Wi-Fi Alliance

Wi-Fi EasyMeshWireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance
Wi-Fi Alliance is a non-profit organization that promotes Wi-Fi technology and certifies Wi-Fi products for conformity to certain standards of interoperability.wikipedia
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Wi-Fi

WiFiwireless internetwireless
Wi-Fi Alliance is a non-profit organization that promotes Wi-Fi technology and certifies Wi-Fi products for conformity to certain standards of interoperability.
WiFi is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing.

Miracast

Wi-Fi Alliance extended Wi-Fi beyond wireless local area network applications into point-to-point and personal area networking and enabled specific applications such as Miracast.
Miracast is a standard for wireless connections from devices (such as laptops, tablets, or smartphones) to displays (such as TVs, monitors or projectors), introduced in 2012 by the Wi-Fi Alliance.

IEEE 802.11n-2009

n802.11n802.11b/g/n
Core MAC/PHY interoperability over 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11n. (at least one)
Wi-Fi Alliance have also labelled the technology for the standard as Wi-Fi 4.

Wireless Multimedia Extensions

WMMWireless MultimediaWME/WMM
New certification programs allow newer technology and specifications come into the marketplace. These certification programs may be mandatory (e.g. WPA2) or optional (e.g. WMM).
Wireless Multimedia Extensions (WME), also known as Wi-Fi Multimedia (WMM), is a Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification, based on the IEEE 802.11e standard.

Wi-Fi Protected Setup

WPSWi-Fi Simple Config
Wi-Fi Protected Setup, a specification developed by the Alliance to ease the process of setting up and enabling security protections on small office and consumer Wi-Fi networks.
Created by the Wi-Fi Alliance and introduced in 2006, the goal of the protocol is to allow home users who know little of wireless security and may be intimidated by the available security options to set up Wi-Fi Protected Access, as well as making it easy to add new devices to an existing network without entering long passphrases.

IEEE 802.11ac

802.11acac11ac
802.11ac (Wi-Fi 5)
The standard has been alternatively labelled as Wi-Fi 5 by Wi-Fi Alliance.

IEEE 802.11ax

802.11axaxWi-Fi 6
802.11ax (Wi-Fi 6;upcoming)
IEEE 802.11ax, labelled Wi-Fi 6 by Wi-Fi Alliance, is thought of as High-Efficiency Wireless (HEW), and is the Wireless Local Area specifications standard of IEEE 802.11 to reach full implementation in 2019.

Wireless Gigabit Alliance

WiGig Alliance
It was initially announced back in year 2013 by Wireless Gigabit Alliance, however it have been took over by Wi-Fi alliance in year 2013 and Wi-Fi alliance started certifying it in year 2016.
The alliance was subsumed by the Wi-Fi Alliance in March 2013.

Wi-Fi Protected Access

WPAWPA2WPA/WPA2
New certification programs allow newer technology and specifications come into the marketplace. These certification programs may be mandatory (e.g. WPA2) or optional (e.g. WMM).
Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2), and Wi-Fi Protected Access 3 (WPA3) are three security protocols and security certification programs developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to secure wireless computer networks.

WiGig

802.11ad60 GHz Wi-Fi (WiGig)Directional Multi-Gigabit
WiGig refers to 60 GHz Wireless local area network connection.
The name WiGig come from Wireless Gigabit Alliance, the original association being formed to promote the adaption of IEEE 802.11ad, however it is now certified by Wi-Fi Alliance.

Wi-Fi Direct

DirectDirect Wi-FiWiFi Direct network
In October 2010, the Alliance began to certify Wi-Fi Direct, that allows Wi-Fi-enabled devices to communicate directly with each other by setting up ad-hoc networks, without going through a wireless access point or hotspot.
The Wi-Fi Direct certification program is developed and administered by the Wi-Fi Alliance, the industry group that owns the "Wi-Fi" trademark.

IEEE 802.11

802.11802.11b/g/n802.11b/g
Not every IEEE 802.11-compliant device is submitted for certification to the Wi-Fi Alliance, sometimes because of costs associated with the certification process. TDLS, or Tunneled Direct Link Setup, is "a seamless way to stream media and other data faster between devices already on the same Wi-Fi network" based on IEEE 802.11z and added to Wi-Fi Alliance certification program in 2012.
In 1999, the Wi-Fi Alliance was formed as a trade association to hold the Wi-Fi trademark under which most products are sold.

TDLS

TDLS, or Tunneled Direct Link Setup, is "a seamless way to stream media and other data faster between devices already on the same Wi-Fi network" based on IEEE 802.11z and added to Wi-Fi Alliance certification program in 2012.
Wi-Fi Alliance added certification for TDLS in 2012.

IEEE 802.11u

802.11uu
It utilize IEEE 802.11u.
The Wi-Fi Alliance uses IEEE 802.11u in its "Wi-Fi Certified Passpoint" program, also known as "Hotspot 2.0".

IEEE 802.11ah

802.11ahahTarget Wake Time
Wi-Fi HaLow is a standard for low-power wide-area (LPWA) connection standard using sub-1GHz spectrum for IoT devices.
To date no commercial Wi-Fi HaLow chipsets are available on the market, below a list of companies that are part of Wi-Fi Alliance and are publicly developing Wi-Fi HaLow chipsets:

Interoperability

interoperableinteroperate interoperable
Wi-Fi Alliance is a non-profit organization that promotes Wi-Fi technology and certifies Wi-Fi products for conformity to certain standards of interoperability.

Trademark

trademarkstrade marktrademarked
The Wi-Fi Alliance owns the Wi-Fi trademark.

3Com

3Com Corporation3Com Corp.3Com Park
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).

Cisco Systems

CiscoCisco Systems, Inc.Cisco Networking Academy
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).

Harris Corporation

HarrisHarris Corp.Harris Semiconductor
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).

Intersil

Intersil CorporationHarrisIntersil Inc.
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).

Lucent

Lucent Technologies Lucent TechnologiesLucent Technologies Canada
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).

Alcatel-Lucent

AlcatelLucent TechnologiesLucent
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).

Nokia

Nokia CorporationNokia GroupNokia India
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).

Symbol Technologies

SymbolSymbol Technologies Inc.Telxon
The group of companies included 3Com, Aironet (acquired by Cisco), Harris Semiconductor (now Intersil), Lucent (was Alcatel-Lucent, then acquired by Nokia), Nokia and Symbol Technologies (now Zebra Technologies).