West Slavs

West Slav tribes in the 9th and 10th centuries
Reconstruction of the Slavic temple in Groß Raden
West Slavic languages

The West Slavs are a subgroup of Slavic peoples who speak the West Slavic languages.

- West Slavs

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Map showing an approximation location of Polish tribes according to the perspective of Polish historiography. Lendians (Lędzianie) are found at the bottom-right corner.

Lendians

The Lendians (Lędzianie) were a Lechitic tribe who lived in the area of East Lesser Poland and Cherven Cities between the 7th and 11th centuries.

The Lendians (Lędzianie) were a Lechitic tribe who lived in the area of East Lesser Poland and Cherven Cities between the 7th and 11th centuries.

Map showing an approximation location of Polish tribes according to the perspective of Polish historiography. Lendians (Lędzianie) are found at the bottom-right corner.
Cherven Cities, inhabited by the Lendians, as part of Poland under the rule of Mieszko I until 981 AD according to the perspective of Polish historiography.
Cherven Cities as part of Bohemian lands during the reign of Boleslaus II, Duke of Bohemia (967/972–999).

After these vacated the territory, the West Slavs (Lendians and Vistulans) moved in.

Burgwallinsel, a former Ukrian burgh on an isle in Lake Oberuckersee

Ukrani

Burgwallinsel, a former Ukrian burgh on an isle in Lake Oberuckersee

The Ukrani or Ukrians (Ukranen, Ukrer, Vukraner, Wkrzanie) were a West Slavic Polabian tribe in the Uckermark (terra U(c)kera, Uckerland) from the 6th–12th centuries.

Austria-Hungary

Constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918.

Constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918.

Silver coin: 5 corona, 1908 - The bust of Franz Joseph I facing right surrounded by the legend "Franciscus Iosephus I, Dei gratia, imperator Austriae, rex Bohemiae, Galiciae, Illyriae et cetera et apostolicus rex Hungariae"
Emperor Franz Joseph I in 1905
Electoral districts of Austria and Hungary in the 1880s. On the map opposition districts are marked in different shades of red, ruling party districts are in different shades of green, independent districts are in white.
Austrian Parliament building
Hungarian Parliament building
Emperor Franz Joseph I visiting Prague and opening the new Emperor Francis I Bridge in 1901
Kraków, a historical Polish city in the Austro-Hungarian Empire where in 1870 authorities allowed the use of the Polish language in the Jagiellonian University
Coronation of Francis Joseph I and Elisabeth Amalie at Matthias Church, Buda, 8 June 1867
Map of the counties of the Lands of the Crown of St. Stephen (Hungary proper and Croatia-Slavonia)
Circuits (Kreise) of Bosnia and Herzegovina: Banja Luka, Bihać, Mostar, Sarajevo, Travnik, Tuzla
Demonstration for universal right to vote in Prague, Bohemia, 1905
Bosnian Muslim resistance during the battle of Sarajevo in 1878 against the Austro-Hungarian occupation
Recruits from Bosnia-Herzegovina, including Muslim Bosniaks (31%), were drafted into special units of the Austro-Hungarian Army as early as 1879 and were commended for their bravery in service of the Austrian emperor, being awarded more medals than any other unit. The jaunty military march Die Bosniaken Kommen was composed in their honor by Eduard Wagnes.
Traditional clothing in Hungary, late 19th century
Traditional costumes of Tyrol
Parade in Prague, Kingdom of Bohemia, 1900
Romantic style Great Synagogue in Pécs, built by Neolog community in 1869
Religions in Austria–Hungary, from the 1881 edition of Andrees Allgemeiner Handatlas. Catholics (both Roman and Uniate) are blue, Protestants purple, Eastern Orthodox yellow, and Muslims green.
Funeral in Galicia by Teodor Axentowicz, 1882
Ethno-linguistic map of Austria–Hungary, 1910
Meyers Konversations-Lexikon ethnographic map of Austria–Hungary, 1885
Literacy in Austria–Hungary (census 1880)
Literacy in Hungary by counties in 1910 (excluding Croatia)
Physical map of Austria–Hungary in 1914
Orthodox Jews from Galicia in Leopoldstadt, Vienna, 1915
A 20-crown banknote of the Dual Monarchy, using all official and recognized languages (the reverse side was Hungarian)
Black Friday, 9 May 1873, Vienna Stock Exchange. The Panic of 1873 and Long Depression followed.
A stentor reading the day's news in the Telefonhírmondó of Budapest
Detailed railway map of Austrian and Hungarian railways from 1911
The start of construction of the underground in Budapest (1894–1896)
The SS Kaiser Franz Joseph I (12,567 t) of the Austro-Americana company was the largest passenger ship ever built in Austria. Because of its control over the coast of much of the Balkans, Austria–Hungary had access to several seaports.
Dubrovnik, Kingdom of Dalmatia
This picture of the arrest of a suspect in Sarajevo is usually associated with the capture of Gavrilo Princip, although some believe it depicts Ferdinand Behr, a bystander.
Crowds on the streets in the aftermath of the Anti-Serb riots in Sarajevo, 29 June 1914
MÁVAG armoured train in 1914
Franz Josef I and Wilhelm II
with military commanders during World War I
Siege of Przemyśl in 1915
Italian troops in Trento on 3 November 1918, after the Battle of Vittorio Veneto. Italy's victory marked the end of the war on the Italian Front and secured the dissolution of Austria–Hungary.
War memorial in Păuleni-Ciuc, Romania
The revolt of ethnic Czech units in Austria in May 1918 was brutally suppressed. It was considered a mutiny by the code of military justice.
The Treaty of Trianon: Kingdom of Hungary lost 72% of its land and 3.3 million people of Hungarian ethnicity.
Czechoslovak declaration of independence rally in Prague on Wenceslas Square, 28 October 1918

The Kingdom of Hungary and the First Austrian Republic were treated as its successors de jure, whereas the independence of the West Slavs and South Slavs of the Empire as the First Czechoslovak Republic, the Second Polish Republic, and the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, respectively, and most of the territorial demands of the Kingdom of Romania and the Kingdom of Italy were also recognized by the victorious powers in 1920.

