West Slavs

West Slav tribes in the 9th and 10th centuries
Reconstruction of the Slavic temple in Groß Raden
West Slavic languages

The West Slavs are a subgroup of Slavic peoples who speak the West Slavic languages.

- West Slavs

39 related topics

Alpha

Obotrites

Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
Map of the Billunger Mark (c. 1000) showing different tribes of the Obotritic confederation
Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
The Limes Saxoniae forming the border between the Saxons to the west and the Obotrites to the east
Main territory of the Obotritic confederation
Niklot (1090–1160), prince of the Obotritic confederation, Schwerin Castle

The Obotrites (Obotriti, Abodritorum, Abodritos…) or Obodrites, also spelled Abodrites (Abodriten), were a confederation of medieval West Slavic tribes within the territory of modern Mecklenburg and Holstein in northern Germany (see Polabian Slavs).

Slovaks

Ján Hollý (portrait from 1885)
A statue of Svätopluk I
Pribina, ruler of Principality of Nitra, established and ruled the Balaton Principality from 839/840 to 861.
Gallery of famous Slovak people, active in different areas (history, literature, education, religion, science). Published on occasion of establishing Matica slovenská ("Slovak Foundation"), major patriotic organization. List of portraited personalities: Ján Mallý-Dusarov, Juraj Tvrdý, Jozef Kozáček, Štefan Moyzes, Martin Čulen, Karol Kuzmány, Štefan Závodník, Michal Chrástek, Viliam Pauliny-Tóth, Michal Miloslav Hodža, Štefan Marko Daxner, Ján Francisci-Rimavský, Ján Gotčár, Andrej Ľudovít Radlinský, Jozef Miloslav Hurban, Jonáš Záborský, Jozef Karol Viktorin, Mikuláš Štefan Ferienčík, Ján Kalinčiak, Martin Hattala, Ján Palárik, František Víťazoslav Sasinek, Andrej Sládkovič, Daniel Gabriel Lichard, Ján Čipka, Juraj Slota, Andrej Kossa
Zdeno Chára, ice hockey player and former captain of Boston Bruins
Dominika Cibulková, Slovak tennis player
Ján Francisci-Rimavský poet, politician and revolutionary
Jozef Gabčík, Slovak soldier, Reinhard Heydrich assassin
Marek Hamšík, Slovak professional footballer and former captain of Napoli
Daniela Hantuchová, Slovak tennis player
Marián Hossa, ice hockey player and member of the Hockey Hall of Fame
Miroslav Iringh, one of the Warsaw Uprising organisers
Jana Kirschner, singer and songwriter
Stan Mikita, ice hockey player and member of the Hockey Hall of Fame
Peter Sagan, professional road bicycle racer and a world champion
Adriana Sklenaříková, fashion model and actress
Peter Šťastný, ice hockey player and member of the Hockey Hall of Fame
Viola Valachová, partisan
Slovaks in Vojvodina, Serbia (2002 census)
The language spread of Slovak in the United States according to U. S. Census 2000 and other resources interpreted by research of U. S. English Foundation, percentage of home speakers

The Slovaks (Slováci, singular: Slovák, feminine: Slovenka, plural: Slovenky) are a West Slavic ethnic group and nation native to Slovakia who share a common ancestry, culture, history and speak Slovak.

The Baptism of Poland. Detail from Jan Matejko's Christianization of Poland AD 966.

Poles

For a specific analysis of the population of Poland, see Demographics of Poland

For a specific analysis of the population of Poland, see Demographics of Poland

The Baptism of Poland. Detail from Jan Matejko's Christianization of Poland AD 966.
Fragment of Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum (1073) by Adam of Bremen, containing the name "Polans": "trans Oddaram sunt Polanos"
Book of Henryków. Highlighted in red is the earliest known sentence written in the Old Polish language
King Casimir III the Great welcomes the Jews to Poland (painting by Gerson, 1874).

Poles, or Polish people, are a West Slavic nation and ethnic group, who share a common history, culture, the Polish language and are identified with the country of Poland in Central Europe.

West Slavic ethnic groups, 9th to 10th centuries

Pomeranians (tribe)

West Slavic ethnic groups, 9th to 10th centuries
Without land. Pomeranians ousted by the Germans to the Baltic Islands by Wojciech Gerson, 1888, National Museum in Szczecin
Coat of arms of the House of Griffin

The Pomeranians (Pomoranen; Pòmòrzónie; Pomorzanie), first mentioned as such in the 10th century, were a West Slavic tribe, who since the 5th to 6th centuries had settled at the shore of the Baltic Sea between the mouths of the Oder and Vistula rivers (the latter Farther Pomerania and Pomerelia).

Kessinians

The Kessinians, also known as Kessini, Chizzini, Kcynianie and Chyżanie, were a medieval West Slavic tribe in what is now northeastern Germany.

East Slavs

The East Slavs are the most populous subgroup of the Slavs.

The East Slavs are the most populous subgroup of the Slavs.

