A report on White House

Top: the northern facade with a columned portico facing Lafayette Square
Bottom: the southern facade with a semi-circular portico facing the South Lawn and The Ellipse
Aerial view of the White House complex, from north. In the foreground is Pennsylvania Avenue, closed to traffic. Center: Executive Residence (1792–1800) with North Portico (1829) facing; left: East Wing (1942); right: West Wing (1901), with the Oval Office (1934) at its southeast corner.
Hoban's Charleston County Courthouse, Charleston, South Carolina, 1790–92, was admired by Washington.
A 1793 elevation by James Hoban. His 3-story, 9-bay original submission was altered into this 2-story, 11-bay design.
Drawing of Andrea Palladio, Project for Francesco et Lodovico de Trissini, from the book I quattro libri dell'architettura, 1570
The North Portico of the White House compared to Leinster House
The Château de Rastignac compared to the South Portico of the White House, c. 1846
Entrance Hall in 1882, showing the new Tiffany glass screen
Additions proposed by architect Frederick D. Owen (1901)
The North Lawn during the Lincoln administration
Truman reconstruction, 1949–1952. A steel structure is built within the exterior shell.
The Red Room as designed by Stéphane Boudin during the presidency of John F. Kennedy
The White House complex and vicinity, viewed from the north with the Potomac River, Jefferson Memorial and Washington Monument to the south
The building's north front has been on the reverse of the U.S. $20 bill since 1998; an illustration of the south side was used for 70 years before this.
A uniformed US Secret Service Agent on Pennsylvania Avenue
For security reasons, the section of Pennsylvania Avenue on the north side of the White House is closed to all vehicular traffic, except government officials.
First Presidential Mansion: Samuel Osgood House, Manhattan, New York. Occupied by Washington: April 1789{{snd}}February 1790.
Second Presidential Mansion: Alexander Macomb House, Manhattan, New York. Occupied by Washington: February–August 1790.
Third Presidential Mansion: President's House, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Occupied by Washington: November 1790{{snd}}March 1797. Occupied by Adams: March 1797{{snd}}May 1800.
Government House, Manhattan, New York (1790–1791). Built to be the permanent presidential mansion, Congress moved the national capital to Philadelphia before its completion.
House intended for the President, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1790s). Built to be the permanent presidential mansion, it was not used by any president.
The White House as it looked following the fire of August 24, 1814
Jefferson and Latrobe's West Wing Colonnade, in this nineteenth-century engraved view, is now the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room.
Principal story plan for the White House by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, 1807
Earliest known photograph of the White House, taken c. 1846 by John Plumbe during the administration of James K. Polk
The Cross Hall, connecting the State Dining Room and the East Room on the State Floor
Marine One prepares to land on the South Lawn, where State Arrival Ceremonies are held.
View from the south, with south fountain
View from the north, with north fountain
White House at night, view from the north

Official residence and workplace of the president of the United States.

- White House
Top: the northern facade with a columned portico facing Lafayette Square
Bottom: the southern facade with a semi-circular portico facing the South Lawn and The Ellipse

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Washington, D.C.

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Capital city and federal district of the United States.

Capital city and federal district of the United States.

Looking West at the Capitol & the Mall, Washington DC
Historical coat of arms, as recorded in 1876
Following their victory at the Battle of Bladensburg (1814), the British entered Washington, D.C., burning down buildings, including the White House.
President Abraham Lincoln insisted that construction of the United States Capitol dome continue during the American Civil War (1861).
Crowds surrounding the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool during the March on Washington, 1963
Satellite photo of Washington, D.C. by ESA
The Washington Monument, seen across the Tidal Basin during 2007's National Cherry Blossom Festival
The L'Enfant Plan for Washington, D.C., as revised by Andrew Ellicott in 1792
Looking Northwest at the Mall, Washington DC
Looking West from RFK Stadium, Washington DC
Construction of the 12-story Cairo Apartment Building (1894) in the Dupont Circle neighborhood spurred building height restrictions.
The Georgetown neighborhood is known for its historic Federal-style rowhouses. In the foreground is the 19th century Chesapeake and Ohio Canal.
Meridian Hill Park, in Columbia Heights
Map of racial distribution in Washington, D.C., according to the 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
D.C. police on Harley-Davidson motorcycles escort a protest in 2018.
Federal Triangle, between Constitution Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue. The U.S. federal government accounts for about 29% of D.C. jobs.
The Lincoln Memorial receives about six million visits annually.
The Smithsonian Institution is the world's largest research and museum complex. Like its administration building, known as The Castle, many of its museums are on the National Mall.
The National Gallery of Art
The Kennedy Center for Performing Arts is home to the Washington National Opera and National Symphony Orchestra.
Nationals Park in the Navy Yard area on the Anacostia River
is the home of the Washington Nationals baseball team.
The hometown Washington Capitals NHL hockey team plays in Penn Quarter's Capital One Arena; the arena is also home to the Washington Wizards NBA basketball team.
One Franklin Square: The Washington Post Building on Franklin Square
The Watergate complex was the site of the Watergate Scandal, which led to President Nixon's resignation.
The John A. Wilson Building houses the offices of the mayor of Washington and the Council of the District of Columbia.
The Eisenhower Executive Office Building, once the world's largest office building, houses the Executive Office of the President of the United States.
The Library of Congress is one of the world's largest libraries, with more than 167 million cataloged items.
Georgetown Day at Georgetown University
A Blue Line train at Farragut West, an underground station on the Washington Metro
Washington Union Station is one of the busiest rail stations in the United States.
I-66 in Washington, D.C.
The Capitol Power Plant, built to supply energy for the U.S. Capitol Complex, is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol.

