White House

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The White House is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States.wikipedia
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Pennsylvania Avenue

Pennsylvania Avenue NWPennsylvania Avenue SEPennsylvania
It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. and has been the residence of every U.S. President since John Adams in 1800.
Pennsylvania Avenue is a diagonal street in Washington, D.C. that connects the White House and the United States Capitol.

John Adams

AdamsJohnJ. Adams
It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. and has been the residence of every U.S. President since John Adams in 1800.
He was the first president to reside in the executive mansion now known as the White House.

Executive Residence

State FloorSecond FloorExecutive Residence at the White House
Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed Executive Residence in October 1817.
The Executive Residence is the central building of the White House complex located between the East Wing and West Wing.

West Wing

In Celebration of the Centennial of the West Wing of the White House, 2002
Because of crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had all work offices relocated to the newly constructed West Wing in 1901.
The West Wing of the White House houses the offices of the President of the United States.

Benjamin Henry Latrobe

Benjamin LatrobeLatrobeBenjamin H. Latrobe
When Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801, he (with architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe) added low colonnades on each wing that concealed stables and storage.
He also was responsible for the design of the White House porticos.

Official residence

residenceexecutive mansionofficial home
The White House is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States.
White House (President)

Burning of Washington

burned Washingtonattack on Washingtonburning of the White House
In 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior.
On August 24, 1814, after defeating the Americans at the Battle of Bladensburg, a British force led by Major General Robert Ross burned down buildings including the White House (then called the Presidential Mansion), the Capitol, as well as other facilities of the U.S. government.

East Wing

East
A newly constructed East Wing was used as a reception area for social events; Jefferson's colonnades connected the new wings.
The East Wing is a part of the White House Complex.

President's Guest House

Blair HouseBlair-Lee Houseresidence
The modern-day White House complex includes the Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building—the former State Department, which now houses offices for the President's staff and the Vice President—and Blair House, a guest residence.
The President's Guest House is one of several residences owned by the United States government for use by the President and Vice President of the United States; other such residences include the White House, Camp David, One Observatory Circle, the Presidential Townhouse, and Trowbridge House.

Oval Office

Bow WindowEric Gugleroffice
Eight years later in 1909, President William Howard Taft expanded the West Wing and created the first Oval Office, which was eventually moved as the section was expanded. President William Howard Taft enlisted the help of architect Nathan C. Wyeth to add additional space to the West Wing, which included the addition of the Oval Office.
The Oval Office is the working office space of the President of the United States located in the West Wing of the White House, Washington, D.C..

President's Park

Lafayette SquareLafayette ParkEllipse
The property is a National Heritage Site owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President's Park.
President's Park, located in Washington, D.C., encompasses the White House including the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, the Treasury Building (Washington, D.C.), and grounds; the White House Visitor Center; Lafayette Square; and The Ellipse.

Washington, D.C.

WashingtonDistrict of ColumbiaWashington, DC
It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. and has been the residence of every U.S. President since John Adams in 1800. The July 1790 Residence Act named Philadelphia, Pennsylvania the temporary national capital for a 10-year period while the Federal City was under construction.
The Capitol, Treasury, and White House were burned and gutted during the attack.

Blue Room (White House)

Blue RoomBluethe Blue Room
Several other Georgian-era Irish country houses have been suggested as sources of inspiration for the overall floor plan, details like the bow-fronted south front, and interior details like the former niches in the present Blue Room.
The Blue Room is one of three state parlors on the first floor in the White House, the residence of the President of the United States.

Executive Office of the President of the United States

Executive Office of the PresidentWhite HouseSpecial Assistant to the President
The term "White House" is often used as a metonym for the president and his advisers.
With the increase in technological and global advancement, the size of the White House staff has increased to include an array of policy experts to effectively address various fields of the modern day.

Aquia Creek sandstone

Aquia sandstonesandstone
Construction took place between 1792 and 1800 using Aquia Creek sandstone painted white.
The sandstone was the principal material used in such significant buildings as the White House and the early stages of the U.S. Capitol.

Architectural design competition

design competitionarchitectural competitioncompetition
The architect of the White House was chosen in a design competition which received nine proposals, including one submitted anonymously by Thomas Jefferson.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The July 1790 Residence Act named Philadelphia, Pennsylvania the temporary national capital for a 10-year period while the Federal City was under construction.
The state capital was moved to Lancaster in 1799, then Harrisburg in 1812, while the federal government was moved to Washington, D.C. in 1800 upon completion of the White House and U.S. Capitol building.

Neoclassical architecture

NeoclassicalClassical Revivalneo-classical
The residence was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban in the neoclassical style.
International neoclassical architecture was exemplified in Karl Friedrich Schinkel's buildings, especially the Old Museum in Berlin, Sir John Soane's Bank of England in London and the newly built White House and Capitol in Washington, D.C. of the nascent American Republic.

Replicas of the White House

a replica of the White House
As it is a famed structure in America, several replicas of the White House have been constructed.
Replicas of the White House are reproductions of the home of the President of the United States, the White House.

Government House (New York City)

Government House
In May 1790, New York began construction of Government House for his official residence, but he never occupied it. The national capital moved to Philadelphia in December 1790.
Built in 1790 by the state of New York, it was intended to be the executive mansion for President George Washington, but he never occupied it. Before it was completed, the federal government moved temporarily to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; then permanently to Washington, D.C. It then became the state governor’s residence and was used by George Clinton and John Jay.

African Americans

blackAfrican-AmericanAfrican American
The main residence, as well as foundations of the house, were built largely by enslaved and free African-American laborers, as well as employed Europeans.
They not only helped build the U.S. Capitol, they built the White House and other District of Columbia buildings.

Nathan C. Wyeth

Nathan C WyethNathan Corwith WyethNathan Wyeth
President William Howard Taft enlisted the help of architect Nathan C. Wyeth to add additional space to the West Wing, which included the addition of the Oval Office.
He is best known for designing the West Wing of the White House, creating the first Oval Office.

White House Historical Association

White HouseWhite House Historical Society
These influences, though undocumented, are cited in the official White House guide, and in White House Historical Association publications.
The White House Historical Association, founded in 1961 through efforts of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, is a private, non-profit organization with a mission to enhance the public's understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of the White House, the official home and principal workplace of the President of the United States.

Leinster House

the Dáil chamber
Hoban modelled the building on Leinster House in Dublin, a building which today houses the Oireachtas, the Irish legislature.
Its first and second floors were used as the floor model for the White House by Irish architect James Hoban, while the house itself was used as a model for the original stone-cut White House exterior.

Vermeil Room

President Truman had the original timber frame sawed into paneling; the walls of the Vermeil Room, Library, China Room, and Map Room on the ground floor of the main residence were paneled in wood from the timbers.
The Vermeil Room is located on the ground floor of the White House, the official residence of the President of the United States.