Wi-Fi

WiFiwireless internetwirelessdual-band Wi-Fiwireless Internet accessWi-Fi networkwireless internet connectionWi FiWi-Fi 802.11Wi-Fi connection
Wi-Fi is a family of wireless networking technologies, based on the IEEE 802.11 family of standards, which are commonly used for local area networking of devices and Internet access.wikipedia
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Wi-Fi Alliance

Application Specific DeviceWi-Fi AwareWi-Fi EasyMesh
WiFi is a trademark of the non-profit Wi-Fi Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing.
Wi-Fi Alliance is a non-profit organization that promotes Wi-Fi technology and certifies Wi-Fi products for conformity to certain standards of interoperability.

IEEE 802.11

802.11802.11b/g/n802.11b/g
Wi-Fi is a family of wireless networking technologies, based on the IEEE 802.11 family of standards, which are commonly used for local area networking of devices and Internet access.
IEEE 802.11 is part of the IEEE 802 set of LAN protocols, and specifies the set of media access control (MAC) and physical layer (PHY) protocols for implementing wireless local area network (WLAN) Wi-Fi computer communication in various frequencies, including but not limited to 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 60 GHz frequency bands.

Wireless access point

access pointaccess pointsWAP
Compatible devices can network through a wireless access point to each other as well as to wired devices and the Internet.
In computer networking, a wireless access point (WAP), or more generally just access point (AP), is a networking hardware device that allows other Wi-Fi devices to connect to a wired network.

Hotspot (Wi-Fi)

Wi-Fi hotspothotspothotspots
An access point (or hotspot) often has a range of about 20 m indoors while some modern access points claim up to a 150 m range outdoors.
A hotspot is a physical location where people may obtain Internet access, typically using Wi-Fi technology, via a wireless local-area network (WLAN) using a router connected to an Internet service provider.

Wireless LAN

WLANwireless local area networkwireless
Wi-Fi is a family of wireless networking technologies, based on the IEEE 802.11 family of standards, which are commonly used for local area networking of devices and Internet access. This includes wireless local area network (WLAN) connections, device to device connectivity (such as Wi-Fi Peer to Peer aka Wi-Fi Direct), Personal area network (PAN), local area network (LAN) and even some limited wide area network (WAN) connections.
Most modern WLANs are based on IEEE 802.11 standards and are marketed under the Wi-Fi brand name.

Ultra high frequency

UHFUHF bandultra-high frequency
Wi-Fi most commonly uses the 2.4 GHz UHF and 5 GHz SHF ISM radio bands; these bands are subdivided into multiple channels.
They are used for television broadcasting, cell phones, satellite communication including GPS, personal radio services including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, walkie-talkies, cordless phones, and numerous other applications.

CSIRO

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research OrganisationCouncil for Scientific and Industrial ResearchCSIR
The Australian radio-astronomer Dr John O'Sullivan with his colleagues Terence Percival, Graham Daniels, Diet Ostry, and John Deane developed a key patent used in Wi-Fi as a by-product of a Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) research project, "a failed experiment to detect exploding mini black holes the size of an atomic particle".
Notable developments by CSIRO have included the invention of atomic absorption spectroscopy, essential components of Wi-Fi technology, development of the first commercially successful polymer banknote, the invention of the insect repellent in Aerogard and the introduction of a series of biological controls into Australia, such as the introduction of myxomatosis and rabbit calicivirus for the control of rabbit populations.

Ethernet

Ethernet portEthernet cableEthernet network
Wi-Fi uses multiple parts of the IEEE 802 protocol family and is designed to seamlessly interwork with its wired sibling Ethernet.
The 48-bit MAC address was adopted by other IEEE 802 networking standards, including IEEE 802.11 Wi-Fi, as well as by FDDI, and EtherType values are also used in Subnetwork Access Protocol (SNAP) headers.

WaveLAN

Classic WaveLAN
In 1991, NCR Corporation with AT&T Corporation invented the precursor to 802.11, intended for use in cashier systems, under the name WaveLAN.
This led to the founding of the 802.11 Wireless LAN Working Committee which produced the original IEEE 802.11 standard, which eventually became the basis of the certification mark Wi-Fi.

ISM band

ISM2.4 GHz13.56 MHz
Wi-Fi most commonly uses the 2.4 GHz UHF and 5 GHz SHF ISM radio bands; these bands are subdivided into multiple channels.
Cordless phones, Bluetooth devices, near field communication (NFC) devices, garage door openers, baby monitors and wireless computer networks (WiFi) may all use the ISM frequencies, although these low power transmitters are not considered to be ISM devices.

IEEE 802.15.4

802.15.4IEEE 802.15.4-2006IEEE 802
Wi-Fi uses multiple parts of the IEEE 802 protocol family and is designed to seamlessly interwork with its wired sibling Ethernet.
It can be contrasted with other approaches, such as Wi-Fi, which offer more bandwidth and require more power.