The Capitol, Treasury, and White House were burned and gutted during the attack.

West front (2013)

United States Capitol

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Meeting place of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

Meeting place of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

West front (2013)
United States Capitol and reflecting pool
The east front of the United States Capitol (2013 view)
The east front at night (2013 view)
Design for the U.S. Capitol, "An Elevation for a Capitol", by James Diamond was one of many submitted in the 1792 contest, but not selected.
The winning design for the U.S. Capitol, submitted by William Thornton
Samuel Morse's 1822 painting of the House in session shows the interior design of the House chamber.
The Capitol when first occupied by Congress (painting circa 1800 by William Russell Birch)
The Capitol from Pennsylvania Avenue as it stood before 1814 (drawn from memory by an unknown artist after the burning)
Daguerreotype of east side of the Capitol in 1846, by John Plumbe, showing Bulfinch's dome
The Capitol in 1814 after the burning of Washington by the British, during the War of 1812 (painting by George Munger)
The earliest known interior photograph of the Capitol, taken in 1860 and showing the new House of Representatives chamber
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln in 1861, before the partially complete Capitol dome
Capitol Rotunda (2013 view)
The Apotheosis of Washington, the 1865 fresco painted by Constantino Brumidi on the interior of the Capitol's dome (2005 view)
Carlo Franzoni's 1819 sculptural chariot clock, the Car of History, depicting Clio, the Greek muse of history. National Statuary Hall (2006 view).
Capitol Rotunda (2005 view)
Declaration of Independence (1819), by John Trumbull
National Statuary Hall Collection viewed from the south
Capitol Crypt
President George W. Bush delivering the annual State of the Union address in the House chamber
Old Supreme Court Chamber (2007 view)
US Senate chamber (circa 1873 view)
A 2007 aerial view of the Capitol Grounds from the west
Magnolias bloom on the Capitol Grounds in March 2020
The body of former President Ronald Reagan lying in state in June 2004
Exterior of the Capitol prior to the 2015 visit by Pope Francis
2021 United States Capitol attack
The opening ceremony of the Capitol Visitor Center in December 2008. The plaster cast model of the Statue of Freedom is in the foreground.
The Capitol on a 1922 US postage stamp
A snowball fight on the Capitol lawn, 1923.
The Capitol at night in 2006
The Capitol surrounded by snow in 2011
House of Representatives pediment, Apotheosis of Democracy, by Paul Wayland Bartlett, 1916
The Capitol following a blizzard in 2010.
The Genius of America pediment, East Portico, carved by Bruno Mankowski 1959-60 (after Luigi Persico's 1825-1828 original)

L'Enfant chose Jenkin's Hill as the site for the "Congress House", with a "grand avenue" (now Pennsylvania Avenue, NW) connecting it with the President's House, and a public space containing a broader "grand avenue" (now the National Mall) stretching westward to the Potomac River (see: L'Enfant Plan).

President of the United States

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Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

George Washington, the first president of the United States
President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivers a radio address, 1933
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King Jr. and others look on
President Donald Trump delivers his 2018 State of the Union Address, with Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Gorbachev sign the 1990 Chemical Weapons Accord in the White House.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, successfully preserved the Union during the American Civil War.
President Barack Obama with his Supreme Court appointee Justice Sotomayor, 2009
President Ronald Reagan reviews honor guards during a state visit to China, 1984
President Woodrow Wilson throws out the ceremonial first ball on Opening Day, 1916
President Jimmy Carter (left) debates Republican nominee Ronald Reagan on October 28, 1980.
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the congressional district method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a record four presidential elections (1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944), leading to the adoption of a two-term limit.
President William McKinley and his successor, Theodore Roosevelt
President Reagan surrounded by Secret Service
From left: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Photo taken in the Oval Office on January 7, 2009; Obama formally took office thirteen days later.
Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, 2013
White House, the official residence
Camp David, the official retreat
Blair House, the official guest house
The presidential limousine, dubbed "The Beast"
The presidential plane, called Air Force One when the president is on board
Marine One helicopter, when the president is aboard

The White House in Washington, D.C. is the official residence of the president.

