White nationalism

white nationalistwhite nationalistswhite powerEthno-nationalistnationalismwhite nationwhite-nationalistAmerican NationalistsAmerican white nationalismCaucasian nationalists
White nationalism is a type of nationalism or pan-nationalism which espouses the belief that white people are a race and seeks to develop and maintain a white racial and national identity.wikipedia
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White genocide conspiracy theory

white genocidegenocide against white peoplea supposed white genocide
Many white nationalists believe that miscegenation, multiculturalism, immigration of nonwhites and low birth rates among whites are threatening the white race, and some believe these things are being promoted as part of an attempted white genocide.
The purpose of the conspiracy theory is to scare white people, and justify a commitment to a white nationalist agenda in support of increasingly successful calls to violence.

Ku Klux Klan

KKKKlansmanKlansmen
Modern members of racist organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan generally favor the term and avoid self-describing as white supremacist.
Each has advocated extremist reactionary positions such as white nationalism, anti-immigration and—especially in later iterations—Nordicism and anti-Catholicism.

White pride

White PowerWhite Pride World Wide
Critics argue that the term "white nationalism" is simply a "rebranding" and ideas such as white pride exist solely to provide a sanitized public face for white supremacy, and that most white nationalist groups promote racial violence.
White pride, or white power, is an expression primarily used by white separatist, white nationalist, neo-Nazi and white supremacist organizations in order to signal racist or racialist viewpoints.

William Daniel Johnson

Many white nationalists oppose Israel and Zionism, while some, such as William Daniel Johnson and Taylor, have expressed support for Israel and have drawn parallels between their ideology and Zionism.
William Daniel Johnson (born 1954) is an American white nationalist, attorney, and the chairman of the American Freedom Party.

Christian Identity

Christian Identity movementIdentity ChristianityIdentity Christians
White nationalists embrace a variety of religious and non-religious beliefs, including various denominations of Christianity, generally Protestant, although some specifically overlap with white nationalist ideology (Christian Identity, for example, is a family of white supremacist denominations), Germanic neopaganism (e.g. Wotanism) and atheism. Included under the neo-völkisch umbrella are movements ranging from conservative revolutionary schools of thought (Nouvelle Droite, European New Right, Evolian Traditionalism) to white supremacist and white separatist interpretations of Christianity and paganism (Christian Identity, Creativity, Nordic racial paganism) to neo-Nazi subcultures (Esoteric Hitlerism, Nazi Satanism, National Socialist black metal).
The Christian Identity movement first received widespread attention from the mainstream media in 1984, when the white nationalist organization The Order embarked on a murderous crime spree before it was suppressed by the FBI.

Jared Taylor

White nationalist Jared Taylor has argued that Jews can be considered "white", although this is controversial within white nationalist circles.
Taylor has been described as a white nationalist, white supremacist, and racist by civil rights groups, news media, academics studying racism in the US, and others.

William Lane

Its founder, William Lane, intended the settlement to be based on a "common-hold" instead of a commonwealth, life marriage, teetotalism, communism and a brotherhood of Anglophone white people and the preservation of the "colour-line".
He authored works covering topics such as labour rights and white nationalism.

Nationalism

nationalistnationalisticnationalists
White nationalism is a type of nationalism or pan-nationalism which espouses the belief that white people are a race and seeks to develop and maintain a white racial and national identity.
Specific examples are black nationalism and white nationalism.

Alt-right

alt-right movementalt-leftAlternative Right
More recently, the alt-right, a broad term covering many different far-right ideologies and groups in the United States, some of which endorse white nationalism, has gained traction as an alternative to mainstream conservatism in its national politics.
The alt-right, an abbreviation of alternative right, is a loosely connected far-right, white nationalist movement that originated in the United States.

Neo-völkisch movements

neo-völkischTempelhofgesellschaftNeo-''völkisch'' movements
During the 1980s the United States also saw an increase in the number of neo-völkisch movements. Included under the neo-völkisch umbrella are movements ranging from conservative revolutionary schools of thought (Nouvelle Droite, European New Right, Evolian Traditionalism) to white supremacist and white separatist interpretations of Christianity and paganism (Christian Identity, Creativity, Nordic racial paganism) to neo-Nazi subcultures (Esoteric Hitlerism, Nazi Satanism, National Socialist black metal).
Some identify as neo-fascist, neo-Nazi, Third Positionist or alt-right while others are politicised around some form of white nationalism or identity politics and may show neo-tribalist-neo-pagan tendencies such as the one promoted by Else Christensen's Odinist Fellowship.

Esoteric Nazism

Esoteric HitlerismEsoteric Hitleristesoteric Nazi
Included under the neo-völkisch umbrella are movements ranging from conservative revolutionary schools of thought (Nouvelle Droite, European New Right, Evolian Traditionalism) to white supremacist and white separatist interpretations of Christianity and paganism (Christian Identity, Creativity, Nordic racial paganism) to neo-Nazi subcultures (Esoteric Hitlerism, Nazi Satanism, National Socialist black metal).
After 1945, esoteric elements of the Third Reich were adapted into new völkisch religions of white nationalism and neo-Nazism.

