White blood cell

leukocyteleukocyteswhite blood cellsimmune cellsimmune cellleucocyteleucocytesinflammatory cellWBCwhite
White blood cells (WBCs), also called leukocytes or leucocytes, are the cells of the immune system that are involved in protecting the body against both infectious disease and foreign invaders.wikipedia
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Blood

human bloodhematologicaloxygen consumption
Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system.
The blood cells are mainly red blood cells (also called RBCs or erythrocytes), white blood cells (also called WBCs or leukocytes) and platelets (also called thrombocytes).

Granulocyte

granulocytesgranulocytopeniapolymorphonuclear leukocyte
Two pairs of broadest categories classify them either by structure (granulocytes or agranulocytes) or by cell lineage (myeloid cells or lymphoid cells).
Granulocytes are a category of white blood cells characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm.

Lymphocyte

lymphocyteslymphocyticlymphoid cells
These broadest categories can be further divided into the five main types: neutrophils, eosinophils (acidophiles), basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes.
A lymphocyte is one of the subtypes of a white blood cell in a vertebrate's immune system.

Agranulocyte

mononuclear cellmononuclear cellsmononuclear leukocytes
Two pairs of broadest categories classify them either by structure (granulocytes or agranulocytes) or by cell lineage (myeloid cells or lymphoid cells).
Agranulocytes or nongranulocytes, also mononuclear leukocytes, are one of the two types of white blood cells, also known as leukocytes.

Monocyte

monocytesmonocyticmononuclear
These broadest categories can be further divided into the five main types: neutrophils, eosinophils (acidophiles), basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes.
Monocytes are a type of leukocyte, or white blood cell.

B cell

B cellsB-cellB lymphocytes
Further subtypes can be classified; for example, among lymphocytes, there are B cells, T cells, and NK cells.
B cells, also known as B lymphocytes, are a type of white blood cell of the small lymphocyte subtype.

Blood cell

blood cellshematopoietic cellhemocyte
All white blood cells have nuclei, which distinguishes them from the other blood cells, the anucleated red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets.
White blood cells or leukocytes, are cells of the immune system involved in defending the body against both infectious disease and foreign materials.

Leukocytosis

increased white blood cell countelevated white blood cell counthigh white blood cell count
An increase in the number of leukocytes over the upper limits is called leukocytosis.
Leukocytosis is white cells (the leukocyte count) above the normal range in the blood.

Natural killer cell

NK cellsnatural killer cellsNK cell
Further subtypes can be classified; for example, among lymphocytes, there are B cells, T cells, and NK cells.
Typically, immune cells detect the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presented on infected cell surfaces, triggering cytokine release, causing lysis or apoptosis.

Leukopenia

leucopenialow white blood cellslow white blood cell count
A decrease below the lower limit is called leukopenia.
Leukopenia is a decrease in the number of leukocytes.

Bone marrow

marrowred bone marrowbone marrow stroma
All white blood cells are produced and derived from multipotent cells in the bone marrow known as hematopoietic stem cells.
Marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells which give rise to the three classes of blood cells that are found in circulation: white blood cells (leukocytes), red blood cells (erythrocytes), and platelets (thrombocytes).

Complete blood count

full blood countwhite blood cell countCBC
The number of leukocytes in the blood is often an indicator of disease, and thus the white blood cell count is an important subset of the complete blood count.
The cells that circulate in the bloodstream are generally divided into three types: white blood cells (leukocytes), red blood cells (erythrocytes), and platelets (thrombocytes).

Cell nucleus

nucleusnucleinuclear
All white blood cells have nuclei, which distinguishes them from the other blood cells, the anucleated red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets.
In most types of granulocyte, a white blood cell, the nucleus is lobated and can be bi-lobed, tri-lobed or multi-lobed.