North facade of the White House Executive Residence

Executive Residence

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North facade of the White House Executive Residence
White House Ground Floor showing location of principal rooms
White House State Floor showing location of principal rooms
White House Second Floor showing location of principal rooms
The Diplomatic Reception Room on the Ground Floor of the White House
The East Room after its last redecoration in 1995
The Green Room in 1999
The Red Room during the George W. Bush administration
The Blue Room after its 1995 redecoration
The Family Dining Room after its February 2015 redecoration
The Grand Staircase, leading up to the Second Floor
First Lady Laura Bush and Michelle Obama in the West Sitting Hall in 2008
The Queens' Bedroom in 2000
The Presidential Bedroom Suite, after redecoration in 1981

The Executive Residence is the central building of the White House complex located between the East Wing and West Wing.

The West Wing (lower right) by night, December 2006

West Wing

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The West Wing (lower right) by night, December 2006
The White House Complex
The main entrance on the north side
West Wing from above. Note the Oval Office and the solar panels on the roof of the Cabinet Room.
First Floor plan
Ground Floor plan
Second Floor plan
Original West Wing and tennis court, circa 1903
Expanded West Wing, circa the 1910s. President Taft's 1909 expansion covered most of the tennis court. Note the "bow" of the first Oval Office.
President Hoover views West Wing fire ruins, January 15, 1930
Modern West Wing under construction, circa 1933
Exterior of the modern Oval Office, completed 1934
Oval Office Study, 2009
Private Dining Room, 1988
Roosevelt Room, 2006
Secretary's office, 1961
James S. Brady Press Briefing Room, 2007. Formerly, the swimming pool.
Ground Floor Lobby
The Situation Room, newly renovated during the Presidency of George W. Bush
Entrance to the White House Mess, decorated for Halloween

The West Wing of the White House houses the offices of the president of the United States.

A stereograph view of the Blue Room during the administration of President Ulysses S. Grant.

Blue Room (White House)

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A stereograph view of the Blue Room during the administration of President Ulysses S. Grant.
The 2009 White House State Floor plan shows the location of the Blue Room, just inside the Southern Portico.
East wall of the Blue Room of the White House, looking south, c. 1875. Rotogravure on paper.

The Blue Room is one of three state parlors on the first floor in the White House, the residence of the president of the United States.

Looking southeast down Pennsylvania Avenue, NW towards the United States Capitol seen here from the Old Post Office Pavilion.

Pennsylvania Avenue

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Looking southeast down Pennsylvania Avenue, NW towards the United States Capitol seen here from the Old Post Office Pavilion.
Pennsylvania Avenue NW street sign near the White House
A 1942 photo of a DC 4 shield.
Drawing of Pennsylvania Avenue and the Capitol before it was burned down in 1814
Intersection of 11th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, in 1921
Looking southeast down Pennsylvania Avenue towards the Old Post Office Pavilion and United States Capitol.
Crossroads of K Street and Pennsylvania Avenue in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood
Protesters marching down Pennsylvania Avenue during the September 15, 2007 anti-war protest.
The White House is at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.
Storefronts along Pennsylvania Avenue in the Capitol Hill neighborhood

Pennsylvania Avenue is a diagonal street in Washington, D.C., and Prince George's County, Maryland, that connects the White House and the United States Capitol and then crosses the city to Maryland.

President Joe Biden on the night of his inauguration, Wednesday, January 20, 2021

Oval Office

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Formal working space of the President of the United States.

Formal working space of the President of the United States.

