A report on West Virginia

Thomas Lee, the first manager of the Ohio Company of Virginia
A slave wedding in Virginia, 1838
Map of Virginia dated June 13, 1861, featuring the percentage of slave population within each county at the 1860 census and the proposed state of Kanawha
Francis H. Pierpont, a leader during the Second Wheeling Convention.
Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight, a statue on the grounds of the West Virginia State Capitol
Harpers Ferry alternated between Confederate and Union rule eight times during the American Civil War, and was finally annexed by West Virginia.
Votes by county in the October 1861 statehood vote
Child labor in the coal mines of West Virginia, 1908.
Family of a coal miner, circa 1935
Saturday afternoon street scene, Welch, McDowell County, 1946
Map of West Virginia counties
Shaded relief map of the Cumberland Plateau and Ridge-and-valley Appalachians
The summit of Spruce Knob is often covered in clouds.
Köppen climate types of West Virginia, using 1991-2020 climate normals
West Virginia population density map
Seneca Rocks, Pendleton County
Bituminous coal seam in southwestern West Virginia
Bluefield, a major center for coal mining, in 2014
The West Virginia State Capitol in Charleston is home to the West Virginia Legislature.
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A toll plaza on the West Virginia Turnpike
The iconic New River Gorge Bridge near Fayetteville
The Veterans Memorial Bridge carries US 22 from Steubenville into Ohio.

State in the Appalachian, Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States.

- West Virginia

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Virginia

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State in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States, between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

State in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States, between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

The story of Pocahontas was romanticized by later artists, in part because of her association with the First Families of Virginia.
Williamsburg was Virginia's capital from 1699 to 1780.
1851 painting of Patrick Henry's speech before the House of Burgesses on the Virginia Resolves against the Stamp Act of 1765
Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy from 1861 to 1865, when it was partially burned by them prior to its recapture by Union forces.
Many World War I-era warships were built in Newport News, including the USS Virginia.
Protests in 2020 were focused on the Confederate monuments in the state.
Virginia is shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, and the parallel 36°30′ north.
Great Falls is on the fall line of the Potomac River, and its rocks date to the late Precambrian.
Oak trees in particular produce a haze of isoprene, which helps gives the Blue Ridge Mountains their signature color.
White-tailed deer are also known as Virginia deer, and up to seven thousand live in Shenandoah National Park.
Population density of Virginia counties and cities in 2020
New citizens attend a naturalization ceremony in Northern Virginia, where 25% of residents are foreign-born, almost twice the overall state average
Since 1927, Arlington National Cemetery has hosted an annual nondenominational sunrise service every Easter.
Virginia counties and cities by median household income (2010)
The Department of Defense is headquartered in Arlington at the Pentagon, the world's largest office building.
Ocean tourism is an important sector of Virginia Beach's economy.
Rockingham County accounts for twenty percent of Virginia's agricultural sales.
Colonial Virginian culture, language, and style are reenacted in Williamsburg.
Americana Roots Folk Rock band The Steel Wheels play at the Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville
The annual Pony Penning features more than two hundred wild ponies swimming across the Assateague Channel into Chincoteague.
USA Today, the nation's most circulated newspaper, has its headquarters in McLean.
Virginia's public schools serve over a million students at over 2,200 schools.
The University of Virginia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, guarantees full tuition scholarships to all in-state students from families earning up to $80,000.
Patients are screened for COVID-19 outside Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, the Navy's oldest continuously operating hospital.
The Silver Line extension of the Washington Metro system opened in Tysons Corner in 2014.
The Virginia State Capitol, designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clérisseau, is home to the Virginia General Assembly.
Unlike the federal system, justices of the Virginia Supreme Court have term limits and a mandatory retirement age, and select their own Chief Justice.
Mirroring Virginia's political transition, the annual Shad Planking event in Wakefield has evolved from a vestige of the Byrd era into a regular stop for many state campaigns.
Republicans gained seven seats (red) in the 2021 General Assembly elections.
Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, Virginia's two U.S. Senators, are both former governors.
The annual Monument Avenue 10K in Richmond has become one of the ten largest timed races in the U.S.
Mike Scott and Joe Harris of the Virginia Cavaliers battle Cadarian Raines of the Virginia Tech Hokies for a rebound at Cassell Coliseum
The state slogan, "Virginia is for Lovers", has been used since 1969 and is featured on the state's welcome signs.