Ethnic nationalism

ethno-nationalistethnic nationalistethnonationalism
Some are neo-fascist, neo-Nazi or Third Positionist; others are politicised around some form of white ethnic nationalism or identity politics, and a few have national anarchist tendencies.
While some types of ethnic nationalism are firmly rooted in the idea of ethnicity (or race) as an immutable inherited characteristic (for example black nationalism or white nationalism), often ethnic nationalism also manifests in the assimilation of minority ethnic groups into the dominant group (for example as with Italianisation).

National Socialist black metal

NSBMFascist black metalmovement
Included under the neo-völkisch umbrella are movements ranging from conservative revolutionary schools of thought (Nouvelle Droite, European New Right, Evolian Traditionalism) to white supremacist and white separatist interpretations of Christianity and paganism (Christian Identity, Creativity, Nordic racial paganism) to neo-Nazi subcultures (Esoteric Hitlerism, Nazi Satanism, National Socialist black metal).
Artists who hold far-right or white nationalist beliefs but do not express these in their music are not often deemed NSBM by the greater black metal scene, but may be labelled as such in the media.

Neo-Nazism

neo-Nazineo-Nazisneonazi
Some are neo-fascist, neo-Nazi or Third Positionist; others are politicised around some form of white ethnic nationalism or identity politics, and a few have national anarchist tendencies.
Later leaders of American white nationalism came to politics through the ANP; including a teenage David Duke and William Luther Pierce of the National Alliance, although they soon distanced themselves from explicit self-identification with neo-Nazism.

American Nazi Party

National Socialist White People's PartyNew OrderAmerican Nazi
The slogan "white power" was popularized by American Nazi Party leader George Lincoln Rockwell, who used the term in a debate with Stokely Carmichael of the Black Panther Party after Carmichael issued a call for "black power".
with "White Power!", limiting public display of the swastika, and entering candidates in local elections.

Identity politics

gender politicsidentitypolitics of identity
Some are neo-fascist, neo-Nazi or Third Positionist; others are politicised around some form of white ethnic nationalism or identity politics, and a few have national anarchist tendencies.
The mid-2010s have seen a marked rise of identity politics, including white identity politics in the United States.

Nativism (politics)

nativistnativismnativists
Some critics argue that white nationalists—while posturing as civil rights groups advocating the interests of their racial group—frequently draw on the nativist traditions of the KKK and the British National Front.
Similar to the white nationalist belief of The Great Replacement, nativists fear immigrants could eventually "swamp" native populations due to a lower birth rate among natives.

American Freedom Party

American Third PositionAmerican Third Position PartyAmerican Freedom
The American Freedom Party (formerly the American Third Position Party or A3P) is a Third Position American political party that promotes white nationalism.

National Front (UK)

National FrontBritish National FrontNF
Some critics argue that white nationalists—while posturing as civil rights groups advocating the interests of their racial group—frequently draw on the nativist traditions of the KKK and the British National Front.
The party espouses the ethnic nationalist view that only white people should be citizens of the United Kingdom.

White supremacy

white supremacistwhite supremacistswhite supremacism
Included under the neo-völkisch umbrella are movements ranging from conservative revolutionary schools of thought (Nouvelle Droite, European New Right, Evolian Traditionalism) to white supremacist and white separatist interpretations of Christianity and paganism (Christian Identity, Creativity, Nordic racial paganism) to neo-Nazi subcultures (Esoteric Hitlerism, Nazi Satanism, National Socialist black metal). Analysts describe white nationalism as overlapping with white supremacism and white separatism.
According to Kathleen Belew, a historian of race and racism in the United States, white militancy shifted after the Vietnam War from supporting the existing racial order to a more radical position—self-described as "white power" or "white nationalism"—committed to overthrowing the United States government and establishing a white homeland.

Creativity (religion)

Creativity MovementCreativityWorld Church of the Creator
Included under the neo-völkisch umbrella are movements ranging from conservative revolutionary schools of thought (Nouvelle Droite, European New Right, Evolian Traditionalism) to white supremacist and white separatist interpretations of Christianity and paganism (Christian Identity, Creativity, Nordic racial paganism) to neo-Nazi subcultures (Esoteric Hitlerism, Nazi Satanism, National Socialist black metal).
The movement rejects Christianity and espouses white nationalism and anti-Semitism.

League of the South

The League of the SouthBrad "Hunter Wallace" Griffin
The League of the South (LS) is a white nationalist, Neo-Confederate, white supremacist organization, headquartered in Killen, Alabama, which states that its ultimate goal is "a free and independent Southern republic".

Nordicism

NordicistNordicNordic ideologist
Different racial theories, such as Nordicism and Germanism, define different groups as white, both excluding some southern and eastern Europeans because of a perceived racial taint.

Zionist Occupation Government conspiracy theory

Zionist Occupation GovernmentZionist Occupied GovernmentJewish World Conspiracy
Critics have noted the anti-semitic rhetoric used by some white nationalists, as highlighted by the promotion of conspiracy theories such as Zionist Occupation Government.
The expression is used by white supremacist, white nationalist, far-right, nativist, or antisemitic groups in the United States and Europe, as well as by ultra-nationalists such as Pamyat in Russia, and various far-right groups including the Freemen, Identity Christians, Odinists, and Ku Klux Klan.

Australian Protectionist Party

ProtectionistAPP
The Australian Protectionist Party (APP) is a minor Australian far-right anti-immigration party, focused on economic protectionism and white nationalism.