ALOHAnet

Slotted AlohaALOHAALOHA protocol
In 1971, ALOHAnet connected the Great Hawaiian Islands with a UHF wireless packet network.
In the early 1980s frequencies for mobile networks became available, and in 1985 frequencies suitable for what became known as Wi-Fi were allocated in the US.

MAC address

MACMAC addressesEUI-64
Stations are identified by one or more MAC addresses.
This use is common in most IEEE 802 networking technologies, including Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth.

Wi-Fi Direct

WiFi DirectDirectDirect Wi-Fi
This includes wireless local area network (WLAN) connections, device to device connectivity (such as Wi-Fi Peer to Peer aka Wi-Fi Direct), Personal area network (PAN), local area network (LAN) and even some limited wide area network (WAN) connections.
Wi-Fi Direct, initially called Wi-Fi P2P(Peer to Peer), is a Wi-Fi standard enabling devices to easily connect with each other without requiring a wireless access point.

Internet

onlinethe Internetweb
Wi-Fi is a family of wireless networking technologies, based on the IEEE 802.11 family of standards, which are commonly used for local area networking of devices and Internet access.
Common methods of Internet access by users include dial-up with a computer modem via telephone circuits, broadband over coaxial cable, fiber optics or copper wires, Wi-Fi, satellite, and cellular telephone technology (e.g. 3G, 4G).

Wireless

wireless communicationwireless communicationswireless internet
The non-profit Wi-Fi Alliance was formed in 1999 to fill this void—to establish and enforce standards for interoperability and backward compatibility, and to promote wireless local-area-network technology.
This became its primary usage in the 2000s, due to the advent of technologies such as mobile broadband, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

Local area network

LANlocal networklocal
This includes wireless local area network (WLAN) connections, device to device connectivity (such as Wi-Fi Peer to Peer aka Wi-Fi Direct), Personal area network (PAN), local area network (LAN) and even some limited wide area network (WAN) connections.
Ethernet and Wi-Fi are the two most common technologies in use for local area networks.

IEEE 802.11ac

802.11acacWi-Fi 5
IEEE 802.11ac is a wireless networking standard in the 802.11 set of protocols (which is part of the Wi-Fi networking family), providing high-throughput wireless local area networks (WLANs) on the 5 GHz band.

Captive portal

captive portals
Wi-Fi hotspots may be set up either free-of-charge or commercially, often using a captive portal webpage for access.
A captive portal is a web page accessed with a web browser that is displayed to newly connected users of a Wi-Fi network before they are granted broader access to network resources.

IEEE 802.11n-2009

n802.11nIEEE 802.11n
As the first Wi-Fi standard that introduced MIMO (Multiple-Input and Multiple-Output) support, sometimes devices/systems that support 802.11n standard (or draft version of the standard) are being referred to as MIMO (Wi-Fi products), especially before the introduction of the next generation standard.

Integrated circuit

integrated circuitsmicrochipchip
, Wi-Fi-integrated circuit chips shipped approximately million units annually.
Examples include Intel's DECT cordless phone, or 802.11 (Wi-Fi) chips created by Atheros and other companies.

IPhone

iPhonesApple iPhoneiPhone app
Many smartphones have a built-in capability of this sort, including those based on Android, BlackBerry, Bada, iOS (iPhone), Windows Phone and Symbian, though carriers often disable the feature, or charge a separate fee to enable it, especially for customers with unlimited data plans.
The iPhone has Wi-Fi and can connect to cellular networks.

John O'Sullivan (engineer)

John O'SullivanJohn O' SullivanJohn O’Sullivan
The Australian radio-astronomer Dr John O'Sullivan with his colleagues Terence Percival, Graham Daniels, Diet Ostry, and John Deane developed a key patent used in Wi-Fi as a by-product of a Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) research project, "a failed experiment to detect exploding mini black holes the size of an atomic particle".
This technology was in 1994 patented by CSIRO and forms part of the 802.11a, 802.11g and 802.11n Wi-Fi standards and thus O'Sullivan is also credited with the invention of WIFI.

Tethering

mobile hotspottetherTethered
When subscribed to a cellular data carrier, they allow nearby Wi-Fi stations to access the Internet over 2G, 3G, or 4G networks using the tethering technique.
Connection of a mobile device with other devices can be done over wireless LAN (Wi-Fi), over Bluetooth or by physical connection using a cable, for example through USB.

Wireless network interface controller

wireless cardmac80211wireless network interface card
Wi-Fi is potentially more vulnerable to attack than wired networks because anyone within range of a network with a wireless network interface controller can attempt access.
The low cost and ubiquity of the Wi-Fi standard means that many newer mobile computers have a wireless network interface built into the motherboard.