During the American Civil War, Virginia was split when the state government in Richmond joined the Confederacy, but many of the state's northwestern counties wanted to remain with the Union, helping form the state of West Virginia in 1863.

Kentucky

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State in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South.

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace near Hodgenville
A map of Kentucky
Kentucky's regions (click on image for color-coding information)
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Lake Cumberland is the largest artificial American lake east of the Mississippi River by volume.
Once an industrial wasteland, Louisville's reclaimed waterfront now features thousands of trees and miles of walking trails.
Red River Gorge is one of Kentucky's most visited places.
Forest at Otter Creek Outdoor Recreation Area, Meade County, Kentucky
Kentucky Population Density Map
Lexington Theological Seminary (then College of the Bible), 1904
The best selling car in the United States, the Toyota Camry, is manufactured in Georgetown, Kentucky.
The best selling truck in the United States, the Ford F-Series, is manufactured in Louisville, Kentucky.
The Ark Encounter in Williamstown, KY
Spring running of Keeneland in Lexington, KY
William T. Young Library at the University of Kentucky, Kentucky's flagship university.
The J.B. Speed School of Engineering at the University of Louisville, Kentucky's urban research university.
At 484 mi long, Kentucky Route 80 is the longest route in Kentucky, pictured here west of Somerset.
High Bridge over the Kentucky River was the tallest rail bridge in the world when it was completed in 1877.
A barge hauling coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only manmade section of the Ohio River
The governor's mansion in Frankfort
The Kentucky State Capitol building in Frankfort
A map showing Kentucky's six congressional districts
State sign, Interstate 65
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Buffalo Trace Distillery
Old Louisville is the largest Victorian Historic neighborhood in the United States.
The U.S. 23 Country Music Highway Museum in Paintsville provides background on the country music artists from Eastern Kentucky.
The Hot Brown
Kentucky's Churchill Downs hosts the Kentucky Derby.

Kentucky borders Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio to the north; West Virginia and Virginia to the east; Tennessee to the south; and Missouri to the west.

Maryland

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State in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

State in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

Cecil Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, 1st Proprietor of the Maryland colony
1732 map of Maryland
The bombardment of Fort McHenry in Baltimore inspired the song, "Star Spangled Banner".
The Battle of Antietam was the single bloodiest day of the Civil War with nearly 23,000 casualties.
Ruin left by the Great Baltimore Fire
Physical regions of Maryland
Western Maryland is known for its heavily forested mountains. A panoramic view of Deep Creek Lake and the surrounding Appalachian Mountains in Garrett County.
Great Falls on the Potomac River
Typical freshwater river above the tidal zone. The Patapsco River includes the famous Thomas Viaduct and is part of the Patapsco Valley State Park. Later, the river forms Baltimore's Inner Harbor as it empties into the Chesapeake Bay.
Typical brackish tidal river. Sunset over a marsh at Cardinal Cove on the Patuxent River
Tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States and the largest water feature in Maryland
Black-eyed susans, the state flower, grow throughout much of the state.
Mature Trachycarpus fortunei in Solomons, Maryland
On Maryland's Atlantic coastal islands: A feral Chincoteague Pony on Assateague
Köppen climate types of Maryland, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Winter in Baltimore, Lancaster Street, Fells Point
Maryland's counties
Maryland population distribution map. Maryland's population is concentrated mostly in the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas.
The Baltimore Basilica was the first Catholic cathedral built in the U.S.
The Murugan Temple of North America (Hindu) in Lanham, Maryland
A map showing Maryland's median income by county. Data is sourced from the 2014 ACS 5-year Estimate report published by the US Census Bureau.
Agriculture is an important part of the state's economy
The beach resort town of Ocean City along the Atlantic Ocean is a popular tourist destination in Maryland.
The Chesapeake Bay Bridge connects Maryland's Eastern and Western Shores.
Ellicott City Station, on the original B&O Railroad line, is the oldest remaining passenger station in the United States. The rail line is still used by CSX Transportation for freight trains, and the station is now a museum.
The Maryland State House in Annapolis dates to 1772, and houses the Maryland General Assembly and offices of the governor.
The historical coat of arms of Maryland in 1876
Spiro Agnew, 39th Vice President of the United States, is the highest-ranking political leader from Maryland since the founding of the United States.
Memorial Chapel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland's flagship university
UMBC Commons and Quad
Oriole Park at Camden Yards, home of the Baltimore Orioles
M&T Bank Stadium, home of the Baltimore Ravens
The Battle of Antietam was the single bloodiest day of the Civil War with nearly 23,000 casualties.

