West Ukrainian People's Republic

West Ukrainian National RepublicWestern Ukrainian People's RepublicWest UkraineWestern Ukrainian National RepublicWestern Ukraineattempt at self-determinationUkrainian stateWestern Ukrainian RepublicZUNRindependent state
The West Ukrainian People's Republic (Західноукраїнська Народна Республіка, ZUNR) was a short-lived republic that existed from November 1918 to July 1919 in eastern Galicia.wikipedia
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Lviv

LwówLembergLvov
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia.
In 1918, for a short time, it was the capital of the West Ukrainian People's Republic.

Ivano-Frankivsk

StanisławówStanislauStanislaviv
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia.
After World War I, for several months, it served as a temporary capital of the West Ukrainian People's Republic.

Ukrainian National Council

legislative assemblyUkrainian National RadaUkrainian National Rada (Council)
Politically, the Ukrainian National Democratic Party (the precursor of the interwar Ukrainian National Democratic Alliance) dominated the legislative assembly, guided by varying degrees of Greek Catholic, liberal and socialist ideology.
Ukrainian National Council of West Ukrainian People's Republic (UNRada, until 13 November 1918 Ukrainian National Council – the representative body of Ukrainian of former Austro-Hungarian empire) – was the supreme legislative body of the West Ukrainian People's Republic (ZUNR).

Przemyśl

PrzemyslPeremyshlPeremyshl`
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia.
At the end of World War I, Przemyśl became disputed between renascent Poland and the West Ukrainian People's Republic.

Ternopil

TarnopolTernopolTarnopil
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia.
After the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the city was proclaimed as part of the West Ukrainian People's Republic on 11 November 1918.

Boryslav

BorysławBoryslawBoryslav Municipality
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia. Among the largest oil reserves in Europe were near Lviv at Drohobych and Boryslav in the upper Dniester River.
After the Great War the area became part of the new West Ukrainian People's Republic.

Carpathian Ruthenia

TranscarpathiaSubcarpathian RusSubcarpathian Ruthenia
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia.
After World War I, the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy collapsed and the region was briefly (in 1918 and 1919) claimed as part of the independent West Ukraine Republic.

Battle of Lemberg (1918)

Battle of LwówBattle of Lwów (1918)Battle of Lemberg
Shortly after the republic proclaimed independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire a popular uprising took place in Lviv, where most residents were Polish and did not want to be part of a non-Polish state.
The battle was fought between attacking forces of the West Ukrainian People's Republic and the local Polish civilian population, assisted later by regular Polish Army forces for the control over the city of Lviv (Lwów, Lemberg), in what was then eastern part of Galicia and now is western part of Ukraine.

Kolomyia

KołomyjaKolomyyaKolomea
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia.
As a result of the collapse of Austria-Hungary, both the town itself and the surrounding region became disputed between renascent Poland and the West Ukrainian People's Republic.

Bukovina

Northern BukovinaBucovinaBukovyna
It included the cities of Lviv, Przemyśl, Ternopil, Kolomyia, Boryslav and Stanislaviv (now Ivano-Frankivsk), and claimed parts of Bukovina and Carpathian Ruthenia.
Although local Ukrainians attempted to incorporate parts of northern Bukovina into the short-lived West Ukrainian People's Republic, this attempt was defeated by Polish and Romanian troops.

Polish–Ukrainian War

Polish-Ukrainian WarPolish-UkrainianUkrainian-Polish War
Thus the stage was set for conflict between the West Ukrainian People's Republic and Poland.
The Polish–Ukrainian War of November 1918 and 1919 was a conflict between the Second Polish Republic and Ukrainian forces (both the West Ukrainian People's Republic and Ukrainian People's Republic).

Act Zluky

Unification ActDay of Unity of Ukraineunification of Ukraine
This was mostly a symbolic act, however.
The Act Zluky (Акт Злуки, "Unification Act") was an agreement signed on 22 January 1919, by the Ukrainian People's Republic and the West Ukrainian People's Republic on the St Sophia Square in Kiev.

Ukrainian Galician Army

Galician ArmyUGAmilitary
Furthermore, western Ukrainians retained their own Ukrainian Galician Army and government structure.
Ukrainian Galician Army (Українська Галицька Армія, UHA), was the Ukrainian military of the West Ukrainian National Republic during and after the Polish-Ukrainian War.

Second Polish Republic

PolandPolishinterwar Poland
Thus the stage was set for conflict between the West Ukrainian People's Republic and Poland.
Soon afterward, the Polish–Ukrainian War broke out in Lwów (1 November 1918) between forces of the Military Committee of Ukrainians and the Polish irregular units made up of students known as the Lwów Eaglets, who were later supported by the Polish Army (see Battle of Lwów (1918), Battle of Przemyśl (1918)).