West Slavs of the 9th–10th centuries

Polans (western)

West Slavs of the 9th–10th centuries
A fragment of the Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum (1073) by Adam of Bremen containing the name Polans – trans Oddaram sunt Polanos.

The Western Polans (also known as Polanes, Polanians; Polanie, derived from Old Slavic pole, "field" or "plain", from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- "flatland") were a West Slavic and Lechitic tribe, inhabiting the Warta River basin of the contemporary Greater Poland region starting in the 6th century.

Principality of Nitra

A map presenting the theory of the co-existence of two principalities (Moravia and Nitra) before the 830s
Modern sculpture of Pribina in Nitra
Nitra Castle - main gate
The "Duchy" (including its parts around Nitra) within the Kingdom of Hungary in the 11th century.

The Principality of Nitra (Nitrianske kniežatstvo, Nitriansko, Nitrava; Nyitrai Fejedelemség), also known as the Duchy of Nitra, was a West Slavic polity encompassing a group of settlements that developed in the 9th century around Nitra in present-day Slovakia.

Milsieni lands in the March of Meissen, Gustav Droysen, 1886

Milceni

Milsieni lands in the March of Meissen, Gustav Droysen, 1886

The Milceni or Milzeni (Milčané; Milzener; Milczanie) were a West Slavic tribe, who settled in the present-day Upper Lusatia region.

A map of the Billung March showing the location of the Warnabi.

Warnabi

A map of the Billung March showing the location of the Warnabi.

The Warnabi, Warnavi, Warnahi, Wranovi, Wranefzi, Wrani, Varnes, or Warnower were a West Slavic tribe of the Obotrite confederation in the ninth through eleventh centuries.

Great Moravia in the late 9th century

Great Moravia

Great Moravia in the late 9th century
Great Moravian sword from Blatnica, unearthed in the 19th century, originally interpreted as a burial equipment from a "ducal" mound
The core of Great Moravia
Principalities and lands within Great Moravia
Jewelry from a princely burial site at Kolín, 850–900 AD
Spherical gombiki from the Mikulčice Archaeological Park
Map of Moravia within East Francia in 814
A map presenting the theory of the co-existence of two principalities (Moravia and Nitra) before the 830s
Modern depiction of Rastislav as an Orthodox saint
Constantine and Methodius in Rome
Statue of Svatopluk I on Bratislava Castle, Slovakia
The papal bull Scire vos volumus of 879 addressed to Svatopluk
Icon of St Gorazd, a disciple of St Cyril and Method of Moravian origin, who was the designated successor of archbishop Method
Svatopluk I with three twigs and his three sons—Mojmír II, Svatopluk II and Predslav
Reconstruction of a Great Moravian gatehouse and ramparts in Thunau am Kamp, Austria
Foundations of a pre-Romanesque rotunda at the Great Moravian court in Ducové
Svatopluk I disguised as a monk in the court of Arnulf, King of East Francia (from the 14th-century Chronicle of Dalimil)
Church of St. Margaret of Antioch in Kopčany, Slovakia, one of remaining buildings for which the Great Moravian origin is considered
Stone foundations of a church in Valy u Mikulčic, Czech Republic
Exhibition Among the tribes and the state. Room with the Early medieval princely burial from Kolín (Starý Kolín), 850–900 AD
An example of the Glagolitic script created by Saint Cyril for the mission in Great Moravia (Baščanska ploča from Croatia). The inscribed stone slab records Croatian king Zvonimir's donation of a piece of land to a Benedictine abbey in the time of abbot Drzhiha.
A silver cross from Mikulčice

Great Moravia (Regnum Marahensium; Μεγάλη Μοραβία, Meghálī Moravía; ; Veľká Morava ; Wielkie Morawy), or simply Moravia, was the first major state that was predominantly West Slavic to emerge in the area of Central Europe, possibly including territories which are today part of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Austria, Germany, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine.

Last three Přemyslid kings according to illumination from the Chronicon Aulae regiae: Přemysl Ottokar II (one crown – Bohemia), Wenceslaus II (two crowns – Bohemia and Poland) and Wenceslaus III (three crowns – Hungary, Bohemia and Poland)

Přemyslid dynasty

Bohemian royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.

Bohemian royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.

Last three Přemyslid kings according to illumination from the Chronicon Aulae regiae: Přemysl Ottokar II (one crown – Bohemia), Wenceslaus II (two crowns – Bohemia and Poland) and Wenceslaus III (three crowns – Hungary, Bohemia and Poland)
Bohemian king Wenceslaus II as the King of Poland, a romantic drawing by Jan Matejko (1892)
Maximum extent of the kingdom under Ottokar II, c. 1276
Premyslid Dynasty Family Tree

The dynasty's origin dates back to the 9th century, when the Přemyslids ruled a tiny territory around Prague, populated by a tribe of the Western Slavs.