It shares borders with Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware and the Atlantic Ocean to its east.

Pennsylvania

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U.S. state spanning the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, and Appalachian regions of the United States.

U.S. state spanning the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, and Appalachian regions of the United States.

William Penn, a Quaker and son of a prominent admiral, founded Pennsylvania in 1681
Shelter House in Emmaus, constructed in 1734 by Pennsylvania German settlers, is believed to be the oldest continuously occupied building structure in the Lehigh Valley and one of the oldest in Pennsylvania.
Independence Hall in Philadelphia, where the United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were drafted and adopted in 1776 and 1787-88, respectively.
The July 1-3, 1863 Battle of Gettysburg in Gettysburg, which was a turning point in the Union Army's ultimate victory in the American Civil War, is depicted in this 1887 Thure de Thulstrup painting. Gettysburg was the Civil War's deadliest battle with 51,118 total casualties.
On November 19, 1863, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln (center, facing camera) arrived in Gettysburg and delivered the Gettysburg Address, considered one of the best-known speeches in American history.
Hazleton coal miners in 1900. Coal mining was a major economic activity in Pennsylvania in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Anti-nuclear protest in Harrisburg following the March 28, 1979 Three Mile Island accident in Londonderry Township, September 1979
The crash site of Flight 93 in Somerset County following the September 11 attacks
South Mountain with Allentown in the foreground, December 2010
Worlds End State Park in Sullivan County, June 2008
Köppen climate types in Pennsylvania
Autumn in North Branch Township in Wyoming County, October 2011
Allentown, the state's third largest city, May 2010
Pennsylvania jurist John Morton (1725–1777) was one of nine Pennsylvanians, the most of any of the Thirteen Colonies, to sign the Declaration of Independence. Other Pennsylvanians to sign the Declaration include George Clymer, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Morris, George Ross, Benjamin Rush, James Smith, George Taylor, and James Wilson.
Pennsylvania's population growth from 1790 to 2000
Pennsylvania's population distribution as of the 2000 census
An Amish family riding in a traditional Amish buggy in Lancaster County, May 2004
Bethlehem Steel in Bethlehem was one of the world's leading steel manufacturers for most of the 19th and 20th century. In 1982, it discontinued most of its operations, declared bankruptcy in 2001, and was dissolved in 2003.
Geo map of average income by location in Pennsylvania. Data shown is from the 2014 American Community Survey five-year estimate.
Wind Creek Bethlehem casino in Bethlehem, March 2014
Pennsylvania's 67 counties
The Pennsylvania State Capitol, built in 1906 in Harrisburg, June 2020
South Philadelphia High School on Broad Street in South Philadelphia, February 2010
Benjamin Franklin statue on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League institution in Philadelphia and one of the top universities in the world, August 2007
Dorney Park and Wildwater Kingdom's Steel Force and Thunderhawk roller coasters in Allentown. Steel Force is the tenth longest steel rollercoaster in the world.
Road and rail map of Pennsylvania
U.S. Route 220 as it passes through Lamar Township, August 2010
30th Street Station in Philadelphia, Amtrak's third busiest train station in the nation, July 2016
The Pennsylvanian navigating the historic Horseshoe Curve near Altoona, May 2013
Philadelphia International Airport is the busiest airport in Pennsylvania and the 21st busiest overall in the United States
The Philadelphia Eagles are presented with the Vince Lombardi Trophy after winning Super Bowl LII, February 4, 2018
Citizens Bank Park in South Philadelphia, home of the Philadelphia Phillies, May 2009
NASCAR racing at Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, September 2006
Beaver Stadium, a 106,572 capacity stadium in University Park, is the home field of the Penn State Nittany Lions.
Geno's Steaks in South Philadelphia is widely credited with inventing the cheesesteak in 1933.
Hershey Chocolate Factory in Hershey, August 1976

It borders Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and the Delaware River and New Jersey to the east.

