Whale vocalization

whale songwhale songswhale callloudest sounds made by marine animalssongvocalizationsWhale soundwhalessongsacoustic displays
Whale sounds are used by whales for different kinds of communication.wikipedia
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Cetacea

cetaceancetaceanswhales
The mechanisms used to produce sound vary from one family of cetaceans to another.
Male cetacean strategies for reproductive success vary between herding females, defending potential mates from other males, or whale song which attracts mates.

Animal communication

communicationvocalizationsvocalization
Whale sounds are used by whales for different kinds of communication.
Whale vocalizations have been found to have different dialects based on region.

Humpback whale

MegapteraMegapterinaehumpback whales
The word "song" is used to describe the pattern of regular and predictable sounds made by some species of whales, notably the humpback whale.
Males produce a complex song lasting 10 to 20 minutes, which they repeat for hours at a time.

Whale

whalesflukeflukes
Whale sounds are used by whales for different kinds of communication.
Some species, such as the humpback whale, communicate using melodic sounds, known as whale song.

Dolphin

dolphinsgenital slitaquatic mammal
Marine mammals, such as whales, dolphins, and porpoises, are much more dependent on sound for communication and sensation than are land mammals, because other senses are of limited effectiveness in water.
Dolphin echolocation clicks are amongst the loudest sounds made by marine animals.

Baleen whale

Mysticetibaleen whalesmysticete
The precise mechanism differs in the two major suborders of cetaceans: the Odontoceti (toothed whales—including dolphins) and the Mysticeti (baleen whales—including the largest whales, such as the blue whale).
Male strategies for reproductive success vary between performing ritual displays (whale song) or lek mating.

Roger Payne

Dr. Roger S. PaynePayneRoger S. Payne
Interest in whale song was aroused by researchers Roger Payne and Scott McVay after the songs were brought to their attention by a Bermudian named Frank Watlington who was working for the US government at the SOFAR station listening for Russian submarines with underwater hydrophones off the coast of the island.
Roger Searle Payne (born January 29, 1935) is an American biologist and environmentalist famous for the 1967 discovery (with Scott McVay) of whale song among humpback whales.

Songs of the Humpback Whale (album)

Songs of the Humpback WhaleSongs of the Humpback Whale'' (album)
Payne released the best-selling Songs of the Humpback Whale in 1970, and the whale songs were quickly incorporated into human music by among others singer Judy Collins.
It publicly demonstrated for the first time the elaborate whale vocalizations of Humpbacks, and became the bestselling environmental album in history, selling over 100,000 copies.

Toothed whale

Odontocetitoothed whalesodontocete
The precise mechanism differs in the two major suborders of cetaceans: the Odontoceti (toothed whales—including dolphins) and the Mysticeti (baleen whales—including the largest whales, such as the blue whale).
Toothed whale biosonar clicks are amongst the loudest sounds made by marine animals.

Song

songstrackstrack
The word "song" is used to describe the pattern of regular and predictable sounds made by some species of whales, notably the humpback whale.

52-hertz whale

52Hz whaleLonely Whale's story
It has been detected regularly in many locations since the late 1980s and appears to be the only individual emitting a whale call at this frequency.

Biomusic

brainwave" musicnature sounds
Recorded whale song also frequently inspired 20th century experimental music.

Lombard effect

An important finding is that whales, in a process called the Lombard effect, adjust their song to compensate for background noise pollution.

Bioacoustics

bioacousticbioacousticalacoustic biodiversity

Marine mammal

marine mammalssea mammalssea mammal
Marine mammals, such as whales, dolphins, and porpoises, are much more dependent on sound for communication and sensation than are land mammals, because other senses are of limited effectiveness in water.

Porpoise

PhocoenidaeporpoisesPhocoenidae indet.
Marine mammals, such as whales, dolphins, and porpoises, are much more dependent on sound for communication and sensation than are land mammals, because other senses are of limited effectiveness in water.

Visual perception

visionsighteyesight
Sight is less effective for marine mammals because of the particulate way in which the ocean scatters light.

Light

visible lightvisiblelight source
Sight is less effective for marine mammals because of the particulate way in which the ocean scatters light.

Olfaction

olfactorysmellsense of smell
Smell is also limited, as molecules diffuse more slowly in water than in air, which makes smelling less effective.

Molecule

molecularmoleculesmolecular structure
Smell is also limited, as molecules diffuse more slowly in water than in air, which makes smelling less effective.

Speed of sound

subsonicsound speedsound velocity
However, the speed of sound is roughly four times greater in water than in the atmosphere at sea level.

Sea level

mean sea levelMSLAMSL
However, the speed of sound is roughly four times greater in water than in the atmosphere at sea level.

Cetology

cetologistcetologistsacademic studies or approaches to biology of cetaceans
Because sea mammals are so dependent on hearing to communicate and feed, environmentalists and cetologists are concerned that they are being harmed by the increased ambient noise in the world's oceans caused by ships, sonar and marine seismic surveys.

Background noise

ambient noisebackgroundambient
Because sea mammals are so dependent on hearing to communicate and feed, environmentalists and cetologists are concerned that they are being harmed by the increased ambient noise in the world's oceans caused by ships, sonar and marine seismic surveys.