Neutrophil

neutrophilsneutrophil granulocyteneutrophilic
These broadest categories can be further divided into the five main types: neutrophils, eosinophils (acidophiles), basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes. The buffy coat may sometimes be green if there are large amounts of neutrophils in the sample, due to the heme-containing enzyme myeloperoxidase that they produce.
Neutrophils (also known as neutrocytes) are the most abundant type of granulocytes and the most abundant (60% to 70%) type of white blood cells in most mammals.

Eosinophil

eosinophilseosinophil granulocyteEosino
These broadest categories can be further divided into the five main types: neutrophils, eosinophils (acidophiles), basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes.
Eosinophils, sometimes called eosinophiles or, less commonly, acidophils, are a variety of white blood cells and one of the immune system components responsible for combating multicellular parasites and certain infections in vertebrates.

Basophil

basophilsbasophil granulocytebasophilic
These broadest categories can be further divided into the five main types: neutrophils, eosinophils (acidophiles), basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes.
Basophils are a type of white blood cell.

Hematocrit

haematocrithemoconcentrationpacked cell volume
White blood cells make up approximately 1% of the total blood volume in a healthy adult, making them substantially less numerous than the red blood cells at 40% to 45%.
It is a part of a person's complete blood count results, along with hemoglobin concentration, white blood cell count, and platelet count.

Immune system

immuneimmune responseimmune function
White blood cells (WBCs), also called leukocytes or leucocytes, are the cells of the immune system that are involved in protecting the body against both infectious disease and foreign invaders.
Eicosanoids include prostaglandins that produce fever and the dilation of blood vessels associated with inflammation, and leukotrienes that attract certain white blood cells (leukocytes).

Myeloperoxidase

MPOverdoperoxidase.
The buffy coat may sometimes be green if there are large amounts of neutrophils in the sample, due to the heme-containing enzyme myeloperoxidase that they produce.
MPO is most abundantly expressed in neutrophil granulocytes (a subtype of white blood cells), and produces hypohalous acids to carry out their antimicrobial activity.

Inflammation

inflammatoryinflammatory responseinflamed
This increase is most commonly caused by inflammation.
Inflammation (from inflammatio) is part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants, and is a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators.

Granule (cell biology)

granulesgranulegranular
Granulocytes are distinguished from agranulocytes by their nucleus shape (lobed versus round, that is, polymorphonuclear versus mononuclear) and by their cytoplasm granules (present or absent, or more precisely, visible on light microscopy or not thus visible).
A group of leukocytes called granulocytes contain granules and play an important role in the immune system.

Buffy coat

buffy'' ''coatBuffy-coat
The buffy coat may sometimes be green if there are large amounts of neutrophils in the sample, due to the heme-containing enzyme myeloperoxidase that they produce. White cells are found in the buffy coat, a thin, typically white layer of nucleated cells between the sedimented red blood cells and the blood plasma.
The buffy coat is the fraction of an anticoagulated blood sample that contains most of the white blood cells and platelets following density gradient centrifugation of the blood.

Lymphatic system

lymphoidlymphoid tissuelymphatic
Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system.
It consists of connective tissue formed of reticular fibers, with various types of leukocytes, (white blood cells), mostly lymphocytes enmeshed in it, through which the lymph passes.

Histamine

histaminesHistaminantihistaminic
Basophils are chiefly responsible for allergic and antigen response by releasing the chemical histamine causing the dilation of blood vessels.
Histamine increases the permeability of the capillaries to white blood cells and some proteins, to allow them to engage pathogens in the infected tissues.

Macrophage

macrophagesM2 macrophagesTissue macrophages
Monocytes eventually leave the bloodstream and become tissue macrophages, which remove dead cell debris as well as attack microorganisms.
Macrophages (big eaters, from Greek μακρός (makrós) = large, φαγεῖν (phagein) = to eat ) are a type of white blood cell, of the immune system, that engulfs and digests cellular debris, foreign substances, microbes, cancer cells, and anything else that does not have the type of proteins specific to healthy body cells on its surface in a process called phagocytosis.