Charleston, West Virginia

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Zero Milestone
Charleston Town Center
Capitol Street in downtown Charleston
Kanawha River in downtown Charleston
Picture of Charleston and surroundings by the ISS
Photograph of Charleston West Virginia taken from the International Space Station (ISS)
Map of Charleston and vicinity
Charleston City Hall, West Virginia, in 2009
Downtown
Kanawha County Courthouse
Yeager Airport
The Elk River near its mouth in Charleston in 2001.
Interstate 64 crosses through downtown Charleston on a viaduct.

Charleston is the capital and most populous city of West Virginia.

Ohio

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State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

Artists conception of the Fort Ancient SunWatch Indian Village in Dayton.
Iroquois conquests during the Beaver Wars (mid-1600s), which largely depopulated the upper and mid-Ohio River valley.
The Ohio Country indicating battle sites between American settlers and indigenous tribes, 1775–1794.
Rufus Putnam by James Sharples, Jr., 1797
Battle of Lake Erie by William Henry Powell.
The route of Morgan's Raid.
The first Standard Oil refinery was opened in Cleveland by businessman John D. Rockefeller.
Iron being converted to steel for wartime efforts at Youngstown's Republic Steel in 1941.
Geographic regions of Ohio.
Map of Ohio cities and rivers.
Köppen climate types of Ohio, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Ohio population density map.
Amish children on their way to school
Cincinnati's Procter & Gamble is one of Ohio's largest companies in terms of revenue.
Cincinnati light rail
The Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, home to the Ohio General Assembly.
The Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center holds the Supreme Court of Ohio.
Presidential election results by county for 2020
University Hall at the Ohio State University in Columbus.
Bosworth Hall at Oberlin College in northeast Ohio.
Springer Auditorium at the Cincinnati Music Hall.
Progressive Field, home to the Cleveland Guardians baseball team
Ohio Stadium in Columbus, home to the Ohio State Buckeyes football team, is the fifth largest stadium in the world.
Population growth by county in Ohio between the 2010 and 2020 censuses. -10 to -5 percent
-5 to -2 percent
-2 to 0 percent
0 to 2 percent
2 to 5 percent
5 to 10 percent
10 to 20 percent
More than 20 percent

Ohio is bordered by Lake Erie to the north, Pennsylvania to the east, West Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, Indiana to the west, and Michigan to the northwest.

Detail of Diego Gutiérrez's 1562 map of the Western Hemisphere, showing the first known use of a variation of the place name "Appalachia" ("Apalchen") – from the map Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio

Appalachian Mountains

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The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America.

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America.

Detail of Diego Gutiérrez's 1562 map of the Western Hemisphere, showing the first known use of a variation of the place name "Appalachia" ("Apalchen") – from the map Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio
Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia
Bald Mountains seen from Tennessee
Shaded relief map of the Cumberland Plateau and Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians on the Virginia–West Virginia border
Old fault exposed by roadcut near Hazleton, Pennsylvania, along Interstate 81, such faults are common in the folded Appalachians
Cliffs overlooking the New River near Gauley Bridge, West Virginia
Paleogeographic reconstruction showing the Appalachian Basin area during the Middle Devonian period
USGS Appalachian zones in the United States
View from Mount Mitchell, North Carolina, at 6684 ft the highest peak east of the Mississippi River
Shenandoah National Park in Virginia
The view from Craggy Gardens on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina
Great laurel thicket in the Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina
Cranberry Glades, a bog preserve in West Virginia
Grassy balds on the Roan Highlands straddling the North Carolina/Tennessee border
Alpine tundra on Mount Washington, high point of the White Mountains of New Hampshire
Southern flying squirrel
Male eastern wild turkey

The term is often used more restrictively to refer to regions in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains, usually including areas in the states of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, and North Carolina, as well as sometimes extending as far south as northern Alabama, Georgia and western South Carolina, and as far north as Pennsylvania, southern and east central Ohio, Lower New York and the Southern Tier region of New York.

