

London Docklands

DocklandsLondon docksD3
After the closure of the upstream enclosed docks, the area was regenerated as part of the Docklands scheme, and is now home to the developments of Canary Wharf.
The first of the Georgian docks was the West India (opened in 1802), followed by the London (1805), the East India (also 1805), the Surrey (1807), the Regent's Canal Dock (1820), St Katharine (1828) and the West India South (1829).

Crossrail Place

The Crossrail Place development was completed in May 2015 and the Canary Wharf Crossrail station below it was completed in September 2015.
Crossrail Place is an artificial island in the West India Docks (North Dock) in Canary Wharf on the Isle of Dogs, it contains Canary Wharf station within and was partly opened on 1 May 2015.

Museum of London Docklands

Museum in DocklandsMuseum of DocklandsMuseum at Docklands
Part of the original dock building was converted for use as the Museum of London Docklands in 2003.
The museum opened in 2003 in grade I listed early-19th century Georgian "low" sugar warehouses built in 1802 on the side of West India Docks on the Isle of Dogs, a short walk from the Canary Wharf development.

Canary Wharf railway station

Canary WharfCanary Wharf Crossrail stationCanary Wharf station
The Crossrail Place development was completed in May 2015 and the Canary Wharf Crossrail station below it was completed in September 2015.
The station forms an artificial island in the West India Docks (North Dock).

North London Railway

NLRNorth LondonE&WID&BJR
Subsequently, the North London Railway's Poplar Dock was also connected to Blackwall Basin.
The North London Railway (NLR) company had lines connecting the north of London to the East and West India Docks in the east of the city.

Limehouse

Limehouse ReachSt Anne LimehouseLimehouse Blues
To avoid congestion, ships entered from the (eastern) Blackwall end; lighters entered from the Limehouse end to the west.
It is located between Stepney to the west and north, Mile End and Bow to the northwest, Poplar to the east, and Canary Wharf and Millwall to the south, and stretches from the end of Cable Street and Butcher Row in the west to Stainsby Road near Bartlett Park in the east, and from West India Dock (South Dock) and the River Thames in the south to Salmon Lane and Rhodeswell Road in the north.

Thomas Morris (engineer)

Thomas Morris
The two northern docks were constructed between 1800 and 1802 (officially opened on 27 August 1802) for the West India Dock Company to a design by leading civil engineer William Jessop (John Rennie was a consultant, and Thomas Morris, Liverpool's third dock engineer, was also involved; Ralph Walker was appointed resident engineer), and were the first commercial wet docks in London.
He left Liverpool in 1799 to work at West India Export Docks in London.

Poplar Dock

West India Docks Marina
Subsequently, the North London Railway's Poplar Dock was also connected to Blackwall Basin.
It connects to the Blackwall Basin of the West India Docks and, although independent of this system, has never had a direct connection to the Thames.

Port of London

LondonPort of London AuthorityLondon Port
These included West India Docks (1802), East India Docks (1803, originating from the Brunswick Dock of 1790), London Docks (1805), Surrey Commercial Docks (1807, originating from the Howland Great Wet Dock of 1696), St Katharine Docks (1828), Royal Victoria Dock (1855), Millwall Dock (1868), Royal Albert Dock (1880), and Tilbury docks (1886).

Blackwall, London

BlackwallBlackwall, MiddlesexBlackwall Dock, London
To avoid congestion, ships entered from the (eastern) Blackwall end; lighters entered from the Limehouse end to the west.
The 1980s, Blackwall saw the area first redevelopment project, a luxury housing complex called Jamestown Harbour over the Blackwall Basin, designed by WCEC Architects for the Wates Group and was completed by 1985.

Millwall Dock

Millwall DocksMillwallMillwall Inner Dock
South Dock was also connected to the north end of Millwall Dock, its enlarged eastern lock becoming the only entrance from the Thames to the whole West India and Millwall system.
With reorganisation by the Port of London Authority in the 1920s, the northern end of the Inner Dock was connected to the West India Docks by the Millwall Passage.

George Gwilt

George Gwilt the Elder
Around the Import Dock a continuous line of five-storey warehouses was constructed, designed by architect George Gwilt and his son, also named George.

Dock (maritime)

dockdockswet dock
The West India Docks are a series of three docks on the Isle of Dogs in London, England the first of which opened in 1802.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
The West India Docks are a series of three docks on the Isle of Dogs in London, England the first of which opened in 1802.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
The West India Docks are a series of three docks on the Isle of Dogs in London, England the first of which opened in 1802.

West Indies

West IndianCaribbean basinWest Indians
Milligan was a wealthy West Indies merchant and shipowner, who returned to London having previously managed his family's Jamaica sugar plantations.

Jamaica

JAMJamaicanJamaica, West Indies
Milligan was a wealthy West Indies merchant and shipowner, who returned to London having previously managed his family's Jamaica sugar plantations.