Galicia (Eastern Europe)

GaliciaGalicianHalychyna
The West Ukrainian People's Republic (Західноукраїнська Народна Республіка, ZUNR) was a short-lived republic that existed from November 1918 to July 1919 in eastern Galicia.
The local Ukrainian population briefly declared the independence of Eastern Galicia as the "West Ukrainian People's Republic".

Drohobych

DrohobyczDrogobychDrohobytsch
Among the largest oil reserves in Europe were near Lviv at Drohobych and Boryslav in the upper Dniester River.
After the World War I, the area became part of the short-lived independent West Ukrainian People's Republic(Zakhidnoukrayins’ka Narodna Respublyka; ZUNR).

Rusyns

RusynCarpatho-RusynRusyn people
Of these, 3,291,000 (approximately 60%) were Ukrainians, 1,351,000 (approximately 25%) were Poles, 660,000 (approximately 12%) were Jews, and the rest included Rusyns, Germans, Hungarians, Romanians, Czechs, Slovaks, Romani, Armenians and others.
Prior to this time, some of the founders of the Lemko-Rusyn Republic were sentenced to death or imprisoned in Talerhof by the prosecuting attorney Kost Levytsky (Ukrainian: Кость Леви́цький), future president of the West Ukrainian National Republic.

Ukrainian Radical Party

Ruthenian-Ukrainian Radical PartyUkrainian Socialist-Radical PartyRuthenian Radical Party
Other parties represented included the Ukrainian Radical Party and the Christian Social Party.
The Ukrainian Radical Party was one of the founding parties of the West Ukrainian National Republic, and its members occupied the posts of defence minister (Dmytro Vitovsky) and interior secretary within the West Ukrainian government.

Ukrainian National Democratic Alliance

Ukrainian National Democratic movementUkrainian National Democratic PartyUNDO
Politically, the Ukrainian National Democratic Party (the precursor of the interwar Ukrainian National Democratic Alliance) dominated the legislative assembly, guided by varying degrees of Greek Catholic, liberal and socialist ideology.
Prominent figures in the party included Kost Levytsky, former head of the government of the West Ukrainian National Republic, Dmytro Levytsky, who led the party for ten years, and Vasyl Mudry, who would become the speaker of Poland's parliament (the Sejm).

Christian Social Movement in Ukraine

Christian Social MovementChristian Social PartyCatholic Ruthenian-Social Union
Other parties represented included the Ukrainian Radical Party and the Christian Social Party.
After Austria-Hungary's collapse, the Christian Social Party subsequently participated in the formation of the West Ukrainian People's Republic.

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
Several Ukrainian states briefly emerged: the internationally recognized Ukrainian People's Republic (UNR, the predecessor of modern Ukraine, was declared on 23 June 1917 proclaimed at first as a part of the Russian Republic; after the Bolshevik Revolution, the Ukrainian People's Republic proclaimed its independence on 25 January 1918), the Hetmanate, the Directorate and the pro-Bolshevik Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (or Soviet Ukraine) successively established territories in the former Russian Empire; while the West Ukrainian People's Republic and the Hutsul Republic emerged briefly in the Ukrainian lands of former Austro-Hungarian territory.

Ukrainian People's Army

UNR ArmyArmy of the Ukrainian National RepublicArmy of the Ukrainian People's Republic
Likewise, the West Ukrainian troops were more disciplined while those of Kiev's Ukrainian People's Army were more chaotic and prone to committing pogroms, something actively opposed by the western Ukrainians.
Simultaneously, the West Ukrainian People's Republic had taken Lviv, thereby beginning a war with the Second Polish Republic.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
Shortly after the republic proclaimed independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire a popular uprising took place in Lviv, where most residents were Polish and did not want to be part of a non-Polish state. According to the Austro-Hungarian census of 1910, the territory claimed by the West Ukrainian People's Republic had about 5.4 million people.

Lemko Republic

Lemko-Rusyn RepublicLemkoLemko Rusyn People's Republic
Being Russophile, its intent was unification with a democratic Russia and was opposed to a union with the West Ukrainian People's Republic.

State Secretariat of West Ukrainian People's Republic

State SecretariatState Secretariat of the West Ukrainian People's RepublicState Secretary
Subordinated to him was the State Secretariat, whose members included Kost Levytsky (president of the secretariat and the Republic's minister of finance), Dmytro Vitovsky (head of the armed forces), Lonhyn Tsehelsky (secretary of internal affairs), and Oleksander Barvinsky (secretary of education and religious affairs), among others.
State Secretariat of West Ukrainian People's Republic (WUPR, ZUNR) — the highest executive and administrative body WUPR, the government of the republic.