Ohio River

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981 mi long river in the United States.

981 mi long river in the United States.

Steamboat Morning Star, a Louisville and Evansville mail packet, in 1858.
Built between 1847 and 1849, the Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge across the river and a crucial part of the National Road.
Cave-in-rock, view on the Ohio (circa 1832, Cave-In-Rock, Illinois): aquatint by Karl Bodmer from the book Maximilian, Prince of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America, during the years 1832–1834
Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant, West Virginia which collapsed into the Ohio River on December 15, 1967, killing 46 people.
A barge heads east on the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky.
The confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers is at Cairo, Illinois.
The Ohio River as seen from Fredonia, Indiana.
Natural-color satellite image of the Wabash-Ohio confluence.
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, is one of many towns that use the Ohio as a shipping avenue.
Glacial Lake Ohio
The Allegheny River, left, and Monongahela River join to form the Ohio River at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the largest metropolitan area on the river.
Louisville, Kentucky, The deepest point of the Ohio River is a scour hole just below Cannelton locks and dam (river mile 720.7).
A barge hauls coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only artificial portion of the Ohio River.
Cincinnati skyline showing the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge to Covington, Kentucky.
Carl Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right.
The Ohio River seen at Sciotoville, from the "Geography of Ohio," 1923

In his original draft of the Land Ordinance of 1784, Thomas Jefferson proposed a new state called "Pelisipia", to the south of the Ohio River, which would have included parts of present-day Eastern Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia.

Potomac River

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The Potomac River drains the Mid-Atlantic United States, flowing from the Potomac Highlands into Chesapeake Bay.

The Potomac River drains the Mid-Atlantic United States, flowing from the Potomac Highlands into Chesapeake Bay.

The Potomac River in Washington, D.C., with Arlington Memorial Bridge in the foreground and Rosslyn, Arlington, Virginia in the background
Map showing the five geological provinces through which the Potomac River flows
The North Branch between Cumberland, Maryland, and Ridgeley, West Virginia, in 2007
Canoers at Hanging Rocks on the South Branch in the 1890s
Confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah at Harpers Ferry
View southwest across the tidal Potomac River from the south end of Cobb Island Road on Cobb Island, Charles County, Maryland
Captain John Smith's 1608 map
Tundra swans were the predominant species of swan on the Potomac River when the Algonquian tribes dwelled along its shores, and continue to be the most populous variety today.
View of the Potomac River from George Washington's birthplace in Westmoreland County, Virginia
Sunset over the Potomac near Mount Vernon
Map of the Potomac River and its environs circa 1862 by Robert Knox Sneden.
The Potomac River surges over the deck of Chain Bridge during the historic 1936 flood. The bridge was so severely damaged by the raging water, and the debris it carried, that its superstructure had to be re-built; the new bridge was opened to traffic in 1939. (This photograph was taken from a vantage point on Glebe Road in Arlington County, Virginia. The houses on the bluffs in the background are located on the Potomac Palisades of Washington, DC.)
Eutrophication in the Potomac River is evident from this bright green water in Washington, D.C., caused by a dense bloom of cyanobacteria, April 2012
This chart displays the Annual Mean Discharge of the Potomac River measured at Little Falls, Maryland for Water Years 1931–2017 (in cubic feet per second). Source of data: USGS
Map of land use in the watershed
After an absence lasting many decades, the American Shad has recently returned to the Potomac.
Several hundred bottle-nosed dolphins live six months of the year (from mid-April through mid-October) in the Potomac. Depicted here, a mother with her young.
Eastern Box Turtles are frequently spotted along the towpath of the C&O Canal.
Five-lined skink, juvenile
The South Branch near South Branch Depot, West Virginia
Confluence of the Cacapon River (barely visible) with the Potomac
Oblique air photo, facing southwest, of the Potomac River flowing through water gaps in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Virginia on the left, Maryland on the right, West Virginia in upper right, including Harpers Ferry (partially obscured by Maryland Heights of Elk Ridge Mountain) at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers.
Potomac River at Goose Creek
The Great Falls of the Potomac, viewed from the Virginia bank of the river (Engraving based on an aquatint drawn by George Jacob Beck in 1802)
View of the Potomac River, Analostan Island, Georgetown, and, in the distance, buildings of the nascent City of Washington. (Engraving based on an 1801 watercolor by George Jacob Beck)
Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C., viewed from across the Tidal Basin of the Potomac
The Pentagon, looking northeast with the Potomac in the distance
East Branch of the Potomac (now called the Anacostia River) near its confluence with the mainstem Potomac in Washington. (Watercolor drawn in 1839 by Augustus Kollner)
View of the Potomac from Mount Vernon
Potomac River seen while landing at Reagan National Airport
View northeast down the North Branch Potomac River from the Gorman-Gormania Bridge (U.S. Route 50) between Gormania, Grant County, West Virginia and Gorman, Garrett County, Maryland
The North Branch Potomac River near Piedmont, WV
The South Branch Potomac River near South Branch Depot, WV
The South Branch of the Potomac River at Millesons Mill, WV
Potomac River Watershed in West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Maryland