A young girl of Slavic appearance in a Ukrainian folk costume, by Nikolay Rachkov
Maximum extent of European territory inhabited by the East Slavic tribes—predecessors of Kievan Rus', the first East Slavic state —in the 8th and 9th centuries.
Ethnic Russians in former Soviet Union states according to the most recent census
Three generations of a Russian family, c. 1910
Belarusians in traditional dress
Ukrainians in traditional dress
Russians in traditional dress of Vologda region
Bread and salt greeting ceremony in Vladivostok, Russia
Bread and salt greeting ceremony in Kyiv, Ukraine

By 600 AD, the Slavs had split linguistically into southern, western, and eastern branches.

Duchy of Bohemia, the early form of the Czech state pictured in the 11th century within the Holy Roman Empire

Czechs

Duchy of Bohemia, the early form of the Czech state pictured in the 11th century within the Holy Roman Empire
Czech traditional costumes
Areas where Czech language is spoken
Bedřich Smetana Among his Friends, 1865; oil painting by František Dvořák
The Slav Epic by Alfons Mucha
St. John of Nepomuk (Jan Nepomucký)
Greater coat of arms of the Czech Republic shows symbols of historical lands Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia
Predecessor to Protestantism, Jan Hus

The Czechs (Češi, ; singular masculine: Čech, singular feminine: Češka ), or the Czech people (Český lid), are a West Slavic ethnic group and a nation native to the Czech Republic in Central Europe, who share a common ancestry, culture, history, and the Czech language.

Map of the Slovene diaspora in the world

Slovenes

The Slovenes, also known as Slovenians (Slovenci ), are a South Slavic ethnic group native to Slovenia, and adjacent regions in Italy, Austria and Hungary.

The Slovenes, also known as Slovenians (Slovenci ), are a South Slavic ethnic group native to Slovenia, and adjacent regions in Italy, Austria and Hungary.

Map of the Slovene diaspora in the world
Peter Kozler's map of the Slovene Lands, designed during the Spring of Nations in 1848, became the symbol of the quest for a United Slovenia.
Socialist Republic of Slovenia within the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
Coat of arms of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia

The Slovenian population displays close genetic affiliations with West Slavic, Germanic and Italic populations.

Polish map of 1927 indicating location of Rusyns and Ukrainians (labelled Rusini) and Belarusians (Bialo Rusini)

Rusyns

East Slavic ethnic group from the Eastern Carpathians in Central Europe.

East Slavic ethnic group from the Eastern Carpathians in Central Europe.

Polish map of 1927 indicating location of Rusyns and Ukrainians (labelled Rusini) and Belarusians (Bialo Rusini)
Constitutional Law on the Autonomy of Subcarpathian Rus' (1938)
Carpatho-Ukraine in 1939
Stepan Klochurak
Map of territories occupied by Ruthenes in the Carpathian region near Huszt, Munkács, Ungvár
Sign reads "House of Subcarpathian Rusyns" (Dom Podkarpatskikh Rusinov) in Mukachevo
St Michael's Greek Catholic Church, Turja Pasika Transcarpathia Ukraine (built 1810)
Saints Peter & Paul Orthodox Church, Mokra Transcarpathia Ukraine
St Nicholas Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Church, Jacobs Creek Pennsylvania, USA
Four subgroups of Rusyns: Boykos, Dolinyans, Hutsuls, Lemkos
Pannonian Rusyns in Vojvodina, Serbia (2002 census)
Orthodox protest Greek Catholic Archbishop Kocisko's 1990 Uzhorod Cathedral visit
Boyko family, late 19th century
Boyko family, early 20th century
Hutsul family, 1925–1939
Hutsul music band, 1918–1935
Lemkos from Sanok in stylized highland folk-costumes from Mokre (Poland)
Rusyns from Przemyśl
Boykos from Prešov (left side) and Lemkos from Przemyśl
Ruthenian costume from Petrovci, Croatia

As residents of northeastern Carpathian regions, Rusyns are closely connected to and sometimes associated with other Slavic communities in the region, like the West Slavic highlander community of Gorals (literally 'Highlanders').

South Slavs

South Slavs are Slavic peoples who speak South Slavic languages and inhabit a contiguous region of Southeast Europe comprising the eastern Alps and the Balkan Peninsula.

South Slavs are Slavic peoples who speak South Slavic languages and inhabit a contiguous region of Southeast Europe comprising the eastern Alps and the Balkan Peninsula.

Admixture analysis of autosomal SNPs of the Balkan region in a global context on the resolution level of 7 assumed ancestral populations: the African (brown), South/West European (light blue), Asian (yellow), Middle Eastern (orange), South Asian (green), North/East European (dark blue) and beige Caucasus component.
Autosomal analysis presenting the historical contribution of different donor groups in some European populations. Polish sample was selected to represent the Slavic influence, and it is suggesting a strong and early impact in Greece (30-37%), Romania (48-57%), Bulgaria (55-59%), and Hungary (54-84%).

Geographically separated from the West Slavs and East Slavs by Austria, Hungary, Romania, and the Black Sea, the South Slavs today include Bosniaks, Bulgarians, Croats, Macedonians, Montenegrins, Serbs, and Slovenes, respectively the main populations of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Slovenia.