President Joe Biden on the night of his inauguration, Wednesday, January 20, 2021
President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris in the Oval Office, April 12, 2021
President's House, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. George Washington's bow window (not depicted) is echoed in the shape of the Oval Office.
Theodore Roosevelt Executive Office and Cabinet Room, c. undefined1904
Taft Oval Office, completed 1909. Nearly identical in size to the modern office, it was damaged by fire in 1929 and demolished in 1933.
Location of the Oval Office in the West Wing.
Franklin D. Roosevelt in the newly completed Modern Oval Office, December 31, 1934.
Plaster ceiling medallion installed in 1934 includes elements of the Seal of the President of the United States.
Caroline Kennedy and Kerry Kennedy beneath the Resolute desk in 1963. Note the Truman carpet.
President Truman receiving a marble bust of Simon Bolivar from a Venezuelan delegation, December 27, 1946
President Barack Obama with Oval Office artwork, September 28, 2012
The Oval Office floor has been replaced several times, most recently during the administration of George W. Bush. The 2005 installation, based on the original 1933 design by Eric Gugler, features a contrasting cross pattern of quarter sawn oak and walnut.
Location of the Yellow Oval Room on the second floor of the White House. A number of presidents used this as their private office or library.
The Yellow Oval Room about 1868 used as President Andrew Johnson's private office.
The Yellow Oval Room as President Grover Cleveland's private office, 1886. Note the Resolute desk before the 3 windows.
The Yellow Oval Room as President Franklin D. Roosevelt's private office, 1933.
Exterior of the West Wing (circa 1910s), showing the curve of the Taft Oval Office.
President Hoover views West Wing fire ruins, January 15, 1930.
West Wing expansion, 1934.
Exterior of the Oval Office from the South Lawn, July 15, 2006.
George Washington (1776) by Charles Willson Peale
George Washington ({{circa}}1823) by Rembrandt Peale
City of Washington from Beyond the Navy Yard (1833) by George Cooke
Eastport and Passamaquoddy Bay ({{circa}}1840) by Victor De Grailly
Andrew Jackson (1845) by Thomas Sully
Waiting for the Hour (1863) by William Tolman Carlton
Passing the Outpost (1881) by Alfred Wordsworth Thompson
The Broncho Buster (1895) by Frederic Remington
Abraham Lincoln ({{circa}}1915) by George Story
The Avenue in the Rain (1917) by Childe Hassam
Franklin D. Roosevelt (1947) by Frank O. Salisbury
Earthrise (1968) by William Anders
John F. Kennedy's children visit the Oval Office
The Oval Office during the presidency of Gerald Ford
President Richard M. Nixon and Bob Hope play golf in the Oval Office, a tradition harking back to the tenure of Lyndon B. Johnson
President George W. Bush chose a more muted color palette than his predecessor, using shades of taupe, celadon and navy.
One of many hand-shake photos in front of the fireplace. President George W. Bush sitting to the viewer's right, the guest (Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda) to the left, March 2003. One of the rare images where there is fire in the fireplace.
A panoramic view of the Oval Office, January 26, 2017. President Donald Trump is seated at the Resolute desk.

Part of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, it is located in the West Wing of the White House, in Washington, D.C.

Burning of Washington, Paul de Thoyras

Burning of Washington

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British invasion of Washington City , the capital of the United States, during the Chesapeake Campaign of the War of 1812.

British invasion of Washington City , the capital of the United States, during the Chesapeake Campaign of the War of 1812.

Burning of Washington, Paul de Thoyras
British and American movements during the Chesapeake Campaign 1814
Admiralty House, Mount Wyndham, Bermuda, where the attack was planned
Burning of Washington, August 1814
The United States Capitol after the burning of Washington, D.C. in the War of 1812. Watercolor and ink depiction from 1814, restored.
The White House ruins after the conflagration of August 24, 1814. Watercolor by George Munger, displayed at the White House.
Major-General Robert Ross, British commander who led the attack on Washington
Portrait of Admiral Cockburn at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, with Washington burning in the background. The U.S. Capitol and Treasury Building are at far right.
The US Treasury Building (built 1804)
The Blodget Hotel which housed the US Patent Office; spared during the burning of Washington in 1814. The Patent Office later burned in 1836.
The Washington Navy Yard in 1862
The Old Brick Capitol serving as a prison during the Civil War

That night, British forces set fire to multiple government and military buildings, including the White House (then called the Presidential Mansion), the Capitol building, as well as other facilities of the U.S. government.

Blair House

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Official residence in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.

Official residence in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.

Blair House, as a separate building, pictured in about 1919
A marker on the exterior of Blair House memorializes police officer Leslie Coffelt, who was killed defending the building in 1950.
Facade of the original Blair House during the state visit of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom in 2007. The Royal Standard of the United Kingdom is flying from the flagpole.
President Park Geun-hye of South Korea (left) hosts a 2013 meeting with World Bank leaders in the President's Guest House.
Aerial view of Pennsylvania Avenue, with the President's Guest House in relation to other presidential facilities near President's Park.
The wallpaper in the Dillon Room dates to 1770.
The library at the President's Guest House hosts a collection of books deposited by the home's former guests.
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton hosts a working lunch for French president Francois Hollande in the Treaty Room in 2012.
Two special agents of the Diplomatic Security Service guard a motorcade vehicle outside the President's Guest House in 2005.

Located just across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House, it is a complex of four formerly separate homes—Blair House, Lee House, Peter Parker House, and 704 Jackson Place.