The river forms part of the borders between Maryland and Washington, D.C. on the left descending bank and between West Virginia and Virginia on the right descending bank.

Washington, D.C.

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Capital city and federal district of the United States.

Capital city and federal district of the United States.

Looking West at the Capitol & the Mall, Washington DC
Historical coat of arms, as recorded in 1876
Following their victory at the Battle of Bladensburg (1814), the British entered Washington, D.C., burning down buildings, including the White House.
President Abraham Lincoln insisted that construction of the United States Capitol dome continue during the American Civil War (1861).
Crowds surrounding the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool during the March on Washington, 1963
Satellite photo of Washington, D.C. by ESA
The Washington Monument, seen across the Tidal Basin during 2007's National Cherry Blossom Festival
The L'Enfant Plan for Washington, D.C., as revised by Andrew Ellicott in 1792
Looking Northwest at the Mall, Washington DC
Looking West from RFK Stadium, Washington DC
Construction of the 12-story Cairo Apartment Building (1894) in the Dupont Circle neighborhood spurred building height restrictions.
The Georgetown neighborhood is known for its historic Federal-style rowhouses. In the foreground is the 19th century Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.
Meridian Hill Park, in Columbia Heights
Map of racial distribution in Washington, D.C., according to the 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
D.C. police on Harley-Davidson motorcycles escort a protest in 2018.
Federal Triangle, between Constitution Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue. The U.S. federal government accounts for about 29% of D.C. jobs.
The Lincoln Memorial receives about six million visits annually.
The Smithsonian Institution is the world's largest research and museum complex. Like its administration building, known as The Castle, many of its museums are on the National Mall.
The National Gallery of Art
The Kennedy Center for Performing Arts is home to the Washington National Opera and National Symphony Orchestra.
Nationals Park in the Navy Yard area on the Anacostia River
is the home of the Washington Nationals baseball team.
The hometown Washington Capitals NHL hockey team plays in Penn Quarter's Capital One Arena; the arena is also home to the Washington Wizards NBA basketball team.
One Franklin Square: The Washington Post Building on Franklin Square
The Watergate complex was the site of the Watergate Scandal, which led to President Nixon's resignation.
The John A. Wilson Building houses the offices of the mayor of Washington and the Council of the District of Columbia.
The Eisenhower Executive Office Building, once the world's largest office building, houses the Executive Office of the President of the United States.
The Library of Congress is one of the world's largest libraries, with more than 167 million cataloged items.
Georgetown Day at Georgetown University
A Blue Line train at Farragut West, an underground station on the Washington Metro
Washington Union Station is one of the busiest rail stations in the United States.
I-66 in Washington, D.C.
The Capitol Power Plant, built to supply energy for the U.S. Capitol Complex, is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol.

Washington's metropolitan area, the country's sixth-largest (including parts of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia), had a 2019 estimated population of 6.3 million residents.