West Wing

In Celebration of the Centennial of the West Wing of the White House, 2002
The West Wing of the White House houses the offices of the President of the United States.wikipedia
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White House

The White HousePresident's HouseExecutive Mansion
The West Wing of the White House houses the offices of the President of the United States.
Because of crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had all work offices relocated to the newly constructed West Wing in 1901.

Oval Office

Bow WindowEric Gugleroffice
The West Wing contains the Oval Office, the Cabinet Room, the Situation Room, and the Roosevelt Room.
The Oval Office is the working office space of the President of the United States located in the West Wing of the White House, Washington, D.C..

Situation Room

White House Situation Room
The West Wing contains the Oval Office, the Cabinet Room, the Situation Room, and the Roosevelt Room.
The Situation Room, officially known as the John F. Kennedy Conference Room, is a 5525 sqft conference room and intelligence management center in the basement of the West Wing of the White House.

Roosevelt Room

Fish Room
The West Wing contains the Oval Office, the Cabinet Room, the Situation Room, and the Roosevelt Room.
The Roosevelt Room is a meeting room in the West Wing of the White House, the home and main workplace of the President of the United States.

Cabinet Room (White House)

Cabinet Rooma room adjacent to the Oval OfficeWhite House cabinet room
The West Wing contains the Oval Office, the Cabinet Room, the Situation Room, and the Roosevelt Room.
The Cabinet Room is located in the West Wing of the White House, adjoining the Oval Office, and looks out upon the White House Rose Garden.

Executive Residence

State FloorSecond FloorExecutive Residence at the White House
Adjoining the press secretary's office, in the colonnade between the West Wing and the Executive Residence is the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room along with work space for the White House press corps.
The Executive Residence is the central building of the White House complex located between the East Wing and West Wing.

White House press corps

White House correspondentpress corpscorrespondent
Adjoining the press secretary's office, in the colonnade between the West Wing and the Executive Residence is the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room along with work space for the White House press corps.
Their offices are located in the West Wing.

Executive Office of the President of the United States

Executive Office of the PresidentWhite HouseSpecial Assistant to the President
Today, most of the staff members of the Executive Office of the President are located in the adjacent Eisenhower Executive Office Building.
It consists of several offices and agencies, such as the White House Office (the staff working directly for and reporting to the President, including West Wing staff and the President’s closest advisers), National Security Council or Office of Management and Budget.

Eric Gugler

Dissatisfied with the size and layout of President Hoover's West Wing, he engaged New York architect Eric Gugler to redesign it in 1933.
Dissatisfied with the size and layout of the West Wing, President Franklin D. Roosevelt engaged Gugler to redesign it in 1933.

Edith Roosevelt

Edith Kermit CarowEdithEdith Carow Roosevelt
A year later in 1902, First Lady Edith Roosevelt hired McKim, Mead & White to separate the living quarters from the offices, to enlarge and modernize the public rooms, to re-do the landscaping, and to redecorate the interior.
The new West Wing housed offices while the East Wing housed the First Family and guests.

Vice President of the United States

Vice Presidentvice presidentialU.S. Vice President
The West Wing's four floors contain offices for the Vice President, White House Chief of Staff, the Counselor to the President, the Senior Advisor to the President, the White House Press Secretary, and their support staffs.
President Jimmy Carter was the first president to give his vice president, Walter Mondale, an office in the West Wing of the White House, which all vice presidents have since retained.

McKim, Mead & White

McKim, Mead and WhiteMcKim, Mead, and WhiteCharles Follen McKim
A year later in 1902, First Lady Edith Roosevelt hired McKim, Mead & White to separate the living quarters from the offices, to enlarge and modernize the public rooms, to re-do the landscaping, and to redecorate the interior.

James S. Brady Press Briefing Room

press briefing roomWhite House Briefing RoomWhite House press briefing
Adjoining the press secretary's office, in the colonnade between the West Wing and the Executive Residence is the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room along with work space for the White House press corps.
The James S. Brady Press Briefing Room is a small theater in the West Wing of the White House where the White House Press Secretary gives briefings to the news media and the President of the United States sometimes addresses the press and the nation.

Harry S. Truman

TrumanHarry TrumanPresident Truman
It is located underneath the Oval Office, and was established by President Truman on June 11, 1951.
As the newer West Wing, including the Oval Office, remained open, Truman walked to and from his work across the street each morning and afternoon.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. Presidentpresidential
The West Wing of the White House houses the offices of the President of the United States.

White House Chief of Staff

Chief of StaffChief of Staff to the PresidentWhite House Chiefs of Staff
The West Wing's four floors contain offices for the Vice President, White House Chief of Staff, the Counselor to the President, the Senior Advisor to the President, the White House Press Secretary, and their support staffs.

Counselor to the President

CounselorSenior CounselorSenior Counselor to the President
The West Wing's four floors contain offices for the Vice President, White House Chief of Staff, the Counselor to the President, the Senior Advisor to the President, the White House Press Secretary, and their support staffs.

Senior Advisor to the President of the United States

Senior AdvisorSenior Advisor to the PresidentSenior Advisors to the President
The West Wing's four floors contain offices for the Vice President, White House Chief of Staff, the Counselor to the President, the Senior Advisor to the President, the White House Press Secretary, and their support staffs.

White House Press Secretary

Press SecretaryWhite HouseWhite House press office
The West Wing's four floors contain offices for the Vice President, White House Chief of Staff, the Counselor to the President, the Senior Advisor to the President, the White House Press Secretary, and their support staffs.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltRooseveltPresident Theodore Roosevelt
However, when Theodore Roosevelt became president, he found that the existing offices in the mansion were insufficient to accommodate his family of six children as well as his staff.

William Howard Taft

TaftWilliam H. TaftPresident Taft
In 1909, William Howard Taft expanded the building southward, covering the tennis court.

Herbert Hoover

HooverPresident HooverPresident Herbert Hoover
Later, at the outset of his presidency, Herbert Hoover rebuilt the West Wing, excavating a partial basement, and supporting it with structural steel.

Eisenhower Executive Office Building

State, War, and Navy BuildingExecutive Office BuildingOld Executive Office Building
Today, most of the staff members of the Executive Office of the President are located in the adjacent Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

Richard Nixon

NixonPresident NixonRichard M. Nixon
Richard Nixon also renamed the room, previously called by Franklin Roosevelt the "Fish Room" (where he kept aquariums, and where John F. Kennedy displayed trophy fish) in honor of the two Presidents Roosevelt: Theodore, who first built the West Wing, and Franklin, who built the current Oval Office.

Aquarium

aquariaaquariumsfish tank
Richard Nixon also renamed the room, previously called by Franklin Roosevelt the "Fish Room" (where he kept aquariums, and where John F. Kennedy displayed trophy fish) in honor of the two Presidents Roosevelt: Theodore, who first built the West Wing, and Franklin, who built the current Oval Office.